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Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Peter Straus
 

There’s clearly nothing that can effectively be done about this problem, and it’s not likely to get better.  The one response I know is to train users to be very cautious about accepting any information as true that does not include appropriate source documentation.  Let me add that references to other trees does not in and of itself constitute documentation given the amount of misinformation propagated from one to multiple trees; I’m sure we all have stories about that phenomenon.

--peter straus  

  San Francisco


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

jbonline1111@...
 

I don't have a public tree at any of the mentioned sites, though I have considered it.  The comments here have convinced me to keep my tree private other than on JewishGen.  Luckily for me, my cousin's husband works on our shared tree and even parts of the tree not shared from time to time and shares info with me.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Immigration via Hoboken? #usa

Laurie Budgar
 

I just received my great-granduncle's naturalization records. They indicate he immigrated through the port of Hoboken on 12 Sep 1898 on the ship Frederick der Grosse. I've never heard of immigrating through this port, but apparently it did happen in this time frame. Still, I'm stumped as to where to find his passenger manifest. I've looked on Ancestry and Family Search as well as the NARA website, but have not found any records for this port. Does anyone know where I might access them? Thanks in advance!

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Martyn Woolf
 

Alan Ehrlich is absolutely right about GENI. It is wrong to describe it as a genealogical site because its information is so often wrong. It is a very good site to discover “Mishpochah”.  If I want to know my second cousin’s ex-wife’s grand-ma, I would use GENI. For anything serious, I would not.

 

Martyn Woolf

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

With regard to fixing mistakes on Geni, if the profile managers do not respond, go to the Discussions page at https://www.geni.com/discussions and the first one listed should be "ATTENTION Curators, please assist.” Try asking for help there. You can also write directly to me or one of the other volunteer Jewish genealogy curators. See https://www.geni.com/projects/Jewish-Genealogy-Curators/13122

The goal of Geni is to have one, single tree for everyone, as accurate as possible. So everyone wants to get those mistakes fixed. If you cannot do it yourself, just ask for help.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Emigration from Russian Empire to Canada #courland #lithuania #belarus #ukraine #russia

itencorinne@...
 

Hi

Maybe you know this sources already, but maybe they are interesting for others too.

Passengers Manifests / Border Crossings are online on Library and Archives Canada and/or familysearch.
Canadian Censuslists are online on Library and Archives Canada until 1921 and 1926 (Prairie Provinces).
Birth/Marriage/Death Records for Ontario are online on familysearch.

Regards
Corinne Iten
Switzerland


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Deb Katz
 

I share the frustrations expressed but here is my perspective.  My tree at GENI allows me to get notices about new possible connections and comments upon existing ones...I don't "use" it as my main reference tree and thus I am not horrified if someone alters it. (In a few instances, I just altered it back!)  The tree I rely on personally for myself is Ancestry (where I periodically download it to my hard-drive as a back-up) and that one can't be messed with by anyone else.  As for folks who erroneously copy from it and attach sections to their trees, I write them a short note at ancestry (click on their name when you come across their tree) explaining why the connection is impossible.  If they ignore me...it's really their loss---I don't worry about serious genealogists (people with significant trees) glossing over my tree because it differs with another. In the end, I get more benefit from trees on Geni and Ancestry etc. than the "privacy/security" of not having them is worth.

Finally, when viewing the trees of others and deciding about "absorbing" later generations they have that I don't, in addition to records etc.---including looking people up in the Jewish Encyclopedia or in Jewishgen databases etc.--- I use common sense.  If the names and flow seem logical but dates are off, I will adjust dates (ca)...if dates are ok but names/flow seem off, I just don't add them to my tree or I include (SPECULATIVE) as part of the surname....this is particularly true when a somewhat famous person (rabbi for instance) has a zillion children...obviously folks are just adding an ancestor as a child so they can be descended from that rabbi! Oy veh.  Usually an internet search on the rabbi's name and dates gives enough clues as to which children and locations are believable and which are not.  And what I'm usually interested in just the one or two children that clearly connect to my lines so there's no need to add the siblings until and unless they become relevant.
--
Deb
aka Debra Katz
Pacific Beach CA USA
dnadeb@...


