Date   

Re: 1939 Refugee Routes from Poland #poland

Jill Whitehead
 

I have recently done a talk for the JGSGB on the Jewish family that occupied my house for nearly 50 years. One of them Ladislav Dukes escaped in May/June 1939 from Bratislava in Slovakia down the Danube via Budapest to the Romanian coast at Tulcea/Constantia on a Polish boat arranged by Zionist groups. He then got on a Greek registered boat for Palestine (the Liesel), but the boat was captured and its occupants arrested by the British in early June 1939 (details on Paul Silverstone's website).

Ladislav signed up to the Free Czech army and was taken to Marseilles later in November 1939. His Marseilles enlistment is on the CzechAndSlovakThings website. He then fought in the Battle of France, but the Czech and Polish troops who fought in this had to be rescued in June 1940 at several French ports notably Bordeaux, but also Marseilles, where they were taken to Britain (info from my friend David Worsfold who is writing a book on this). Ladislav likely left from Bordeaux where he may have witnessed a terrible massacre of leaving troops by the Nazis.

The Jewish soldiers who had made the Danube trip, then the Palestine trip, then fought in France, then left under the Nazi onslaught, then took part in a mutiny at Cholmondeley Camp, Chester (NW England) in protest at their treatment by Czech commanding officers in the Free Czech Army.  These experiences took its toll on Ladislav, who died in an asylum in London many years later with the equivalent of shell shock or PTSD. This will all form part 2 of an article I have written for Shemot, the journal of the JGSGB to appear later this year .

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Re: Yiddish Names-Kadshevitz Family From Anyksciai, Lithuania #names

David Shapiro
 

It is the same rabbi. Kalman is short for Kalonymus.

It you search for Anyksciai on the ALD you will see that all the families we have mentioned are there - Kadishevitz, Shapiro, Finn, Jaffe. They were all interrelated. There is an Anyksciai project on Family Tree DNA. If you tested there you should join, and maybe we will be able to untangle things.

David Shapiro


Translation Hebrew German #germany #translation

info@...
 

Dear group,

I have posted a picture of the curtain of a Torah. I would appreciate a translation of the Hebrew text in German or English. The name of the village is probably Biebesheim.

Thank you very much in advance

Wolfgang Fritzsche, Germany

 


Re: Ethnicity on My Heritage #dna #general

Jill Whitehead
 

As I and others have repeatedly said the ethnicity percentage is mainly meaningless on any of the DNA sites for people of Jewish heritage (due to endogamous populations - ie closed communities and marriages with close relations such as 1st cousins). I would ignore them. They all give different percentages anyway and all use different population samples from different parts of the world, which may or may not assist. It is all down to algorithms in the end, and they are not a substitute for reality checks. Our ancestors came from a variety of different areas over the last few thousand years, so it is hard to pick through this. 

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Re: Apparent Change to Ancestry Messaging #dna

Alan Cohen
 

If I receive a message on Ancestry, when I reply I always ask the sender to change to using my normal email instead of continuing on Ancestry messaging. It's much more reliable.

Alan Cohen


ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation #poland

Laufer, Shmuel
 

A need Russian translation for 5 certificates of families from Przasnysz .

I don't need word-for-word but details such as names, dates, locations, occupations, and so on are very helpful.

 

A birth certificate of Estera Filut for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM91540

 

 A marriage Certificate Moshe Talarek y Sura Fink for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

 https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM91541

 

A death certificate of Moshe Talarek for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address .... 

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM91542

 

A birth certificate of Moshe Zyman for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ....

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM91543

 

 A death certificate of Chaia Sura Zyman for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ....

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM91544

 

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

 Thanks in advance

  

Shmuel Laufer

Rehovot -Israel

 Research: Laufer (Przasnysz, Poland); Domb (Pultusk, Poland); Bruckman (Sarnaki, Poland); Zelazo (Sarnaki, Poland); Preschel (Berhomet, Chernivets'ka, Ukraine), Leder (Berhomet, Chernivets'ka, Ukraine); Schnap (Berhomet, Chernivets'ka, Ukraine); Mitelman (Chelm, Poland); Tenerman (Dubienka, Poland)


Eisenhandler connections #general

Mjacobsfr@...
 

