Date   

Orynin/ #ukraine

shlomo.ris@...
 

Hello Anna,

Sorry for the confusion. I have an (not quite sure) assumption that
my maternal grandmother came >from Akkerman? near Odessa?.

Maybe I will come to Kamenets sometime .

My paternal family names are Risemberg (Orynin) and Sandler
(Pren/Preinai/Lithuania).

My maternal family names are Barsky (Ukraine?) and Rochansky
(Ukaine? Odessa region? Akkerman?) )

I also have famliy by the name of Dunayevitch (no contact) . Maybe
thay also came >from your region?


Best
Shlomo


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Orynin/ #ukraine

shlomo.ris@...
 

Hello Anna,

Sorry for the confusion. I have an (not quite sure) assumption that
my maternal grandmother came >from Akkerman? near Odessa?.

Maybe I will come to Kamenets sometime .

My paternal family names are Risemberg (Orynin) and Sandler
(Pren/Preinai/Lithuania).

My maternal family names are Barsky (Ukraine?) and Rochansky
(Ukaine? Odessa region? Akkerman?) )

I also have famliy by the name of Dunayevitch (no contact) . Maybe
thay also came >from your region?


Best
Shlomo


JGSGW September 20, 2015 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

JGSGW SEPTEMBER 20, 2015 MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its September
2015 meeting on Sunday, September 20, 2015 at 1:00 pm at B'nai Israel
Congregation, 6301 Montrose Rd, Rockville, MD 20852

Program:"Case Study: Genealogy of Renee Kaufman"
Speaker: Stephen P. Morse

This lecture presents a case study illustrating how to transform minimal
information into a detailed genealogy using One-Step Webpage tools and other
websites. The presentation also teaches how to find records in spite of name
misspellings, and how to analyze evidence to avoid accepting wrong information.

Steve Morse earned degrees in Electrical Engineering >from the City College
of NY, the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and New York University.
Architect of the Intel 8086 chip, he has worked for Bell Laboratories, IBM's
Watson Research Center, and GE Corporate Research and Development. He is
also the founder and developer of the One-Step Webpages, used by
genealogists worldwide, and co-author with Dr. Alexander Beider of the
Beider-Morse Phonetic Name Matching Algorithm.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW September 20, 2015 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

JGSGW SEPTEMBER 20, 2015 MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its September
2015 meeting on Sunday, September 20, 2015 at 1:00 pm at B'nai Israel
Congregation, 6301 Montrose Rd, Rockville, MD 20852

Program:"Case Study: Genealogy of Renee Kaufman"
Speaker: Stephen P. Morse

This lecture presents a case study illustrating how to transform minimal
information into a detailed genealogy using One-Step Webpage tools and other
websites. The presentation also teaches how to find records in spite of name
misspellings, and how to analyze evidence to avoid accepting wrong information.

Steve Morse earned degrees in Electrical Engineering >from the City College
of NY, the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and New York University.
Architect of the Intel 8086 chip, he has worked for Bell Laboratories, IBM's
Watson Research Center, and GE Corporate Research and Development. He is
also the founder and developer of the One-Step Webpages, used by
genealogists worldwide, and co-author with Dr. Alexander Beider of the
Beider-Morse Phonetic Name Matching Algorithm.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


Re: Orynin/Ukraine #ukraine

shlomo.ris@...
 

Phyllis,

Thank you so much for your reply. Awaiting your pics and additional
information.

Best

Shlomo

On Mon, Aug 24, 2015 at 3:37 AM, Phyllis Ruffer <pnudel@...> wrote:
Hi!

My grandmother's family is >from Orinin (Orynin). I was there in 2007 and
I
took a lot of pictures. I'm going out right now, but I will connect you
to my album sometime this week. I have some information about my family from
Orinin, but not so much. Let's stay in touch.

Best,
Phyllis Ruffer


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Orynin/Ukraine #ukraine

shlomo.ris@...
 

Phyllis,

Thank you so much for your reply. Awaiting your pics and additional
information.

Best

Shlomo

On Mon, Aug 24, 2015 at 3:37 AM, Phyllis Ruffer <pnudel@...> wrote:
Hi!

