Date   

Re: Dorot Center #names

Laurie Sosna
 

I bookmarked it, it's not available from the main museum site.
https://dbs.anumuseum.org.il/skn/en/c6/BH
Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Click on Jewish Genealogy to search for names.
It's got a big search field at the top, not much in the way of refining the search.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA


Re: Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names

mvayser@...
 

Manya is a nickname for Maria in Russian and Ukrainian and possibly some other Slavic languages.  It's likely that the full name was Mariem, Maria, or similar.

Mike Vayser


Dorot Center #names

Marilyn Levinson
 

Il am wondering if anyone has recently used the DOROT (The Douglas E. Goldman Jewish Genealogy Center at Beth Hatefutsoth) recently to research family names.  I came across the name from an old brochure found in a family researcher's belongings.  When I went to the web site I could not search the database.  Is this still a usable site to research family names?  Thank you for your help.
Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Re: Viewmate translation Russian - surname for bride, no surname for groom? #lithuania #records

mvayser@...
 

It's quite likely, based on your additional record and lack of Efroimovich last names in the area, that this is the same family and the last name was just missed in the 1854 marriage record.  It's not out of the realm of possibility, that this couple had a child born 20 years after they were married.

Mike Vayser


Re: Was it common for relatives to move far away from their families? #lithuania #ukraine

paulkozo@...
 

Chloe asks a good question,   Around 1900 both scenarios would have been common: some stayed put, some moved.

There are many reasons why our very mobile ancestors moved within the Russian Empire.  These include (and this is not an exhaustive list):

1.        Marriage:   Shtetl level data for Salakas marriages  - about 38 km down the road from Utena - for the period 1886 to 1910 shows that while most men married locally in the district or nearby districts, some married far more distantly.  Recall there were customary reasons why often men moved to their wives' home towns. A summary of the data is at http://zarasai.blogspot.com/2009/08/more-on-marriage.html.  

2.       Conscription:  Veterans often retired far away from their home towns.

3.       Business success:  First and second class merchants could live in the major cities:  so one can perhaps find relatives born in St Petersburg and Moscow.

4.       Opportunity:  within the Russian Empire there were projects such as Shchedrin for farming which attracted Jewish settlers from some distance.

5,        Education:  whether secular or religious.   At various times it was possible to get a University education.

Most of my Utianer relatives had emigrated by 1900 :  South Africa, the US and UK were the typical destinations.  There was an Utianer society in Johannesburg.   It may be easier to find related Fishers abroad rather than elsewhere in Russia.   

In any case, Chloe may want to first consider the odds of evidencing any link to Utian Fishers with any random Fisher she finds in Russia or elsewhere.  A unified search for Fishers across the Jewishgen databases has more than 87,000 hits - while Fisher + Utena is only 78.  "Fisher" may be too common to make fishing for them in the wider sea a profitable exercise.   

The problem with searching for "Fisher" + Utena on most other databases is that the town name used in the record may not have been regularised for indexing, may look quite different and may therefore not be easily picked up -  I have found documents that have Ootsyany, Utsiany, Utian, Utyan, and more  - and random transcription makes this even more problematic. 

An approach that combines documents and DNA might be most effective, if there are enough known Fisher cousins to test today to create a good benchmark for the DNA side.     

--
Paul Hattori
London UK

SHADUR, SADUR, SHADER, SADER, CHADOUR, SADOUR, SHADOUR,  SZADUR from Salakas, Lithuania
MINDEL, MINDELL from Utena and Vyzuonos, Lithuania
FELLER from Pabrade, Lithuania


Re: Was it common for relatives to move far away from their families? #lithuania #ukraine

Dan Nussbaum
 

My father in law's family was from Zinkov, Ukraine, but his uncle wound up in Riga, Latvia.

When my mother and her nuclear family left Ukraine for New York, they visited relatives in Europe all along the way.

So I would say moving distances was quite common.

Daniel Nussbaum II, M.D., FAAP
Retired Developmental Pediatrician
Rochester, New York
yekkey@...
 
Tone can be misinterpreted in email. Please read my words with warmth, kindness, and good intentions.

Searching for;
Nussbaum, Katzenstein, Mannheimer and Goldschmidt; Rhina, Raboldshausen and Bad Hersfeld, Germany
Teplitzky, Bendersky and Kaszkiet; Uman, Ukraine
Rosenthal and S(c)henk(el)man; Zinkov, Ukraine
Bild and Kashlevsky; anywhere


Re: Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names

Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
 

The female name that is phonetically "Manya" is the first name of my husband's paternal grandmother, who lived in Galicia.

We, too, do not know what the origin of the name is and have wondered about it, since we thought it did not seem to resonate as a Jewish name.

