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Re: Romania Research Division Update #romania #announcements #records #JewishGenUpdates

Awesome Properties
 

Hi! I am extremely excited to this new update! 
I need advice and assistance regarding a record from Velente Cemetery in Oradea Romania. Where can I find can additional info - last name etc. for the attached record? Or who can I contact for assistance? Thinking this might be my gggfather.  Alexander Zisha FriedmanAny info might lead me past a huge brick wall.
Velente Cemetery serial# 932zone #L stone # 39
Thank you ,
Rachel Malik


Information on Levin Family in Lithuania #lithuania

William Levine
 

Hi all.  Below are four  Levin family members.   Yakov Levin (below) is my great-grandfather who I have ample information on from his birth record below to life events in Boston MA where he settled with his wife Bessie in 1888.  The other three entries below are his 1 brother and 2 sisters. I have not been able to find any additional records for them. I have searched on the Jewish Gen Lithuania databases without any luck and also found nothing on these 3 on Ancestry.  I sent an email to a Levin Family researcher in Lithuania but got no replay. I feel then that I have come to a dead end on researching these three family members so any advice for alternative sources would be much appreciated 
Thanks
Bill Levine



LEVIN, Yakov

Efraim, Yakov 


Liba, Shmuel 


10/7/1867


19 Tammuz 

Bagaslaviskis 


Vilnius 


Vilnius 

Father was a shoemaker. Brit on 26 Tammuz by Rabbi Pinchas LANTSMAN.

Bagaslaviskis 


1867 


M5 

2205023 / 6 


1024 


LVIA/728/3/211











LEVIN, Nechama Sheyna

Efraim, Yakov 


Liba, Moshe 


TEPER 

12/10/1864


24 Tishrei 

Bagaslaviskis 


Vilnius 


Vilnius 

Father was a shoemaker.

Bagaslaviskis 


1864 


F10 

2187654 / 2 


339 


LVIA/728/1/874 









LEVIN, Beyle Freyde

Efraim, Yakov 


Libe, Shmuel 


3/1/1855


25 Tevet 

Bagaslaviskis 


Vilnius 


Vilnius 

Father was a shoemaker; maternal grandfather, a potter.

Bagaslaviskis 


1855 


F1 

2157999 / 3 



LVIA/728/1/130 








LEVIN, Shlome Ruvn

Efraim 


Liba, Shmuel 


 

19/7/1862


4 Av 

Bagaslaviskis 


Vilnius 


Vilnius 

Father was a town dweller. Brit on 11 Av by Rabbi Pinchas LANTSMAN.

Bagaslaviskis 


1862 


M5 

2187652 / 1 


 


LVIA/728/1/689 


Re: Natan Noteh equivalent to one name? #names

Alan Cohen
 

My grandfather was born in month of Nissan and named Chaim Nissan. He had a younger brother named Nathan (Natan). So no equivalence there.
 
Alan Cohen


Re: Why Various Spellings of A Family Name #names

EdrieAnne Broughton
 

On top of the reasons Meredith Hoffman gives for spelling variations, you can add 21st Century transcriptions of 19th Century penmanship.  My husband has Serings and Serrings that are often interpreted as Lering and Lerring.  If you go to the page of the census or marriage and actually see the document you can tell the difference.  The initial loop of the S starts on the bottom line while the L starts halfway up, otherwise the letters are identical.  You have to search both letter versions....then look at the document.  
 
EdrieAnne Broughton
Vacaville, California


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #poland

Bruce Drake
 

In this chapter from the Yizkor book of book of Zloczew, Poland, Israel Katz relates this scene from a wedding: the bride among her women friends while in the next room, there were only men, speaking of Torah. “None of the men even cast an eye towards the women, who – as appropriate for women – were busy with 'silly matters.'”
“Women of Zloczew” is a portrait of the woman’s place in the Jewish shtetl, playing a role that was subservient to men but, at the same time, the very foundation of family life. A man went to Cheder and studied the Torah and became the head of his household. “The woman had to be a loyal servant for him, and run his household, bear his children, and was a help for him, or many times she herself was the one who worked for a living. For all that, her entire reward was the pleasure she had that her husband earned respect or that he was given a prominent Aliyah.” For the morning till night household chores, “the day was too short.” And, she would often help earn the family’s living. When she gave birth to a child, the father was the recipient of pats on the back and mazel tovs, with friends “winking with their eyes as to what an accomplishment he had achieved.”
Katz tells of a young woman on her wedding throne as an entertainer sang a melody that started with the line “Cry, dear bride, cry”… and the bride actually was able to cry, because at that moment when her throne was dismantled after the wedding, her relative freedom was ended.”


--
Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: request for gravestone picture at Mt. Hebron Flushing, NY #photographs

David Jacobowitz
 

You can put in a photo request at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/77068264/rose-heffler.