Some time ago I posted a message concerning Werner Eisenhandler connections on behalf of my husband’s cousin. I received some replies at the time but wasn’t able to see any further connections. However, one of the replies, from Reba Solomon, indicated some possible Eisenhandler Metzger connections. We would like to investigate this possibility in more detail as well as any other Eisenhandler connections out there!
I can be contacted via the following email address: mjacobsfr@....
Thank you so much in advance for any help you can provide.
Best regards,
Maggie Jacobs
Just for the record (and trying to follow the guidelines for posts), I was born in Scotland but have spent most of my life in France.


Falkenflik/Falk #usa #ukraine #poland #names #galicia

carolsorgen@...
 

I’m trying to find the descendants of my great-aunt, Sure Lea Falkenflik. She was born in 1887 in Borszczow to Mendel Falkenflik and Chaje Breine Gezler. She emigrated to New York, arriving on May 11, 1907. That’s the last I can find of her. She probably shortened the last name to Falk (if she didn’t get married first). If this sounds familiar to anyone, please get in touch. Thank you!
Carol Sorgen

 
 


Re: Question about New York City Marriage Records #records

Richard Werbin
 

I have spent a lot of time at the Municipal Archives and have looked at both Marriage License Applications & Marriage Certificates.
The Archives have the Certificates only through about 1938. These have been digitized and you view them there on a PC.
They have the Licenses up to about 1948. These are only on microfilm.
The Certificates have 2 small pages: front & back.
The Licenses are 3 - 4 larger pages.
The last page of the License is usually a transcription of all the information on the certificate.
If it is not a first marriage, Licenses will also include the outcome of the first marriage (divorce, death, etc.)  & the name of the first spouse.

It is always better to get the License Application. It has more information than the certificate.
Also, if the handwriting is hard to read, the License may have the information both on page 1 & 2. That doubles your chance of reading correctly.
--
Richard Werbin    New York, New York     JGSNY Membership Vice President


Re: Question about New York City Marriage Records #records

A. E. Jordan
 

The license was issued first and as people said it was permission to marry. It was not mandatory but most people got it. Then they got married and both the license and the certificate were filled out with the details. The license went to the NYC Clerk and the marriage certificate went to the Health Department. Later i the 1930s the duplication went away but that does matter to you.

Both documents asked for the name, address, profession, age, place of birth, parent's name and place of birth and if it was the first marriage. The City Clerk doing the license asked for more specific answers sometimes and if either person admitted that they had been married before the clerk asked for etails, ie when and where they were divorced or if the prior spouse(s) was living or dead. Also if the bride was young the clerk asked for parential consent. Some of the license files have supporting documents attched if there was a divorce or a parential consent.

When the ceremony was performed the details were filled out and the witnesses signed the documents. Then they were returned to the two offices and now on microfilm.

You can order original copies from the NYC Municipal Archives but you pay for each separately. The certificates only are also at the LDS Family History Centers and some people have a trick to get them now by sitting in the parking lots.  The records are free at the LDS.

The LDS also has summariized a lot of them on FamilySearch.org but sometimes there are errors.

The licenses and the certificates are all indexed online at various pages.

Hope that helps. Questions please feel free to write back.

Allan Jordan



-----Original Message-----
From: David Levine <davidelevine@...>
To: main@...
Sent: Tue, Mar 9, 2021 11:59 am
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Question about New York City Marriage Records #records

Hi everyone

I am new to NYC marriage records. I understand that not all records are online though a number of indexes are and that the coverage is not complete.
I also understand that you can order records here from the NYC Municipal Archive: 
https://www1.nyc.gov/site/records/historical-records/holdings.page

My Question is this. I have found an index ancestry for relatives:
https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/61406/images/47512_546381-01627?pId=6546128
Volume 11:


There are no other records that I can find for this Index entry online
What is the difference between a marriage certificate and a marriage license? 
And, is the information in the screenshot what I use to order the marriage certificate / license from the NYC Municipal Archive?

_._,_._,_


JGS of Pittsburgh presents Crista Cowan: "The Jewish Record Collection on Ancestry" (corrected registration link) #jgs-iajgs #records #events #announcements

Steve Jaron
 

(Please note a previous version of this message had the wrong link for registration, the link is now corrected)
Please join The Jewish Genealogy Society of Pittsburgh for our next program with Crista Cowan from Ancestry.com.
 
