Date   

Re: What’s in a name #names

Judith Singer
 

Hello - 1. Bunim is a recognized name and in fact at least one illustrious rabbi was named Bunim. I don't think there is any closure on the question of whether it was a contracted nickname for Benjamin or an adopted name from the French "bon homme", good man. It often appears as the kinnui (associated given name to a particular Hebrew name) for Simcha. 

2. A patronymic name is one based on a father's first name, e.g. Zalmanson in your example. Depending on when your Levi Titchak lived, Zalman might have been his father's name, if Zalmanson was adopted directly in response to a law requiring Jews to acquire surnames (in 1804 in Russia, for example, though it took decades for many Russian Jews to conform to that law). Again, depending on when he lived, Zalman might have been a grandfather's or great-grandfather's first name.  
3. As far as I know, it was not standard practice in any location for sons to take on the surnames of the father and mothers to take the surnames of the mother. If you are working from Polish records, last names can be particularly confusing because in many cases clerks recorded the birth using the mother's name, I believe because the marriage had been only a religious ceremony and not also a civil one, but it's not consistent. Sometimes if you're lucky, a clerk will record both parents' surnames and that can help you figure out relationships.
good luck - Judith Singer


Re: Kiev Tzesarskaya #ukraine

Mike Coleman
 

Hi Samuel,

This recent thread on this site may help regarding Michael :

https://groups.jewishgen.org/g/main/topic/81120240

So far I've used only the obd-memorial.ru database but it provided amazing, and very helpful, information.

Good luck.

Mike Coleman    London (U.K.)


Re: Bessarabia New project - immigration to South America #bessarabia

Paulo A Abrahamsohn
 

Hello Salmo. I got some immigration data and documents regarding Brazil by searching at My Heritage. It is probable to get this information by searching also in other Genealogy sites. I can be of help if you wish to search for people buried in  Jewish cemeteries in Brazil. Best regards . Paulo Abrahamsohn. São Paulo. Brazil.


Re: Does DNA prove that Jews are a race? #dna

SamPam Hausfather
 

I would suggest the book "LEGACY: A Genetic History of the Jewish People" by Harry Ostrer, which provides some good insights to various science and neo-science approaches to defining the Jewish people. Much interesting history as well. 

Sam Hausfather
Asheville, NC, USA

Researching HAUSFATHER in Romania, KWEKSILBER in Poland, KRANTZ in Galicia, ZELTZER in Bessarabia


Re: Searching LECHNER Cousins #ukraine

Janet Furba
 

Hi ask the archives of the place.
Janet Furba,
Germany


Re: Origin of the word 'Peruvian' to describe jewws on the doamond nad goldfields #southafrica #general

Arlene Beare
 

Jews from Eastern Europe who came after the German immigration to SA formed a club called in Yiddish the Palisher and Russisher Verein (unsure of spelling) abbreviated to PARUV,. They were then caller Peruvniks which was a derogatory term and anglicised to Peruvian.  I was aware of this but checked and found this online-
Peruvian or Peruvnik..originated in Kimberley during the Diamond Rush Days...The Jews from Eastern Europe were looked down upon by English and German Jews. The Polish and Russian Jews were of course excluded from the Kimberley club so they formed their own club which they called Polish And Russian Union. The acronym is Paru, which was and still is an expression of contempt and an assertion of superiority on the part of those using the word.’ (D. Schrire, Letter, 2 May 1989). 
Arlene Beare UK

Dorfman (born Birzai Lithuania then Riga)  Scher/Blum(born Pandelys Lithuania then Riga) Berman (born Lygumai Lithuania then Jekabpils Latvia
Samuels - UK  Trzmil,Ring and  Dembinski  Zychlin Poland

 


Re: u.k marriage certificate of eli roberg & Roseliane Brandeiss #unitedkingdom

john_gross@...
 