My grandmother's family is >from Orinin (Orynin). I was there in 2007 and
I
took a lot of pictures. I'm going out right now, but I will connect you
to my album sometime this week. I have some information about my family from
Orinin, but not so much. Let's stay in touch.

Best,
Phyllis Ruffer


Orynin #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

Sadly, like many towns in Ukraine, we have no Town Leader to be a contact
point for this town. We have minimal information on it. There is a link on
the Town Page to a page on Yahad-in-unum that has interviews with
eyewitnesses to the murder of the Jewish inhabitants of this place, and
which pinpoints the mass gravesite. If someone wants to serve as a contact
for this town and is willing to help identify other resources about this
place, I would love to hear >from you. Please let me know you can help.

Chuck Weinstein
Towns Director, Ukraine SIG
Cmw521@...
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505

-----Original Message-----
From: Ukraine SIG [mailto:ukraine@...]
Sent: Saturday, August 22, 2015 3:54 AM
Subject: [ukraine] Orynin/Ukraine

Hello all,

I have just found out that one branch of my family originated >from the
village of Orynin, near Kamenets -Podolsky.

I would appreciate any information regarding jewish life in Orynin.

Regards

Shlomo


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Orynin #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

Sadly, like many towns in Ukraine, we have no Town Leader to be a contact
point for this town. We have minimal information on it. There is a link on
the Town Page to a page on Yahad-in-unum that has interviews with
eyewitnesses to the murder of the Jewish inhabitants of this place, and
which pinpoints the mass gravesite. If someone wants to serve as a contact
for this town and is willing to help identify other resources about this
place, I would love to hear >from you. Please let me know you can help.

Chuck Weinstein
Towns Director, Ukraine SIG
Cmw521@...
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505

-----Original Message-----
From: Ukraine SIG [mailto:ukraine@...]
Sent: Saturday, August 22, 2015 3:54 AM
Subject: [ukraine] Orynin/Ukraine

Hello all,

I have just found out that one branch of my family originated >from the
village of Orynin, near Kamenets -Podolsky.

I would appreciate any information regarding jewish life in Orynin.

Regards

Shlomo


Re: Orynin/Ukraine #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

Yad V'Shem's Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust
says:

Orinen. Kamenets-Podolski dist., Ukraine. Jews were first present in
1582 and in 1765 they numbered 386. In 1897, their pop. was 2,142 out
of 5,727. In the Soviet period, the town had a Jewish council (soviet),
kolkhoz, tailors union and a school with a library. The Jewish pop.
was 1,797 in 1926 and 1,508 in 1939. In late June 1942, the Nazis and
their Ukrainian collaborators surrounded the Jewish quarter and selected
250 skilled workers for transfer to Kamenets-Podolski, where they later
perished. The remaining 1,745 Jews were led a mile outside the town
toward the village of Zherdya and executed. Among the victims were
530 children and 40 infants.

Where Once We Walked gives the population as 1,797 and locates it
62 km NNE of Chernivitsi at coordinates 48o46'/26o24'.

Hope this helps.

Doug Cohen
Sarasota, FL
Lexington, MA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Orynin/Ukraine #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

Yad V'Shem's Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust
says:

Orinen. Kamenets-Podolski dist., Ukraine. Jews were first present in
1582 and in 1765 they numbered 386. In 1897, their pop. was 2,142 out
of 5,727. In the Soviet period, the town had a Jewish council (soviet),
kolkhoz, tailors union and a school with a library. The Jewish pop.
was 1,797 in 1926 and 1,508 in 1939. In late June 1942, the Nazis and
their Ukrainian collaborators surrounded the Jewish quarter and selected
250 skilled workers for transfer to Kamenets-Podolski, where they later
perished. The remaining 1,745 Jews were led a mile outside the town
toward the village of Zherdya and executed. Among the victims were
530 children and 40 infants.

Where Once We Walked gives the population as 1,797 and locates it
62 km NNE of Chernivitsi at coordinates 48o46'/26o24'.

Hope this helps.