David Jacobowitz


Re: Why Various Spellings of A Family Name #names

sharon yampell
 

I have numerous instances on my tree where there are various spellings of the family’s last name; including one where there at least a dozen different variations…  This actually can be helpful when you see first names in a family that all look like they could be your family even if the last name does not appear to the be the one you have been searching for.  I have found using the more unique  spellings to help me find the other unique spellings…if the first names, time periods, and locations seems right, don’t get hung up because the last name is not exactly how you THINK it should be…

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, New Jersey

 

From: M Thatcher via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Friday, March 19, 2021 7:00 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Why Various Spellings of A Family Name

 

My ancestors family name has so far been found to be spelt wrong De Fratis, Defrytis and so on this has made it very difficult to trace the family back to their origins in Europe.

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com


--
MALCOLM THATCHER

 

 


Re: Natan Noteh equivalent to one name? #names

binyaminkerman@...
 

Just to clarify the name Nissan (ניסן) is pronounced like the car company "Nee-sahn" whether Ashkenazi or Sephardi, while the closest pronunciation of Natan (נתן) I can imagine might be "Ni-sin" where the sound is like the beginning of the word nickel.
Binyamin Kerman
Baltimore MD


Re: Restoration of German Citizenship #germany

David Seldner
 

Josh,
Honorary consulates are not really that informed. There is a lot of info on the Internet, you only have to tell them "Grundgesetz Artikel 116, Abs. 2"

Unfortunately, this page is onyl in German but I remember to have seen similar information in English, too.
https://www.bva.bund.de/DE/Services/Buerger/Ausweis-Dokumente-Recht/Staatsangehoerigkeit/Einbuergerung/Anspruch/EinbuergerungA_node.html
--
David Seldner, Karlsruhe, Germany
seldner@...


Re: Natan Noteh equivalent to one name? #names

binyaminkerman@...
 

There is an entirely separate name Nissan (ניסן) which is not as common (it might be slightly more common in certain Chassidik or Sephardic circles). But, like Adam said, depending on the accent the name Natan (נתן) could possibly end up sounding similar, I just don't know of the area that would pronounce it that way.
Binyamin Kerman
Baltimore MD


Re: Natan Noteh equivalent to one name? #names

billie.stein@...
 

Nissan, Nissim and Natan are 3 different names.
Nissan ניסן is usually someone who was born during that month (or named for someone who was born in Nissan).
Natan נתן - in English transliterated as Nathan - pronounced in Ashkenazic pronunciation as Nossen or Noosen.
Nissim ניסים or נסים which translates as miracles.
There are no rules, but Nissan is more likely to be of Ashkenazic descent, and Nissim - Sephardic.

Billie Stein
Givatayim, Israel


surname translation #yiddish #ukraine #names #russia

Family and DNA
 

'beekeeper' in Yiddish?

background - My father's grandfather & GGF were born in Czernigov/Chernihiv, moved for some reason to Romny (Poltava), then to Chicago. GGF Abraham (son of Pinkus) arrived in 1882 as BENJAN -- although he returned when his wife and at least 1 daughter were killed in a pogrom apparently while trying to follow him (some time between 1887-1897, no info ever found on that story). Abe remarried in Romny (as BENIN), had some more kids, & returned to Chicago in 1908. He was a big proponent of the Hebrew language, and felt that it should be used on a daily basis for secular stuff, and was apparently quite religious (& felt that folks in Chicago lacked that).

Everyone we know about arrived in Chicago between 1904-1910 as BENIN (kids were Yitchak/Isaac, Zelik Mordechai/Jacob Max, Berl/Benjamin, Sore/Sarah, Pinchas/Phillip; then Mera/Mary, Shia Refael/Jacob John, Riwl/Rose Leah, Zalmen/Sam).

Afterwards, all of them went by BERLAND. A 2nd cousin has said that "the first sibling that arrived [Ike] decided to change the name and everybody followed"... However, he just found an old tape of Rose where she says that it was actually Phil who chose the name (not the 1st to arrive), & that the original name BENIN has something to do with beekeeping in Yiddish. Does this sound correct?

(Apparently 'Berland' was chosen because of 'berlyant', the Yiddish word for diamond, & I think this works with Beider's name info in re the surname 'Berland')

They were almost all painters or sold paint. I've found other BENINs on the 1923 Romny census who were "tradesmen from Czernigow" --- I'm wondering how painting & being "tradesmen" could connect to bees, if at all. I had suspected that when it came time to chose a name, 'Benin' was a form of the given name 'Benjamin' -- but maybe not, & it had to do with bees instead? Or could it be tied to something in Hebrew, since Abe was so connected to that language? I do not speak/read Hebrew, Yiddish, or Russian, so I hope you can offer some advice... Any thoughts on this surname 'Benin'?