Autosomal DNA testing does confirm, however, that three of her grandchildren, who are children of two of her male children, are categorized by the DNA vendors as Ashkenazi Jews at a very high percentage.

Ellen Zyroff


On Friday, April 9, 2021, 12:36:42 PM PDT, Gary via groups.jewishgen.org <electromd=verizon.net@...> wrote:


I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY

--
ZOLOTOROV (Chernigov, Ukraine; Kiev, Ukraine);
SLOTOROFF (Kiev, Ukraine)
CHARKOVSKY or SHARKOVSKY(Ukraine);
LEVINE (Ukraine and Minsk, Belarus);
GLUSKIN (Ukraine)
LIMON (Berestechko, Volynia, Ukraine)
TESLER (Horochiv, Volynia, Ukraine)
ZYRO (Zabolativ, Ukraine) 
TAU (Zalolativ, Ukraine)
PISTERMAN (Ukraine)
ROTH / ROT (Ataki, Bessarabia, Moldova)
BLAUSTEIN (Chernigov, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus)


Re: Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names

Gary
 

I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY


Re: Looking for Family of Rut Sokol - Brooklyn NY #usa

Sherri Bobish
 

Steve,

Ruth Sokol has a testimony at USC Shoah Foundation, Visual History Archive.
https://vhaonline.usc.edu/viewingPage?testimonyID=25737
Index of names in Ruth's testimony:
Name: Ruth Sokol
[Ruth Eckstein] 
Maiden Name: Eckstein
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 6 Jan 1929
Birth Place: Berlin, Germany
Interview Date: 17 Dec 1996
Interview Place: Brooklyn, New York, USA
Relationship: Self (Head)
Role: Interviewee
Household:
Name Relationship
Daniel Eckstein Father
Sarah Ita Eckstein Mother
Moritz Eckstein Brother
Morris Sokol Husband
Yoel Taubenblatt Uncle (Maternal) (Uncle)
Esther Arnovitz Aunt (Maternal) (Aunt)
David Eckstein Uncle (Paternal) (Uncle)
Miriam Szajewicz Aunt (Paternal) (Aunt)
Makhla Taubenblatt Grandmother
Abraham Taubenblatt Extended Family Members
Rifka Taubenblatt Extended Family Members
Reuben Taubenblatt Extended Family Members
Chaya Taubenblatt Extended Family Members
Esther Papiernik Aunt
Abram Papiernik Cousin
David Papiernik Cousin
Shmul Papiernik Cousin
Rifcha Papiernik Cousin
Binem Szajewicz Uncle
Blimaleh Szajewicz Cousin (Paternal) (Cousin)
Yisrael Arnovitz Uncle
Cilla Eckstein Aunt (Paternal) (Aunt)
Ruth Sokol Self (Head)
There are photographs with her testimony.

Good luck in your search,


Sherri Bobish


Re: New York City Death Record Questions #general #records #usa

Sherri Bobish
 

Jeff,

If it's any help, here is a photo of Julius' tombstone:
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98725610/julius-fine
And, Samuel's:
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98725641/samuel-fine

This may be the family living in NYC on Henry Street on the 1900 census. You can see the actual census page at:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6SS9-LYV?i=22&cc=1325221&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AMSJL-YZV
Household
Role
Sex
Age
Birthplace
Head
Male
38
Russia
Wife
Female
36
Russia
Julius Fine
Son
Male
16
Russia
Daughter
Female
14
New York
Daughter
Female
11
New York
Son
Male
8
New York
Daughter
Female
6
New York
Son
Male
2
New York
Servant
Female
19
Russia
And, 1910 census living on West 115th Street:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RJX-WQH?i=11&cc=1727033&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AM53N-93D
Household
Role
Sex
Age
Birthplace
Harris Fine
Head
Male
47
Russia
Wife
Female
46
Russia
Son
Male
25
Russia
Daughter
Female
21
New York
Daughter
Female
18
New York
Son
Male
17
New York
Daughter
Female
14
New York
Son
Male
12
New York
Son
Male
7
New York
Father-in-law
Male
87
Russia
Servant
Female
47
Russia
Servant
Female
26
Austria

If you search each of their names at www.familysearch.org you will find much more information.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Looking for BOROK in Ukraine #bessarabia #ukraine #israel

donna@...
 

I am searching for my relatives with the last name BOROK. My grandfather (Kissel Borok) and his siblings were from Akkerman in Bessarabia, but I know records don't exist for this. His brother, Lova Borok, survived WW2 and remained in Odessa. Lova's son, Robert Borok, was a decorated Russian soldier, who eventually went to Israel, and died in Jerusalem in 2010. I believe he had 2 sons there (but I do not know their given names. My question is how to find out more about this branch of my family? I have located other siblings of my grandfather in Yad Vashem, but Lova eludes me....much appreciation for your help.