Doug Cohen
Sarasota, FL
Lexington, MA


New Vilnius Internal Passport Files Translated #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Some of you may be aware that Howard Margol has been ill. He has stepped
down as Coordinator of the LitvakSIG Internal Passport Project, which he
founded in 2007 after discovering these very valuable documents on a trip
to Lithuania.

I will be overseeing the completion of the translations of the Vilnius
Passports. Please direct any questions to me at <esjoachim@...>.

New Internal Passport files for the city of Vilnius have been added to the
Vilnius IP Shutterfly website,
<https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com>.

The files include 4,948 new records. If you are already a Qualified
Contributor to the Vilnius IP project, you may view the data by logging
into the website.

If you are not a Qualified Contributor to the Vilnius IP Project, you may do
so by contributing $100 to LitvakSIG. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and
choose Internal Passports under Special Projects.

This new data will become available in the All Lithuania Database 18 months
from now. At the same time, it becomes available in the JewishGen Lithuania
Database.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim
Records Acquisitions and Translations Committee
Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania New Vilnius Internal Passport Files Translated #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Some of you may be aware that Howard Margol has been ill. He has stepped
down as Coordinator of the LitvakSIG Internal Passport Project, which he
founded in 2007 after discovering these very valuable documents on a trip
to Lithuania.

I will be overseeing the completion of the translations of the Vilnius
Passports. Please direct any questions to me at <esjoachim@...>.

New Internal Passport files for the city of Vilnius have been added to the
Vilnius IP Shutterfly website,
<https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com>.

The files include 4,948 new records. If you are already a Qualified
Contributor to the Vilnius IP project, you may view the data by logging
into the website.

If you are not a Qualified Contributor to the Vilnius IP Project, you may do
so by contributing $100 to LitvakSIG. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and
choose Internal Passports under Special Projects.

This new data will become available in the All Lithuania Database 18 months
from now. At the same time, it becomes available in the JewishGen Lithuania
Database.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim
Records Acquisitions and Translations Committee
Internal Passport Project


Re: Germany, Hesse, Civil Registration, since 1874 #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for simplifying the matter. There are indeed several
ways to access the Hessian Archives' vital-records holdings.

One small detail, though: The Standesamt system did indeed begin on
October 1, 1874--but only in Prussia. The Hessian State Archives'
on-line collection begins on January 1, 1876, the day that all of
Germany went over to the new system. At that time, Prussia included the
state of Hessen-Nassau, but not the rest of today's Hessen. So where are
the Hessen-Nassau books for the first 15 months?

Why, at FamilySearch.org, of course! The originals are or were in the
Hessian State Archive in Marburg, where LDS filmed the collection of
miscellaneous vital records. That collection is now on line as "Germany,
Hesse-Nassau, Civil Registers and Church Books, 1701-1875." In reality,
it covers only the Kassel district of Hessen-Nassau.

As I mentioned a few posts ago, this collection is almost impossible to
use on line. The localities (over 500 of them) are listed
alphabetically, with few indications as to the county, etc. In Hessen
this can be vexing, given the number of places with non-unique names.
Note that the 1876ff. records are grouped by county (Kreis). In 4 cases,
a town and its records appear twice. A few town names are spelled wrong.

Within a locality, the records are grouped by author. Alas, this was
done inconsistently and often just plain wrong. Most of the 120
localities that have 1874-5 records have them listed under
"Standesamt"--but others are under "Buergermeisterei" or "Amtsgericht".
In one case, a book of birth records >from Huenfeld is cataloged under Fulda.

The 1874-5 Standesamt records are one of four main sets of records in
this collection. The other two are: civil vital records >from the era of
the Kingdom of Westphalia (c.1808-13); marriage contracts and annexes,
some going back even before 1701; and miscellaneous Jewish records,
mostly >from 1825-1874.

The Kingdom of Westphalia records are wonderful in their Napoleonic
detail, and in that they treat Jews like everyone else. In most places,
each denomination had its own registers, but the reporting was done the
same way for all. I have made great headway in researching my own family
by using these. Unfortunately, they are listed under any number of
different headings: Standesamt, Buergermeisterei, Justizamt,
Amtsgericht, and the various religious denominations. In some cases,
Jewish records are bound together with others without mention of them
being made; in others, purely Jewish records are listed as "Evangelisch."