Juliana Berland (currently in Rennes, France)


--
Galicia: BADER, BADIAN, FELDMANN, FREIDENHEIM/FREUDENHEIM, GERTLER, WIENER/WEINER * Germany: ADELSDORFER, BÄR/BAER, EPSTEINN, HAUSSMAN, ISSAK, MEYER, MOSES, ROSENSTEIN * Russia: AMBURG, BENIN/BERLAND, BERKOVICH/BERKOWITZ, EPSTEIN, GELBURD/GOLDBERG/GAYLBURD/GILBERT


Re: Help with Address - Pinsk #belarus #poland

Alan Shuchat
 

There is a map of the Pinsk ghetto showing that street at https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/belarus/pinskghetto.htm
--
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka), Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Re: family of Abraham and Judes (Yehudith) Grunberg #holocaust

Myra Fournier
 

Hi, Milton:
I have Gruenbergs on my family tree too.
My maternal great-grandmother was Jenny Pelz (nee Gruenberg). She died in Auschwitz.
As Gruenberg is a fairly common name, not sure if there's a connection.
Would be happy to discuss further if you contact me at mjfourn@....
I could send you a screenshot of the Gruenbergs in my family tree.
Good luck with your search.
Myra Fournier
Bedford, MA


Re: Natan Noteh equivalent to one name? #names

Adam Turner
 

If "Nissan" is not equivalent to "Natan", it's news to me. As I understand it, "Nissan", "Nussen," etc. are just various Ashkenazi pronounciations of Natan (נתן). Typical standard Hebrew pronunciation is generally based on Sephardic pronunciation: the letter ת is generally pronounced as "t": "shabbat". But Eastern Europeans generally pronounce the same letter, ת, as "s": "shabbos".  So the standard Hebrew Natan is the same name as the Ashkenazi Nussen; "Nissan" is also the same, just with the vowels shifted because different Yiddish dialects pronounce vowels differently. (I think "Nissan" is more of a southeastern Yiddish pronunciation while "Nussen" is closer to Litvish, but perhaps someone more familiar with the various dialect differences can clarify this.)

For the same reason, the Hebrew name Yehudit (יְהוּדִית) also has the variations Yehudis, Hodes, Hudes, etc.

Adam Turner


Re: Wolk family of Lithuania #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

David try searching the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database ALD. you would find a number of WOLK family information from Petkunai. 
Also if you search family name WOLK on the JewishGen Family Finder and add Lithuania as the country, you will find 50+ entires.
Good luck with your quest.
Carol Hoffman
Tel Aviv


Re: Why Various Spellings of A Family Name #names

Diane Jacobs
 

I had the same problem. My family was Singman in NYC and Washington DC . They arrived in 1888 from Vilna as Schimkov but with the help of a native Russian who suggested the name Sinko I was able to find the many extended family using The All Lithuania Database from Gelvonai, Sirvintos and Jonava. I am now finding the living descendants of those who came to the US and now live in NYC, Memphis, Baltimore, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and more.
Unfortunately, even Yad Vashem produced results.

Diane Jacobs


On Mar 18, 2021, at 4:20 PM, Adelle Gloger via groups.jewishgen.org <agloger=AOL.COM@...> wrote:


This discussion has centered around variant spellings of surnames. It isn't just spellings, it could also be pronunciation of that name.
 My late mother-in-law who arrived in NYC in 1906 (8 years old) showed up on the 1910 US Census, and on her naturalization documents in the early 1940s indicating the name with which she entered  the country was HAMSHANSKY.  For years I searched that name, and came up empty handed.
 
Years ago on one of the JewishGen digests someone, in general, suggested repeating the name with, in this case, a Russian/Yiddish accent. I did just that and found, not only my mother-in-law and her brothers, but two older sisters who had arrived here several years earlier. The name was -- CHRAMZENKE. When I found the passenger list, that was the name listed. Incidentally, somewhere the family name became ORCHEN.  Go figure!!
 
Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
agloger@...

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Triangulating matches #dna

mandy.molava@...
 

Does anyone use anything in particular for triangulating to determine family lines?
I'm forever trying to find easier ways, a spreadsheet is working for me personally at the moment, as you can see the gaps or not, but wondered if there are any other options? I like tools on some of the sites, but can take a lot of time up studying, some have worked and some not.

Thanks in advance

Mandy Molava
Research Brest Russia Galacia and much more


Re: We believe we are related, but DNA doesn't show connection... ??? KLEPFISZ #poland #warsaw #dna

mandy.molava@...
 

I actually find some of DNA so infuriating, but sometimes you can get very lucky. Are you both on any other DNA site? I've had some success doing that, Ancestry has taken away very small cm matches to one of my family's accounts I found out, but not to mine for some reason? So I've been able to find a couple that are matched with a direct line, the more sites you're on IMHO the more matches you have/wider search. 

I like GEDmatch (free) for a comparison, which I believe is more 'scientific', it goes a bit deeper, shows clearer generations and has tools for searches to use to look at matches also, so I try and encourage as many as possible to go on that one.


Mandy Molava
Researching Brest Russia Galacia and much more.


Re: Help with Address - Pinsk #belarus #poland

Gerald and Margaret
 

There is a Pinsk in Belarus, so I suggest you contact The Together Plan, which is a charity based in London and Minsk which aims to help Jews still living in Belarus become self-sufficient.  One of their projects is genealogical research.  They have the advantage of speaking the relevant languages, plus know how to navigate the local bureaucracy ..

www.thetogetherplan.org.uk

Happy hunting,

Margaret Levin
London N3, UK

8561 - 8580 of 665465