Donna Borok Moss
donna@...
San Rafael, California


The Provenance of Hebrew Typeface #yiddish #general

Laurie Sosna
 

A very interesting article about the history of and the search for the creators of Hebrew typeface.
https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/hebrew-type-printing

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA


Re: Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names

hfark29@...
 

Muni in our family was a nickname for Shimon.....(in Israel.)
Heidi Farkash 


Re: Help with multipage document for ViewMate #translation #germany #hungary

Andreas Schwab
 

To give you a summary, this is a marriage contract between the bride Amalie (Amalia) Steiner, assisted by her guardian (her mother), widow Therese Steiner, and the groom, Samuel Schwarz. At the end there is a list of the trousseau, down to the number of handkerchiefs. Everything is in German except the preamble and a paragraph at the end of the contract, which are in Hungarian.
--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


Contact JRI-Poland before you take any steps to obtain Polish Citizenship. #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends:
 
Recent posts about obtaining a Polish passport, lead me to share a few thoughts:
 
1.  Why pay for search archival sources when JRI-Poland may have the needed record
     information in our offline data from more than 200 towns?  These are typically birth, 
     marriage and/or books of residents with the records of parents and grandparents 
     to be used for your applications.
 
2.  Some professional companies and individuals are known to charge you for research 
     rather going the easy root and contacting JRI-Poland on your behalf.   We have heard 
     many stories of duplication of research for records previously indexed by JRI-Poland, 
     obviously a waste of money.
 
3.  We have been thanked by claimants in many countries for providing them with the
     information they needed to obtain certified copies of the documents for their application.  
     Many have subsequently made donations to JRI-Poland that are minimal compared 
     to the cost of on site research in Polish repositories. And for the sake of full disclosure, 
     a few have made very generous donations for our help in literally "pulling a rabbit out 
     of the hat" by providing a document from a totally unexpected source.
 
4.  Not all companies/individuals in the business of helping you obtain a Polish passport 
     are created equal.  Do your homework and check them out.
 
Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.  (Montreal, 514-484-0100)
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
 
 
 


Re: Assistance Needed to translate the Hebrew on Family Gravestones #translation

Susan&David
 

They can be found on FindaGrave.com

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 4/9/2021 11:32 AM, fredelfruhman wrote:
These photos seem to be very low-resolution.  They become pixelated when I zoom in on them.

Do you have higher-resolution versions?

Also:  why not post them on ViewMate, under "translation-tombstone".
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


Re: Why Did Jews Marry Christians? #general

Jules Levin
 

Regarding the Conversos, according to Professor Netanyahu, a historian
of the Inquisition, approximately half the Conversos were sincere
converts to Christianity.  By the way, as I recall, Lenin's grandfather,
surname Blank, was considered a Jew, altho of course a convert.  He was
an estate owner--a member of the gentry class.

Jules Levin

Los Angeles


On 4/8/2021 6:59 AM, Lin Mor wrote:
Even though my maternal grandfather's brother converted to Russian
Orthodox for "business reasons" in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, his
descendants identify as Jewish. Consider the possibility that the
conversion served as the "public religion." Think about the Conversos
of Spain and Portugal, I think perhaps there are some similarities
here, but with nowhere as dire consequences.

Linda Cohen Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

Researching:

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelets
and Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany and France

KOSOFSKY in Shchuchyn, near Lida, Belarus

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Re: Why Did Jews Marry Christians? #general

Francis AMAR
 

Could you envisage as an "extreme way" that jews married christians because they were in love ? :-)))
Kind regards,
Francis Amar


Re: The Steinfeld family from Libau (Liepaja) in Latvia. Research #scandinavia #latvia #general

Sherri Bobish
 

Dag,

Have you searched The JewishGen Latvia database?
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Latvia/

A very quick search finds the STEINFELD family you mentioned in Grobin, and also in Grobin names spelled SHTEINFELD born 1893 to 1901.

I suggest doing a phonetic or soundex (sounds like) search at the above database to see these records.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Assistance Needed to translate the Hebrew on Family Gravestones #translation

Aimee Smythe
 

Fredel,
Thank you for the suggestion. I didn't know about ViewMate as I have just joined Jewishgen. I will check into how to post them on ViewMate. I took these photos from findagrave.com so I do not have access to higher resolution photos. Do you have any ideas how I might obtain higher resolution photos? 
Thank you,
Aimee Smythe

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