The 1825-1874 Jewish (and "dissident") records, too, appear under many
different authorships: Polizeiamt, Buergermeisterei, Standesamt,
Juedische Gemeinde. Many of the descriptions (date, type of record) are
inaccurate, sometimes seriously understating the contents.

For those of us who worked on the Hessen Gatermann project, Phase 1, the
1825-1874 records are important in that they contain quite a few vital
registers that the Nazis missed! Especially in Schluechtern and
Ziegenhain counties (Kreise), there are many "other shoes" waiting to
drop. >from Schluechtern we have records for Mittelsinn, Heubach,
Hintersteinau, Salmünster, Sterbfritz, Vollmerz and Züntersbach; >from
Ziegenhain: Großropperhausen, Neukirchen, Röllshausen, Schrecksbach and
Ziegenhain itself. Rueckingen (Kr. Hanau), Eiterfeld (Kr. Huenfeld), and
Erksdorf and Schiffelsbach (Kr. Marburg) are also represented.

Finally, one should remember that the vast majority of Hessian and
Nassovian church books >from the 18th and 19th centuries are not included
here at all. They may be found in various diocesan and other archives in
Kassel, Fulda and elsewhere.

I have struggled in vain for over 2 years to bring these problems to the
attention (or rather, interest) of familysearch.org. The collection
would benefit greatly >from being broken up into a few sections, each of
which with a title that described its contents accurately and
succinctly; and >from being recataloged in a consistent manner.

By the way, there are no *intentional* restrictions on the use of this
collection...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/23/2015 3:20 PM, Gerhard Buck buckidstein@... wrote:
The confusion about how to find access to the Civil Vital Registers of
Hessen can easily be abolished. These Standesamtsregister begin in
1874, are still in use and belong to the Federal State of Hessen. The
older copies, which are no longer subject to privacy laws, have been
transferred to a new central archive since 2011. It is part of the
State Archive of Marburg. At the beginning, shelves with a length of
1,500 meters were needed.

To make the documents accessible to the public in the easiest possible
way, the State of Hessen has come to an agreement with FamilySearch.
This institution digitizes the whole and steadily growing collection
in the new archive. Two identical copies are in the course of being
published.

One copy is given to the State that publishes all of them on the joint
website of its archives. Until February 2015 its name was HADIS; since
then it is called Arcinsys. This website https://arcinsys.hessen.de is
accessible to everybody without any restrictions. There are two ways
to find the desired localities.

One was already mentioned by Roger Lustig. You first go to another
website with historical information about Hessen: LAGIS. With the
(English!) link http://www.lagis-hessen.de/en/subjects/index/sn/pstr
you are lead to the search function. The advantage of this indirect
way via LAGIS: you get an excellent survey of all the available places
and years to which you get with the next step.

The direct way is:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v282839
Here you find the register for all places.

Another copy of the digital images becomes the property of
FamilySearch. They have their own, less favorable rules concerning the
access which is influenced by the fact that this firm plans to index
all the entries.


German SIG #Germany Re: Germany, Hesse, Civil Registration, since 1874 #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for simplifying the matter. There are indeed several
ways to access the Hessian Archives' vital-records holdings.

One small detail, though: The Standesamt system did indeed begin on
October 1, 1874--but only in Prussia. The Hessian State Archives'
on-line collection begins on January 1, 1876, the day that all of
Germany went over to the new system. At that time, Prussia included the
state of Hessen-Nassau, but not the rest of today's Hessen. So where are
the Hessen-Nassau books for the first 15 months?

Why, at FamilySearch.org, of course! The originals are or were in the
Hessian State Archive in Marburg, where LDS filmed the collection of
miscellaneous vital records. That collection is now on line as "Germany,
Hesse-Nassau, Civil Registers and Church Books, 1701-1875." In reality,
it covers only the Kassel district of Hessen-Nassau.