Hi
Searching is free but obtaining a certificate is chargeable.  The GRO or General Register Office is the site to visit and the following web site addresses will give further guidance and costs:
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/faq.asp
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/images/Marriage%20Cert%20PDF.pdf

Good luck with your searching.
John Gross UK


Re: NYC Cemeteries - Offering Mt Hebron #photographs #usa

Moishe Miller
 

It is perfectly safe.
The cemetery is located in the middle of what is now an orthodox Jewish area.
--

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@...
JGFF #3391


Re: What language are these two letters, posted on ViewMate written in? #translation

Ralph Baer
 

The first is in German. I don't recognize the second.
--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Romania Research Division Has a New Website #romania #JewishGenUpdates

Michael Moritz
 

I'm excited to announce the new website of the JewishGen Romania Research Division, which replaces a very outdated website of nearly two decades. The new website is modernized up to modern standards and is mobile friendly. The site has a significant amount of information -- including a new project: historical English-language newspaper articles -- and will continue to be updated. The site is available at www.JewishGen.org/Romania.

Please let me know if you have any questions, thanks. 

Michael Moritz (New York)
Director, Romania Research Division
mmoritz@...


New Book about Polish-Jewish Relations during WW II in Ciechanowiec area #poland

Jrbaston
 

Those of you who attended the IAJGS Warsaw Conference in 2018, and especially
the JRI-Poland luncheon, will remember Ciechanowiec Mayor Miroslaw Reczko,
who spoke at the luncheon on "Time for Serious Research into What Occurred in
Polish Shtetlach During WWI," and additionally, on Jewish-Polish Relations from
1939-41 in the Southern Bialystok Region."

Dr. Reczko has clearly done that serious research about which he spoke, and has
just published the English translation of his book, “How the Devil Enlarged His
Kingdom: Polish-Jewish Relations in One of the Polish Shtetlach During World
War II,” which focuses mostly on Ciechanowiec but also contains information
about what happened in many of the towns and villages during that period. This
important book will be of interest to people with connections to Ciechanowiec and
the surrounding area.

In his tireless research preparing this work, Dr. Reczko was able to obtain previously
unavailable documents, which provided new information for his book.

The book is available at
https://www.amazon.com/HOW-DEVIL-ENLARGED-KINGDOM-POLISH-JEWISH/dp/6203029408

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA, USA

Susan Stone
Stamford, CT, USA


Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

Adam Cherson
 

Earlier today I was reading an article in the freely available Jewish Encyclopedia (https://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1037-akiba-ha-kohen-of-ofen) and at the end of the article I saw this as the source of the information in the article:

Bibliography:
  • Frumkin, Eben Shemuel, pp. 111 et seq.;
I would like to try to access this book, which I take to be called Eben Shemuel (or perhaps published by Eben Shemuel) by a person named Frumkin. I've tried some general online searches using this string but didn't find such a book. Is there a way to get a more complete citation in the Jewish Encyclopedia? Since the online version is presented only as a group of searchable articles, I cannot seem to access a section of the Encyclopedia where all the bibliographical references might be listed, perhaps more expansively with the name of the publisher, year, and place of publication, etc. Has anyone been able to delve further into books listed at the end of Jewish Encyclopedia articles? How may I proceed?

--
Adam Cherson
--
Adam Cherson


Offering to take photos in Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn #photographs #usa

Yehuda Rubin
 

I am available on a short term basis to photograph graves of your choice in Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn. (Willing to do multiple graves of the same name, if you're not sure which one is your relative.) I will require plot numbers in order to find the grave, as there is no database online.
While I will do this for free should I be there for other purposes, a pay-what-you-wish fee is appreciated.
I can be emailed at yehudazevrubin@..., should you have any questions.

Yehuda Rubin


Re: Info on Jewish refugees in Central Asia during the War #ukraine

viferra@outlook.com
 

I was not able to obtain the article mentioned by Sherri Bobish using the link she provided, but if you enter the title Paradise Lost? Postwar Memory of Polish Jewish Survival in the Soviet Union into Google Scholar, the result has a link on the right to a downloadable PDF.  This worked for me.

Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi
Belmont, CA, USA


Bruno Surname #names

rickyramo@...
 