With more than 24 billion online records, Ancestry has a lot to offer Jewish family history researchers. Join Crista Cowan for a look at records in the United States, Canada, and England specific to Jewish immigrants, as well as tips for researching the millions of JewishGen records, Holocaust records, and other European records from the 18th and 19th century for those of Jewish descent. She’ll add a few tips for successful searching as well.  
 
Crista Cowan has been employed by Ancestry.com since 2004; her involvement in family history, however, reaches all the way back to childhood. From being parked under a microfilm reader at the Family History Library in her baby carrier to her current career as a professional genealogist, Crista has spent thousands of hours discovering, documenting and telling family stories.

In her time at Ancestry she has been a European Content Acquisition Manager, the Digital Preservation Indexing Manager and the Community Alliance Manager for the Ancestry World Archives Project. For the past several years she has been the Corporate Genealogist, with responsibilities for speaking and teaching at genealogy conferences around the world and helping with family history research for public relations stories. Known online as The Barefoot Genealogist with a weekly internet show designed to help people discover their family history.
 
Date/Time/Location
Webinar (Zoom)
Wednesday, March 24, 2021
7pm
 
Registration
This virtual meeting costs $5 per person. 
It’s free for Jewish Genealogy Society members.
 
Please register online by clicking here. International registrants please contact us for directions on registration.

To become a member or to renew please visit our website. An $18 annual membership gets you free admission to our monthly programs and a free subscription to our monthly newsletter—valued at more than $60. If you think you will attend four events in the coming year, it's cheaper to become a member.

For further information please contact us via our website or our email below

Thank You
Steven Jaron, President
Jewish Genealogy Society of Pittsburgh
JGS email: pghjgs@...
JGS web: www.pghjgs.org
JGS Facebook: www.facebook.com/pghjgs
JGS Twitter: www.twitter.com/pghjgs
JGS Insta: www.instagram.com/pghjgs 


Re: Question about New York City Marriage Records #records

A. E. Jordan
 




-----Original Message-----
From: rich.meyersburg@...

In addition to the excellent explanations about the difference between a marriage certificate and a marriage license, there is one other major difference between a marriage license and a marriage certificate.   A marriage certificate means that the couple were actually married.  A marriage license does not.  So, it is possible that a marriage license was issued but the marriage never took place.

Rich Meyersburg
Laurel, MD
_._,_._,_


No this is incorrect. There are very few differences between the normal NYC marriage license and the marriage certiifcate. They asked the same set of questions. At times the clerk asked for more specifics for a date of birth versus just an age or year and also a city not just a country. But mostly the big difference is if the bride was very young because the license would require parential consent and if they admitted to having been married before the clerk asked for more details versus the mariage certificate.

The marrage license second or third page is for the person performing the marriage to fill in when they performed the ceremony. The same set of details about the ceremony are filled in on that page as it is on the marriage certificate.

It is possible that the licenses was taken out and not a ceremony but the license copy will show the details of the ceremony if the license was returned to the clerk.  Rarely you find licenses that are not on file with the clerk and then it is possibe the ceremony did not take place.

The license was also "portable" to use a 21st century term .... meaning you could get a NYC license and the ceremony could have been performed any where in the state. So the license form would tell you that too.

The best difference between the license is that the file goes past the end of the file for the certificates in NYC and licenses over 50 years of age are public record. When both exist comparing the two can sometimes also help with issues of marks that are blocking reading details or to try and dechiper hard to read handwriting.

Allan Jordan




Re: Yiddish Names-Kadshevitz Family From Anyksciai, Lithuania #names

crystalbrown3431@...
 

Michele

Typically I see the Anyksciai rabbi's name spelled as Kalman Yitzhak Kadishevitz and  I believe he was the only Anikst rabbi of that name.   I suspect that Kalman and Kalonymus are one and the same.

Richard Brown
Glastonbury, CT


Re: Rebbetzin Rivka bat R' Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN ABD of Kolomyya #rabbinic

Aaron Slotnik
 

Well, clicked the wrong button . . .

I'm trying to find out more information about Rivka who was a daughter
of Rabbi Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN (1740 - 1829), ABD Kolomyya. According to
Meorei Galicia, her first marriage was to R' Menachem Mendel ROSEN.
After he died in Iasi on their way to Eretz Yisrael, she continued on
and married a prominent Sephardic Rabbi.

Who was the Sephardic Rabbi? When did she die and how old was she? For
some reason, I think she is buried is Safed but I can't find the source
so I could be mistaken.

Regards,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL


Re: Question about New York City Marriage Records #records

rich.meyersburg@...
 