As I mentioned a few posts ago, this collection is almost impossible to
use on line. The localities (over 500 of them) are listed
alphabetically, with few indications as to the county, etc. In Hessen
this can be vexing, given the number of places with non-unique names.
Note that the 1876ff. records are grouped by county (Kreis). In 4 cases,
a town and its records appear twice. A few town names are spelled wrong.

Within a locality, the records are grouped by author. Alas, this was
done inconsistently and often just plain wrong. Most of the 120
localities that have 1874-5 records have them listed under
"Standesamt"--but others are under "Buergermeisterei" or "Amtsgericht".
In one case, a book of birth records >from Huenfeld is cataloged under Fulda.

The 1874-5 Standesamt records are one of four main sets of records in
this collection. The other two are: civil vital records >from the era of
the Kingdom of Westphalia (c.1808-13); marriage contracts and annexes,
some going back even before 1701; and miscellaneous Jewish records,
mostly >from 1825-1874.

The Kingdom of Westphalia records are wonderful in their Napoleonic
detail, and in that they treat Jews like everyone else. In most places,
each denomination had its own registers, but the reporting was done the
same way for all. I have made great headway in researching my own family
by using these. Unfortunately, they are listed under any number of
different headings: Standesamt, Buergermeisterei, Justizamt,
Amtsgericht, and the various religious denominations. In some cases,
Jewish records are bound together with others without mention of them
being made; in others, purely Jewish records are listed as "Evangelisch."

The 1825-1874 Jewish (and "dissident") records, too, appear under many
different authorships: Polizeiamt, Buergermeisterei, Standesamt,
Juedische Gemeinde. Many of the descriptions (date, type of record) are
inaccurate, sometimes seriously understating the contents.

For those of us who worked on the Hessen Gatermann project, Phase 1, the
1825-1874 records are important in that they contain quite a few vital
registers that the Nazis missed! Especially in Schluechtern and
Ziegenhain counties (Kreise), there are many "other shoes" waiting to
drop. >from Schluechtern we have records for Mittelsinn, Heubach,
Hintersteinau, Salmünster, Sterbfritz, Vollmerz and Züntersbach; >from
Ziegenhain: Großropperhausen, Neukirchen, Röllshausen, Schrecksbach and
Ziegenhain itself. Rueckingen (Kr. Hanau), Eiterfeld (Kr. Huenfeld), and
Erksdorf and Schiffelsbach (Kr. Marburg) are also represented.

Finally, one should remember that the vast majority of Hessian and
Nassovian church books >from the 18th and 19th centuries are not included
here at all. They may be found in various diocesan and other archives in
Kassel, Fulda and elsewhere.

I have struggled in vain for over 2 years to bring these problems to the
attention (or rather, interest) of familysearch.org. The collection
would benefit greatly >from being broken up into a few sections, each of
which with a title that described its contents accurately and
succinctly; and >from being recataloged in a consistent manner.

By the way, there are no *intentional* restrictions on the use of this
collection...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/23/2015 3:20 PM, Gerhard Buck buckidstein@... wrote:
The confusion about how to find access to the Civil Vital Registers of
Hessen can easily be abolished. These Standesamtsregister begin in
1874, are still in use and belong to the Federal State of Hessen. The
older copies, which are no longer subject to privacy laws, have been
transferred to a new central archive since 2011. It is part of the
State Archive of Marburg. At the beginning, shelves with a length of
1,500 meters were needed.

To make the documents accessible to the public in the easiest possible
way, the State of Hessen has come to an agreement with FamilySearch.
This institution digitizes the whole and steadily growing collection
in the new archive. Two identical copies are in the course of being
published.

One copy is given to the State that publishes all of them on the joint
website of its archives. Until February 2015 its name was HADIS; since
then it is called Arcinsys. This website https://arcinsys.hessen.de is
accessible to everybody without any restrictions. There are two ways
to find the desired localities.

One was already mentioned by Roger Lustig. You first go to another
website with historical information about Hessen: LAGIS. With the
(English!) link http://www.lagis-hessen.de/en/subjects/index/sn/pstr
you are lead to the search function. The advantage of this indirect
way via LAGIS: you get an excellent survey of all the available places
and years to which you get with the next step.

