Date   

Re: What’s in a name #names

Sherri Bobish
 

Herman,

At www.familysearch.org the surname BUNIM gets 505 hits.
Database did not allow searching as first name only.

On The Ellis Island Database https://stevemorse.org/ellis2/ellisgold.html
the first name BUNIM gets 15 hits.  No hits for BUNIM as surname.  But, there are variations of Bunimowicz.

It was common in Galica for couples to marry religiously, but not civilly, and civil birth records often listed the child under the mother's surname rather that the father's.

Patronymic can refer to a surname created from a male ancestor's first name by adding a suffix.

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish


Minnesota JGS Virtual meeting featuring Ken Bravo, "You've done your DNA, now what?"Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:00 PM-2:30 PM CDT #announcements #dna #events

casson123@...
 

Many of us have sent our DNA for analysis, curious about what we might find. We receive an ethnicity estimate and a long list of matches ranging from 2nd cousins to more distant ones.  Sometimes we are contacted by people on the list of matches who are trying to decipher the relationship. Who are these people? And how do we make sense of their relationship to us?
Ken Bravo, president of IAJGS, will discuss these questions and strategies for furthering your DNA-based research.
Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:00 PM-2:30 PM CDT
For further information and to register, go to 
mnjgs.org/events
--
Liba Casson-Nudell
Minneapolis, MN


Re: NYC Cemeteries - Offering Mt Hebron #photographs #usa

Ronni Nass
 

Hi, I’m interested in getting a photo of Mechel Glazerman.  I don’t know where in Washington Cemetery but will try to find out.
Thanks, Ronni Nass
Researching:  EPSZTAJN, LEWENBERG, CHONOWICZ, ZYLBERMINC, JELEN, MILKIS, SCHWARCZ


Re: Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

Adam Cherson
 

Thanks very much to the kind folks who took the time to assist. I have located the book. I also learned that the author was the founder of Petach Tikva (built the first house there and drained the swamp), obviously a person of many talents.
--
Adam Cherson


Tomorrow's Forum for Dialogue Zoom: Krakow Holocaust Survivor Tells Her Story #announcements #holocaust

Mark Halpern
 

Please join me tomorrow, Tuesday, April 6 at 10 am Pacific, 12 pm Central, 1 pm Eastern, 6 pm UK, 8 pm Israel time, for the Forum's Yom HaShoah program.

Mark Halpern

 
View this email in your browser
 

Dear Mark,

I would like to remind you of tomorrow's meeting with Janet Applefield, a Holocaust Survivor born in Krakow, Poland, and a clinical social worker and counselor living in the United States. On the eve of Yom HaShoah, we want to embrace the power of personal stories and create a space for them to reverberate. We will be honored to be able to hear Janet Applefield's story and reflections on this special Zoom in on the Forum session. 
 
Join us tomorrow, on  Tuesday April 6th, at 10 am Pacific, 12 pm Central, 1 pm Eastern, 7 pm Warsaw, 8 pm Tel-Aviv time

REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM

I hope you will be with us tomorrow to listen to Janet's personal history: her childhood years in Nowy Targ and Krakow, her family's fate after the outbreak of the Second World War, surviving the occupation with a Polish Catholic family and leaving post-war Poland for the States in 1947. Janet Applefield's powerful biography is an impactful lesson in dignity, humanity, and resilience in the face of evil. 

Yours,
Olga

Olga Kaczmarek
Director General


Re: Looking for grandparents RACHEL SALINSKY #unitedkingdom

Sherri Bobish
 

Janice,

I assume that you've searched www.familysearch.org and seen a Rachel Salinsky (married) on the UK 1901 census, and another Rachel Salinsky (a child) on the UK 1911 census.  There is also a 1926 marriage record for a Rachel Salinsky in The UK.

I also see a Rachel Zelensky and a Rachel Silinsky.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri BOBISH


Re: Understanding Lithuanian Revision Lists #lithuania

Sherri Bobish
 

Steve,

A few of my family were still listed on Russian Empire revision lists after they had arrived in New York. In these cases they were each listed as "missing" on the revision list.  This was in Ariogala, Lithuania (at that time part of The Russian Empire.)

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish


Genealogy in Belgium #general

David Lewin
 

Is there anyone on the list familiar with genealogical research in
Belgium please?

I am searching for members of a BOCHNER family

David Lewin
London


Re: Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

Schonfeld.family@...
 


Re: Bessarabia New project - immigration to South America #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello Salmo,

 

I hope that Teleshti is in fact Teleneshty, and if so, we do have some records from that place in our JewishGen/Bessarabia database. I also recommend you to post a message at the Discussion group with hashtage #bessarabia with the surnames/names/years  you are researching.   There are members interested in Bessarabia who might have same names/towns in their family trees.

