Date   

translation from hebrew needed #translation

Deborah Friedman
 

This is the headstone of my gr grandmother: Channa Ita Gratch Levi, buried at the Mt. of Olives in Jerusalem. I need a translation from the Hebrew please.

Thank you

Deborah Friedman
Walnut Creek, CA
dsfaec@...

MODERATOR NOTE:Please reply privately

Searching for: FRIEDMAN (KOPAIGOROD UKRAINE), SHULMAN/SCHULMAN (KOPAIGOROD UKRAINE), SPECTOR, GOLOGORSKY, KANSTERIN/KANSTEROOM, LIPSON (JERUSALEM), ZASLER (JERUSALEM, ZASLOW), LEVY, GRATZ/GRATCH, EISENSTEIN (DROHITCHIN), BENIOFF (KIEV AREA), SILBERMANN/SILVERMAN (ZEIL GERMANY), DINKELSPIEL(BADEN, GERMANY), MAIER, WIEDERQUIST, HOROWITZ (KIEV AREA), HESS (NEW ORLEANS), SANGER (NEW ORLEANS AND ALSACE), MAROZ (Ignatovka, Ukraine).


International Holocaust Remembrance Day #JewishGenUpdates

Avraham Groll
 
Edited

Today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, marking the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. 

Over seven decades have elapsed, and the collective loss of the Jewish people remains incalculable. Six million lives destroyed. Six million family trees cut off. Six million flames extinguished.

As a people, one of the most powerful forces that binds us together is memory. Across countries, denominations, and creeds, memory unites all of us.

We know that we will never forget. But, today, we remember.

Your Friends at JewishGen

Photo: The Forgotten Camps, JewishGen.org
May be an image of 1 person and standing


Help translate the last few letters of my Grandfather's collection #translation #lodz #poland

kesspark@...
 

Two more letters need translation getting me closer to completion!

I've posted two letters in Polish for which I need a translation. 
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89754
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89779

The previous letter posted yesterday is written in Russian not Polish as previously indicated. Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
Rachel Keiles Kessler Park
NYC

KEILES - Vilnius, Lodz, TSIGAR, TOBIAS, ASZ, ELEFAND - Vilnius, KESSLER - Starokonstantinov, LURIE - Dvinsk
DUBIN(sky), NAGIN(sky) - Poltava, ALPERT, SACHS


Re: Trying to get spellings of Hebrew names for gravestone #hungary

Diane Jacobs
 

Try calling Beth Israel Cemetery and ask if they would take a picture of the stone. As it is winter they are not busy with landscaping.

Diane Jacobs


On Jan 27, 2021, at 3:42 PM, LM <lmemsm@...> wrote:

My mom recently died and I've been trying for the past few months to
get the spellings of her parents in Hebrew for her gravestone. I have
recordings of their Hebrew names, but I can't find someone who can
give me a decent Hebrew spelling based on that. My grandfather's name
sounded like Shea Folig and the people I've asked are giving me
spellings like Joshua in Hebrew. He was originally from Ungvar,
Hungary. His English name is Sam, so I don't think he as called
Joshua. I know where my grandparents' gravestones are (Beth Israel in
Woodbridge NJ), but I'm not in the area to be able to find out if
their Hebrew names might be on their gravestones. I really don't know
what to do. I would like to get my mom's gravestone finalized, but I
don't want her parents' names totally misspelled on it. Does anyone
have any recommendations? Thank you.

Sincerely,
Laura Michaels

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Trying to get spellings of Hebrew names for gravestone #hungary

LM
 

My mom recently died and I've been trying for the past few months to
get the spellings of her parents in Hebrew for her gravestone. I have
recordings of their Hebrew names, but I can't find someone who can
give me a decent Hebrew spelling based on that. My grandfather's name
sounded like Shea Folig and the people I've asked are giving me
spellings like Joshua in Hebrew. He was originally from Ungvar,
Hungary. His English name is Sam, so I don't think he as called
Joshua. I know where my grandparents' gravestones are (Beth Israel in
Woodbridge NJ), but I'm not in the area to be able to find out if
their Hebrew names might be on their gravestones. I really don't know
what to do. I would like to get my mom's gravestone finalized, but I
don't want her parents' names totally misspelled on it. Does anyone
have any recommendations? Thank you.