The direct way is:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v282839
Here you find the register for all places.

Another copy of the digital images becomes the property of
FamilySearch. They have their own, less favorable rules concerning the
access which is influenced by the fact that this firm plans to index
all the entries.


Re: Unusual WWI Postcard #germany

naomi rosenthal <naomiro999@...>
 

My grandfather was a German soldier in WWI, and I have many military
postcards (with the inscription Feldpostkarte) >from that time, as well
as postcards written before the war by my grandfather in Hamburg to my
grandmother in Frankfurt >from 1898 until they married in 1906. >from these
I can tell you the following:

1) Postcards in Germany during that time had stamps >from both sending and
receiving towns.
2) Besides the dates, the stamps had other numbers on them, and my guess is
that these referred to the stamping post offices.

3) Military Feldpostkarten did not usually have postage stamps but were
only stamped, also when sent to civilians. I'm guessing this was more
convenient than carrying delicate postage stamps in the field.

There were many, many, war wounded, and there were probably not enough
military hospitals to accommodate them all, so they might also have been
placed in regular hospitals. The notice on the wall referring to the
care of war wounded would not have been necessary if the entire hospital
was for the military. Also, the photo shows a notice on the wall with
a cross on it, so I doubt it was a Jewish hospital.

Can't help with the old script. If you don't get help here,
the Suetterlinstube in Hamburg will transcribe.

Naomi M Rosenthal Berkeley, CA, US naomiro999@...
Author of Lina's Love (pre-WWI German postcards) and Searching for
Hugo (WWI German correspondence)

Jeffrey Knisbacher <j2456@...> wrote:
Subject: Unusual WWI Postcard >from Berlin to Linz, Austria on Viewmate
--help requested in reading the German and overall analysis

Actually, my first question is whether this card really is unusual?
Do any of you researchers have anything similar or have you seen
anything similar? <snip>
Here are the three URLs to see the three different views of the card:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41804
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41805
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41806


German SIG #Germany Re: Unusual WWI Postcard #germany

naomi rosenthal <naomiro999@...>
 

My grandfather was a German soldier in WWI, and I have many military
postcards (with the inscription Feldpostkarte) >from that time, as well
as postcards written before the war by my grandfather in Hamburg to my
grandmother in Frankfurt >from 1898 until they married in 1906. >from these
I can tell you the following:

1) Postcards in Germany during that time had stamps >from both sending and
receiving towns.
2) Besides the dates, the stamps had other numbers on them, and my guess is
that these referred to the stamping post offices.

3) Military Feldpostkarten did not usually have postage stamps but were
only stamped, also when sent to civilians. I'm guessing this was more
convenient than carrying delicate postage stamps in the field.

There were many, many, war wounded, and there were probably not enough
military hospitals to accommodate them all, so they might also have been
placed in regular hospitals. The notice on the wall referring to the
care of war wounded would not have been necessary if the entire hospital
was for the military. Also, the photo shows a notice on the wall with
a cross on it, so I doubt it was a Jewish hospital.

Can't help with the old script. If you don't get help here,
the Suetterlinstube in Hamburg will transcribe.

Naomi M Rosenthal Berkeley, CA, US naomiro999@...
Author of Lina's Love (pre-WWI German postcards) and Searching for
Hugo (WWI German correspondence)

Jeffrey Knisbacher <j2456@...> wrote:
Subject: Unusual WWI Postcard >from Berlin to Linz, Austria on Viewmate
--help requested in reading the German and overall analysis

Actually, my first question is whether this card really is unusual?
Do any of you researchers have anything similar or have you seen
anything similar? <snip>
Here are the three URLs to see the three different views of the card:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41804
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41805
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41806


Help with Details of an 1882 Romanian Marriage Certificate from Suceava #romania

Graeme Boocock
 

Hello. I would like to ask if someone can help me in understanding the
fine details of the Romanian marriage record linked below:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=41874

The marriage certificate is for Markus ABRAMOWITZ (here rendered
Marcus AVRAMOVICI), 1858-1930; and Fanny SONNENFELD (here rendered
Fani), 1859-1938. The precise words used to describe the two families
are different, which leads me to believe that different information is
provided. Based on my limited understanding, I think it says the
following.