 

All the best,

Yefim Kogan

JewishGen Bessarabia Group Leader and Coordinator


Re: Moving Frequently Among Ukraine Towns #ukraine

Stefani Elkort Twyford
 

Herbert, 
This post was very interesting to me. It was told that my great-grandfather "had a tavern and made vishnick." When he came to NYC in 1906, according to his shipping record, he had $600 on him. That was an amazing amount of money at that time. Could these shenkers have made that kind of money doing what they did?
--
Stefani Elkort Twyford
Researching: Siegal/Segal, Spiel, Tarle, Ilkovics, Feiermann, Kronenberg, Szerman, Kletzel, Ricker/Ricken


Re: Kiev Tzesarskaya #ukraine

Marc Friedman
 

Samuel:

Are you aware of any connection to the Tsesaski family from Panevezys, Lithuania?  (Tsesarskaya is a feminine form.)

Please respond to me privately.  

Marc.Friedman
Marc.friedman@...
Researching in Lithuania: Abramowitz/Friedman - Pasvalys; Tsesarski - Panevezys; Frankenstein - Wilkowisk 


Re: Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

Bob Kosovsky
 

When seeking books, one of the best online places to go is Worldcat.org, a
product of the library vendor OCLC which provides cataloging information
for thousands of libraries in the United States, Canada, Japan, and many
places in Europe. A search on the title Eben Shemuel revealed more book
information at:

https://www.worldcat.org/search?q=ti%3AEben+Shemuel&qt=advanced&dblist=638

Often (but not always) OCLC will indicate which specific libraries have
the book. In this case the first record showed a library in Zurich, and
the second record did not indicate a holding library. But since it's an
older book (1874) it probably doesn't show up because many libraries have
not yet converted their older records to an online format. I would
enquire of excellent Hebrew Jewish libraries near you and see if they have
the item. If that fails, you can always inquire of the library in Zurich.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


Re: Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

peggyfreedman@...
 

I searched just The Jewish Encyclopedia for "Frumkin, Eben Shemuel" and found this additional information by looking at other articles that include him in the bibliography:
  • Frumkin, Eben Shemuel, Wilna, 1874.
I did not look at all 39 articles that quoted him, but perhaps one of them has more information.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, GA USA


Re: Netherlands- Drents Archif Looking into Expropriation of Jewish Property from World War ll #holocaust #records

r.peeters
 

Goedemiddag,
 Wellicht hebt u dit al gedaan maar het overzicht dat op het monument in Assen staat zou m.i. een goede lijst aan verwanten kunnen opleveren die u aan de Jewishgen discussiegroepen kunt aanbieden.
Vriendelijke groet,
Ron Peeters(NL)


Re: Rabbis in Belarus #belarus

alan moskowitz
 

Irene,
 
I would appreciate if you could look up my great great grandfather in your book "  LATTER DAY LEADERS SAGES AND SCHOLARS" as noted in JewishGen.  The family lore is that he was a Rabbi in the Russian Empire but I have no evidence of that.  His name was Itzchak Vaskovych, with his given name sometimes listed as Itska.   The town he was from might possibly be Dukora (now in Belarus), but he might be found in the Minsk vicinity.  He was born around 1845 is all I know and possibly visited the USA in 1900 and/ or in the early 1900's.  Also, he possibly could have changed his surname to Waskovitch or Moskovich.  
 
Thanks very much.  By the way your private email was not working. 
 
Alan Moskowitz
New Jersey


Re: Kiev Tzesarskaya #ukraine

Janet Furba
 

Hi ask the Ukraine State archive in Kiev and the Kiev town archive.
Janet Furba,
Germany


Re: Using the Jewish Encyclopedia as a Source for Further Info #rabbinic #hungary

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Worldcat.org says it is Frumkin by Eben Shemuel, in Hebrew.  It is available in Zurich.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Re: What’s in a name #names

Judith Singer
 

Hello - 1. Bunim is a recognized name and in fact at least one illustrious rabbi was named Bunim. I don't think there is any closure on the question of whether it was a contracted nickname for Benjamin or an adopted name from the French "bon homme", good man. It often appears as the kinnui (associated given name to a particular Hebrew name) for Simcha. 

2. A patronymic name is one based on a father's first name, e.g. Zalmanson in your example. Depending on when your Levi Titchak lived, Zalman might have been his father's name, if Zalmanson was adopted directly in response to a law requiring Jews to acquire surnames (in 1804 in Russia, for example, though it took decades for many Russian Jews to conform to that law). Again, depending on when he lived, Zalman might have been a grandfather's or great-grandfather's first name.  
3. As far as I know, it was not standard practice in any location for sons to take on the surnames of the father and mothers to take the surnames of the mother. If you are working from Polish records, last names can be particularly confusing because in many cases clerks recorded the birth using the mother's name, I believe because the marriage had been only a religious ceremony and not also a civil one, but it's not consistent. Sometimes if you're lucky, a clerk will record both parents' surnames and that can help you figure out relationships.
good luck - Judith Singer


Re: Kiev Tzesarskaya #ukraine

Mike Coleman
 

Hi Samuel,

This recent thread on this site may help regarding Michael :

https://groups.jewishgen.org/g/main/topic/81120240

So far I've used only the obd-memorial.ru database but it provided amazing, and very helpful, information.

Good luck.

Mike Coleman    London (U.K.)

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