Sincerely,
Laura Michaels


Re: Cemetery Photos: Mt. Sharon Cemetery, Springfield, PA #photographs #usa

Kenneth Ryesky
 

Mt. Lebanon and Mt. Sharon are frequently conflated with one another, being just a 3.5 km walk or drive apart.

As for Mt. Lebanon, it is adjacent to, has interconnecting roads with, and is maintained by the same crew as Har Zion Cemetery (though they have separate offices), so naturally, confusions between the two are not unknown.

--
Ken Ryesky,  Petach Tikva, Israel     kenneth.ryesky@... 

Researching:
RAISKY/REISKY, ARONOV, SHKOLNIK(OV), AEROV; Gomel, Belarus
GERTZIG, BRODSKY; Yelizavetgrad, Ukraine
BRODSKY, VASILESKY; Odessa, Ukraine
IZRAELSON, ARSHENOV; Yevpatoriya, Ukraine (Crimea)


You are invited to join the JGS of Southern Nevada Lecture Series! #events

Ben Kempner
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Southern Nevada (JGSSN) invites you to subscribe to our Jewish Genealogy Lecture Series by becoming a 2021 member for $20. 
 

Click here to become a member. 

 

Click here for more details on the topics, speakers, and times.

 


Ben Kempner
Vice President, JGSSN


Documentation for deceased Russian WWII vet who immigrated to Israel from Ukraine in 1990s #israel

jerome.hoffman@...
 

A recently discovered cousin of mine survived WWII in the Russian Army and immigrated to Israel from Ukraine in the 1990s.  Are there records of such immigration in Israel?  Are there societies of former WWII Russian Army immigrants in Israel?

Jerome Hoffman
Broomall, PA


Re: Aerial maps pre WW 2 #austria-czech #hungary #ukraine

Jay Osborn
 


Israel, you wrote:

> Does anyone know how and where you can locate aerial maps for Hungary
> and Ukraine pre world war 2.
>
> These map's can be a great source for old cemeteries etc.

I assume you mean aerial photographs, and I regret I don't know of good resources which exactly match your request. However, there are other resources which partially match, which I will describe here. Probably you know these already, but for the benefit of others:

1. ESJF European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative has been locating, surveying, and documenting Jewish cemeteries in central Europe since 2019, and the results of their work are updated online frequently:

https://www.esjf-surveys.org/home/

Ukraine has already been covered quite extensively, and Hungary is part of the project phase now in progress.

2. Historical cadastral maps of Austria-Hungary covered almost the entire empire, documenting land surveys in tremendous detail and with great accuracy. Not all of the original maps have survived in archives, but many thousands have. Only the western part of Ukraine (former eastern Galicia) was part of the Habsburg Monarchy, but that portion now has a special research project (the Gesher Galicia Map Room) which presents digitally-assembled maps from the 19th century:

https://maps.geshergalicia.org/

These maps clearly show cemeteries of all faiths as they existed at the time of the land surveys. A brief presentation discussing ways to use these maps to research Jewish cemeteries was given at a conference in Vilnius in 2015, and is online:

slides: https://maps.geshergalicia.org/references/osborn_cadmap_14_s1.pdf
text: https://maps.geshergalicia.org/references/osborn_cadmap_14_print_t1.pdf

In Hungary and elsewhere, the Mapire web application overlays historical cadastral maps on both common internet maps and on modern aerial photographic maps:

https://mapire.eu/en/map/cadastral/

Archives in each of the "daughter" countries of the Habsburg Monarchy preserve these maps, and some have digitized them and presented them online.

3. Aerial photography was used by the German Luftwaffe during World War II to document areas they controlled and as they were withdrawing from occupied land. More than a million of these photos survived the war and are now held in archives in the US and the UK. The photos are currently being used in Jewish cemetery preservation projects in Poland and Ukraine (and noo doubt beyond) as in these examples of burial sites which remained mostly intact through the war:

https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/cemeteries/resources/essays-and-op-eds/poland-ww2-luftwaffe-aerial-photos/

and which were extensively destroyed:

https://rohatynjewishheritage.org/en/maps/1944-aerial-photo/

Each of these approaches is described on a page outlining survey methods for Jewish cemetery preservation projects (the focus is on western Ukraine but the methods are broadly applicable):

https://jewishheritageguide.net/en/guide/survey

I do hope another reader of this digest will be able to provide information which better fits your specific request; we could all use those resources!