Marcus Abvramovici
born in Botosani (Romania)
living in Iasi, son of
(?) Avram Avramovici
and Sure born Falicenier
27 years [of age]
(?)

Fani (?) Feige Sonnenfeld
born in Suceava, daughter of
(?) Uscher and
Sima Sonnenfeld
of Suceava
26 [years of age]
(?)

My main question is about the Avramovici family. Where it reads "Sure
nasc. Falicenier", is that an indication that the mother, Sure, was
*born* in Falticeni the town, or rather that her *maiden name* was
Falicenier? If the latter, is that the correct spelling? It does not
appear that the written name contains a "T" as in the town of
"Falticeni".

Whatever it says, I find it interesting that this information is
provided only for the Avramovici family, whereas for the Sonnenfleds
we are only told that they are "of Suceava". No additional details
for the mother, Sima, are provided.

Also, where "Fani" is written, is the next word telling us that she is
"also known as" "Feige, or is this an indication that her
original/birth name was Feige?

Thank you very much in advance,

Graeme Boocock

graeme.boocock@...
Ottawa, Canada


Romania SIG #Romania Help with Details of an 1882 Romanian Marriage Certificate from Suceava #romania

Graeme Boocock
 

Hello. I would like to ask if someone can help me in understanding the
fine details of the Romanian marriage record linked below:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=41874

The marriage certificate is for Markus ABRAMOWITZ (here rendered
Marcus AVRAMOVICI), 1858-1930; and Fanny SONNENFELD (here rendered
Fani), 1859-1938. The precise words used to describe the two families
are different, which leads me to believe that different information is
provided. Based on my limited understanding, I think it says the
following.

Marcus Abvramovici
born in Botosani (Romania)
living in Iasi, son of
(?) Avram Avramovici
and Sure born Falicenier
27 years [of age]
(?)

Fani (?) Feige Sonnenfeld
born in Suceava, daughter of
(?) Uscher and
Sima Sonnenfeld
of Suceava
26 [years of age]
(?)

My main question is about the Avramovici family. Where it reads "Sure
nasc. Falicenier", is that an indication that the mother, Sure, was
*born* in Falticeni the town, or rather that her *maiden name* was
Falicenier? If the latter, is that the correct spelling? It does not
appear that the written name contains a "T" as in the town of
"Falticeni".

Whatever it says, I find it interesting that this information is
provided only for the Avramovici family, whereas for the Sonnenfleds
we are only told that they are "of Suceava". No additional details
for the mother, Sima, are provided.

Also, where "Fani" is written, is the next word telling us that she is
"also known as" "Feige, or is this an indication that her
original/birth name was Feige?

Thank you very much in advance,

Graeme Boocock

graeme.boocock@...
Ottawa, Canada


Final resting place of Theresia FELDMANN #austria-czech

pheilbrunn@...
 

Hi,

I am trying to trace the last resting place of my aunt Theresia/Therese
FELDMANN born 13th December 1897 in Vienna, Austria to Wilhelm and Bertha
FELDMANN. The facts as I know them are;
She emigrated to Palestine before WW2 though the date is unknown
She was married but again I do not know whether she married in Austria
and emigrated or else met her husband in Palestine. I have searched the IKW
records in Vienna and couldn't find any marriage record.
She was living in Haifa in 1960 with her husband but had no children.
The date of her death is unknown.
I am hoping that someone can help me check the death records and or burial
records for Haifa >from 1960 to say 1985 and that these records might contain
either her maiden name of FELDMANN or that the name Theresia/Therese and her
date of birth are matched.
Any advice or help is greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Peter Heilbrunn
Amersham, England


Prostejov #austria-czech

mbeer@...
 

Dear people,
I am one of the few Prostejov Jewish citizens still alive.
I live in Tel Aviv, have visited Prostejov in the last years by myself, with
my children and grandchildren.
I have a good memory and remember still much, especially events and people
from my childhood which was so cruelly terminated.
Maud Michal Beer.