In addition to the excellent explanations about the difference between a marriage certificate and a marriage license, there is one other major difference between a marriage license and a marriage certificate.   A marriage certificate means that the couple were actually married.  A marriage license does not.  So, it is possible that a marriage license was issued but the marriage never took place.

Rich Meyersburg
Laurel, MD


great synagogue of london hebrew translation #unitedkingdom #translation

arnold friedman <afriedman21@...>
 

hi,  appreciate if someone would translate the hebrew in the next to last row of the attachment, which is the wedding information for morris jacobs and marianna green.    i also attached the uk government marriage record for morris and marianna for reference.  i have found sometimes the fathers name varies in these two records.
 
i am interested in the whole record translation, but have hit a brick wall with Morris Jacobs who was born in poland.  I am hoping the hebrew translation helps with clues on fathers names or witnesses.
 
Morris Jacobs changed his name to Maurice Jackson in Canada.  I do not think he was every naturalized in England or Canada, and am open for suggestions of where i might find his city of birth.  From all the census and passenger documents i have found he lists Poland or Poland/Russia.   I don't know his name in Poland, assuming something like Moshe Jacobs??
 
anyway, thanks for help with hebrew translation.
 
best,
arnold friedman
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately

MORRIS JACOBS    married in London 1877, born in Poland.
MARIANNA GREEN  born in London
 
 
 
 


Re: Using My Heritage #general

mvayser@...
 

It's possible that the they are adding these records because MyHeritage suggests a relationship and offers to add matches, including a profile photo and the rest of their information.  I've had that happen with my own tree in Geni. MyHeritage found a match there and offered to add it to the tree in MyHeritage from the Geni tree.  it obviously doesn't know (or care) that I created the Geni entries.  It saved me time not having to add them manually to 2 sites.

Mike Vayser


Re: My Heritage Announces Collection of Lithuanian -Jewish Records #lithuania #records #announcements

Michael Herzlich
 

How is (Is?) the My Heritage Lithuanian Jewish records collection different than the one on Jewishgen?
--
Michael Herzlich
Delray Beach, Florida USA

Belarus - EPSTEIN, HELFAND, POLLACK
Galicia (Poland, Ukraine) - HERZLICH, TREIBER


Jewish Genealogical Society New York March 21 Meeting: Fragments that Remain: The Search for My Mother's Lost Family #announcements #jgs-iajgs

Phyllis Rosner
 

Jewish Genealogical Society NY Meeting
Sunday March 21, 2020 at 2 p.m. EDT
Zoom Webinar

Fragments that Remain: The Search for My Mother's Lost Family

Speaker: Jennie Milne

In this presentation, Jennie Milne will describe her extraordinary journey to understand her mother’s mysterious background, as well as her Jewish and Polish ancestry. Raised in a wartime babies' home in Devon, England, Jennie's mother, Elizabeth Lis, found and briefly met with her parents, individually, in the mid-1960s, but subsequently lost contact and was unable to find them later in life.

In March 2014 Jennie began searching in earnest for her grandparents.  With the assistance of expert genealogists at JewishGen, JRI-Poland and Tracing the Tribe, as well as through DNA analysis, Jennie was able to break the silence of years. In this talk Jennie will take us through the extensive research that led to her understanding, as well as to her discovery of previously unknown cousins.

Jennie Workman Milne was born in Greenwich, London, and currently lives in North East Scotland. A freelance professional photographer, Jennie holds a Master's degree in Communication Design (Photography) from Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen. She presented her family story at the 2018 IAJGS conference in Warsaw. In February of 2020 Robert Gordon University mounted an exhibition of Jennie's research project documenting Jewish survivors of terrorism in Israel, along with her photographs documenting the search for her family.    

All are welcome; attendance is free, but registration is required:

Click here to register at our website

Submitted by:
Phyllis Rosner jgsny.org
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


Recommendation for lawyers in Europe #germany

cath <cathkumar@...>
 

My sister and I are applying for the restoration of our right to German nationality because our grandfather was a German Jew who lost his nationality while the Nazi government was in power. We have a lot of documentation and also a lot of questions.
We don't have much money, can anyone point us in the direction of an inexpensive but effective lawyer?
Thanks in advance for your advice 
Catherine Kumar

#lawyers #legaladvice #citizenshiprestoration

6181 - 6200 of 662822