Kind regards,
Jay Osborn


Re: Naming Conventions #names

Lee Jaffe
 

My 2x great-father was named Eliezer, which explains 3 Elis and 3 Elizabeths two generations later.  My great-grandmother's brother Louis was killed in battle during WW I.  There are a half--dozen children named  Louis or (oddly) Lewis and Lois in the next generations. 

Lee Jaffe


Re: Searching for Hyman, de Young and Van Ryn #unitedkingdom

Mike Coleman
 

Hi David.

Are you on Ancestry? A search for Phoebe van Ryn in England, with no other limitations, produced 465 hits, some of which could provide leads for you.

Mike Coleman  London U.K.


Re: Cemetery Photos: Mt. Sharon Cemetery, Springfield, PA #photographs #usa

Steve Hamburg
 

I definitely second Fred Kolbrener's suggestion to check out the Findagrave.com entries for Mount Sharon. I also highly-recommend becoming a member, as you may discover a number of family memorials that are already there but require someone more engaged (like a family member or friend) to step in and manage them. Yes, the site has its drawbacks, as Ken Ryesky pointed out, but I have generally found it to be an incredibly valuable resource. Thanks to FAG I was able to discover the graves of great-grandparents (and in my great-grandmother's case, her English first name and actual date of death) when family interviews and other research had come up with bupkis (e.g., the Death Certificate for my great-grandfather said he was buried at Mount Lebanon Cemetery, but there were no records of him at the cemetery's office). 

Even more germane in your case, I was able to connect with a major contributor (over 100K photos!) on FAG who lives in Delaware County and can almost certainly assist you. Please contact me directly and I'll give you her contact information, as I'm hesitant to share it in this forum. But users of FAG who frequently search in Delaware County cemeteries will no doubt already be familiar with her!

 

Steve Hamburg
Chicago, IL 


Berdychev records #ukraine

Ozzy Bernstein
 

Hi all,

I'm looking for resources to find archived documents on my great grandparents from Berdychiv, Ukraine. They lived there from at least 1830 till around 1906. The surnames were Iserov and Grinberg. I have found the Lipes Data Base online as well as the Tsal Kaplan Foundation. Lipes charges a lot for just one document and Tsal Kaplan doesn't have the option to search through documents as of yet. I don't read Russian or Ukrainian so even once I find the right place for the documents, I would need a translator. For anyone who has experience in this area of Ukraine: what is your advice to take the next step on this search?

Thanks.

Ozzy Bernstein


Feb. 11: CJH Zoom genealogy lecture #events #poland

Moriah Amit
 

Family History Today: Finding your Eastern European Jewish Family on JRI-Poland.org
Presented by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the Center for Jewish History

Thursday, February 11, 3 PM ET

Pay what you wish! Register at https://programs.cjh.org/tickets/family-history-today-2021-02-11 to receive a link to the Zoom program.

 

For 25 years, JRI-Poland.org has served as the preferred database for the historical Jewish records that survive in the archives of Poland. This vast collection of 6.2 million documents includes information about towns and families from Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, Germany, and the former territories of Galicia and Prussia. In this lecture, Robinn Magid, Assistant Director of JRI-Poland.org, will recount some truly memorable stories of genealogical breakthroughs achieved by researchers, and will demonstrate how you can take advantage of this vast resource.

--
Moriah Amit
Senior Genealogy Librarian, Center for Jewish History
New York, NY
mamit@...


Seeking information-Malducioniai Volostj, Lithuania #lithuania

Susan Miller
 

I would appreciate any information and/or leads pertaining to Malducioniai volostj, Kovno, Lithuania.  It is 3.5 miles north of Pushelat.  I am interested in
-size of Malducioniai volotstj in the 19th century
-names of villages and shteltls within the volostj
-sources that describe 19th century Jewish life in Malducioniai
-contacts that were or are associated with Malducioniai, and may have information

Thank you!
Susan Miller

Davidson/Davidov- Pushelat/Pumpian/Malducioniai, Lithuania
Dorman- Obukhiv/Kiev city, Ukraine
Bukrensky- Ukraine or Lithuania
Pekar- Rozhev Agricultural Colony, Ukraine


Re: Chicago Obituary Lookup Request #usa

Jay Lechtman
 

Sandi,

I didn't find an obituary, but I did find this interesting and unfortunate (and hopefully relevant) story from The Chicago Tribune on October 25, 1914.



Jay Lechtman
jay.lechtman@...