Hello, My name is Enrique Ramos. I am adopted and I am researching my biological family in Puerto Rico. The Brunos in Puerto Rico are one surname and live in the towns of Toa Baja, Toa Alta, Vega Baja, Vega Baja, all in Puerto Rico. They seem to have arrived from Italy, Portugal or Spain. Can somebody help me on information on any Bruno who travelled to Puerto Rico in the 1400 to the 1800? If anyone can help me I will truly appreciate it.
Enrique R. Ramos


Invitation to Zoom meeting: "Town Counsel: Finding Your Ancestor's European Town of Origin" with Emily Garber #events #jgs-iajgs #announcements

Ben Kempner
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Southern Nevada (JGSSN) invites you to a Zoom meeting at 1:00 p.m. (Pacific Daylight Time) on Sunday, April 18: "Town Counsel: Finding Your Ancestor's European Town of Origin" with Emily Garber

 

To request a Zoom link, please complete this short form: Zoom Link Request.

 

Members of JGSSN can attend for free.  Non-members can either pay $5.00 on the Donate page. Or you can pay $20 for a subscription to the 2021 series of outstanding speakers (see below).  More detail can be found on our Meetings page.  To become a member and sign up for the 2021 series, go to the Membership page.

 

Session Description:

 

One of the most important building blocks of Jewish genealogy research is determining our ancestors’ communities of origin, especially where those places are on today’s maps. Because records were (and are) often kept at local, municipal level or regional levels, successful genealogical research depends upon knowing our ancestors’ correct communities of residence. One cannot successfully jump the pond to Eastern Europe with one’s research until one has established location information from immigrant ancestors’ and relatives’ records in their adopted countries.

 

About Emily Garber:

 

An archaeologist by training (B.A., Vassar College; M.A., University of New Mexico), Emily Garber is a professional genealogy researcher, writer and speaker who specializes in Jewish genealogical research.  She has researched both Eastern European and German Jewish communities and immigrants to the United States and Great Britain. She has toured family shtetlach (communities) and explored archives in Ukraine.
 
After retiring from her 30+ year career in natural resources management, Emily earned a certificate from Boston University's Genealogical Research program. She has spoken at eight International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies conferences and at the National Genealogical Society’s virtual conference. She has presented talks and seminars throughout the United States, and in Israel and Poland. In the summer of 2020, she coordinated the week-long seminar at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, “Introduction to Jewish Genealogy.” She has authored three articles published in Avotaynu: The International Review of Jewish Genealogy and, for a client, completed two privately published volumes chronicling the 300-year history of a German Jewish family. She writes a family history blog, The Extra Yad (
https://extrayad.blogspot.com/).
 
Emily serves on the board of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. She is also Chair of the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group and is on the boards of the Arizona Jewish Historical Society as well as JewishGen’s Ukraine and Romania Research Groups. She was one of the moderators of the JewishGen Discussion Group for about 10 years.

JGSSN 2021 Lecture Series:

 

Become a member for $20 and attend any or all of the upcoming lectures - https://www.jgssn.org/membership.html:

 



 

Ben Kempner

Vice President, JGSSN


What’s in a name#names

hsalmenson@...
 

1:One of my assumed relatives is Levi Yitchak Bunim Zalmanson. Is Bunim a recognized name or does it have another meaning?
2: What is a patronymic name?
3: Was it standard for sons to take on the surname of the father and for daughters to take the surname of the mother?

Thanks in advance.
Herman Salmenson


ViewMate translation request - Russian/Ukrainian #translation #ukraine

@mbserber
 

I've posted a record in Russian (or possibly Ukrainian) for which I need a translation. I'm looking for a literal translation of the entire document, if possible. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM93059
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

--
Michael Serber
Plymouth, Minnesota
mbserber@...


Re: Does DNA prove that Jews are a race? #dna

gomedoc@...
 

Racism is the lowest, most crudely primitive form of collectivism. It is the notion of ascribing moral, social or political significance to a man’s genetic lineage—the notion that a man’s intellectual and characterological traits are produced and transmitted by his internal body chemistry. Which means, in practice, that a man is to be judged, not by his own character and actions, but by the characters and actions of a collective of ancestors.  Ayn Rand


Information on Maiden Names, Thank You #ukraine

S.raskin@...
 

On Thu, Feb 4, 1999 at 01:53 PM, "molly gordy" <mgordy@...> wrote:
RASKIN (Ekaterinaslav).
Have you found information about RASKIN in Ekaterinaslav.

salmo raskin

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