LECHTMAN (Chisinau, Moldova and Snitivka, Ukraine)
SLEPKOW (Chisinau, Moldova)
DRESSLER (Podvolochisk, Ukraine)
HERBST (Mikulintsy, Ukraine)
RUDNITSKY (Telekhany, Belarus)
RABINOWITZ (Kosava, Belarus)
ABRAMOWITZ (Bucharest, Romania)
ROSENTHAL (Iasi, Romania)


JGSCT Virtual Program, February 21, 2021, 1:30 #announcements #education #names

gkr
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents a webinar on Jewish given names by Warren Blatt.

This virtual program is free for JGSCT members and a $5 donation for non-members.

To join JGSCT, click here.

To donate $5 to join the February 21, 2021 webinar, click here.

Learn why “Mordechai Yehuda” is also “Mortka Leib” is also “Max”. An introduction to Jewish given names (first names), focusing on practical issues for genealogical research. Our ancestors each had many different given names and nicknames, in various languages and alphabets – this can make Jewish genealogical research difficult. This presentation will teach you about the history and patterns of Jewish first names, and how to recognize your ancestors' names in genealogical sources. Topics include: Religious and secular names; origins of given names; variants, nicknames, and diminutives; double names (unrelated pairs, kinnui, Hebrew/Yiddish translations); patronymics; name equivalents; Ashkenazic naming traditions (naming of children); statistics on the distribution and popularity of given names in various regions and times; spelling issues; Polish and Russian declensions; interpretation of names in documents; and the Anglicization of immigrant Jewish names: adaptations and transformations.

Warren Blatt has served as the Chief Genealogist and Managing Director of JewishGen (www.jewishgen.org). He is the author of "Resources for Jewish Genealogy in the Boston Area" (JGSGB, 1996); and co-author (with Gary Mokotoff) of "Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy" (Avotaynu, 1999). He has over 40 years of research experience with Russian and Polish Jewish records and is the author of the "JewishGen FAQ" and many other JewishGen InfoFiles. He was the Chair of the 15th International Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. In 2004, he was awarded the IAJGS Lifetime Achievement Award in Jerusalem.

--
Gail K Reynolds, Publicity Chair, Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut


Re: I am looking for my stepsister #general

Vered Dayan
 

I have more questions than answers, but maybe they will give you a direction where to look. If your father hadn't already tried this, try to  check with Yad Vashem or the Holocaust Museum in Washington everything possible about this DP camp  and narrow your search - How many babies were born there around this time? How many baby girls? Where and how were the births recorded? Try to look for a birth certificate with your father's last name. You can also check the Bad-Arolsen online archive ( https://arolsen-archives.org/en/search-explore/search-online-archive/ ) for your father's name, maybe you'll find his DP card with some info.
Good Luck,
Vered Dayan
Israel


Re: Naming Conventions #names

sharon yampell
 

I have two first cousins once removed, brother and sister, who are each named after one set of their grandparents, thus honoring both a male and a female in their family…

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, New Jersey

 

From: Stephen Weinstein via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2021 2:52 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Naming Conventions #names

 

On Mon, Jan 25, 2021 at 05:40 PM, Carl Kaplan wrote:

1. Would it be acceptable for males to be named after females, and females after males?
2. Was it acceptable to name multiple children in the same immediate family after the same relative, using just the first letters of the names?

1. I (male) am named after a man and a woman (my first name for one and my middle name for the other).  My brother (male) is named after a man and a woman (his first name for one and his middle name for the other).  My niece (female) is also named for two different individuals, at least one male.  I don't know if this was "acceptable" or not; but it was done.

2. In some families, when naming for someone of the same gender, even if the English (or secular) name is a different name with only the same first letter, the Hebrew name is the same as that of the other person.  Because siblings can't have the same Hebrew name, they wouldn't be named for the same person if you are using the Hebrew name (not just the first letter) of the person for whom you are naming.
 
--
Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...

 


Re: Migration from Suwalki Gubernia To S.C. #poland #lithuania

Debbie Garfunkel Popper
 

Your great grandfather's nephew, Isaac Wolf Banov, married my great grandmother's sister, Hannah Volaski.  Many Jews migrated to the south for economic opportunities and there were large (relative to the number of Jews in America) Jewish communities in Charleston, Savannah, Columbia, etc.  If you contact me privately, I will be happy to share more details about the family.  

Debbie Garfunkel Popper
debbiepopper4@...

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