Re: The woman's name of ZETA #names

Victor Weisskopf
 

I grew up in University City, MO, USA, a suburb of St Louis with a large Jewish population. One of my classmates in the l950s was a girl named Zeta Zlepper. Yes.
In those days, pupils were arranged alphabetically in the classrooms, so the W's and Z's would be close by. She's a lovely person, married now many years, with a last name closer to the front of the alphabet.  
--
Vic Weisskopf
Deerfield, IL USA
Weisskopf, Kober, Marx, Lazarus
lionel681@...


Re: Emigration from Russian Empire to Canada #courland #lithuania #belarus #ukraine #russia

Geoff Chester
 

Hi Molly,
I've checked out Pier 21's records, and they've been very enlightening! 
Thanks so much for the recommendation.
Best regards,
Geoff Chester
Liepaja, Latvia


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

There is so much misinformation about Geni from people who don’t really use it.  The critic Alan Ehrlich, for example, has added just 34 profiles on Geni.  Geni is as good as we all make it.  For those of us who build our trees there, it has been a tremendously valuable experience.  Collaboration is the key to making real advances in genealogy, and at the moment, Geni is the best tool we have.
 
My blog from 2016 describes many of the advantages of Geni.
 
And this blog from 2014 answers pretty much all of the unwarranted criticism. 
 
I’ll make one request.  If you don’t use Geni, that’s fine.  But just please stop talking about it and telling people not to use it. 
 
Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: marriage record for Heinrich GOLDNER from Militärseelsorge, Vienna, Austria #austria-czech #general

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I added the marriage record to his Geni profile.  https://www.geni.com/people/Heinrich-Goldner/6000000014548406203
 
Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA
 
 


I am sharing my DNA success story #dna

Moishe Miller
 

Good morning from Brooklyn,

I am sharing my DNA success story from this weekend, notwithstanding both endogamy and pedigree collapse in my family ancestry. I tested family members a few years ago on FTDNA and also uploaded their results to MyHeritage. Last month, I re-tested my maternal aunt, but with Ancestry. The results came back this past Friday. One of her highest matches was to someone with a surname of SWIMM and the match was 3% shared DNA | 232 cM across 14 segments, Unweighted shared DNA: 232 cM, Longest segment: 34 cM. There was a tree with only 3 people, but SWIMM's father was SWIMMER. I had Schwimmer's in my tree and wondered if this was a match. Using Blaine T. Bettinger's quick-n-dirty tree methodology, I was able to bring this family back two more generations, and tentatively back to Munkacz (a town now in the Ukraine) to connect this tree to my g-gm (using the unindexed Hebrew name on a tombstone in Pennsylvania). My g-gm's parents were both married before; both had spouses that passed away after starting a family. I have found birth records for many of her half-siblings, but was never successful in finding a paper trail to trace any of them forward. Now, with this DNA test, I found a family that immigrated to the USA in 1895. I never found them because of the changed surname. Looking up the match on the Shared cM Tool, it indicates a 33% chance for Half 2c, which is what I believe my aunt is with this match. And then serendipitously, a day later, I had activity show on my tree at FamilySearch, with someone linked to another of my g-gm's half-siblings; a full sibling to this SWIMM. This was through a much larger match to my maternal great-aunt, and this one was via MyHeritage, with a family now residing in Hungary. This match had Shared DNA of 280 cM, 10 Shared segments, Largest segment 51.5‎ cM. I believe the match to be a half 1c2r. The Shared cM Tool shows 17% for this, but notes: † this relationship has a positive probability for 280cM in thednageek's table of probabilities, but falls outside the bounds of the recorded cM range (99th percentile). My paper trail is not yet conclusive enough, but if they test on Ancestry, while I do more paper genealogy in Hungary and Ukraine, I hope to prove all three families link the way it seems to me. I hope my experience encourages others.
Stay safe.
--

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@...
JGFF #3391


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Naomi Finkelstein
 

I have had someone do the same thing. He has my great-great grandfather from the paternal Finkelstein side of my family in his tree as well as my great-grandparents, all of their children and the documentation I had attached to all. Clearly those two generations are all deceased. He stopped there although my father's generation is also all deceased, thankfully, he did not add them nor, the succeeding generations.

I have messaged him three times requesting proof of the relationships and he has not responded though I know he has read my message. I even sent emails to some people in his tree but they have not responded. 

Not as many as some but I have spent over 10 years working on my trees and I really resent someone doing this. This also  happened with someone else's tree and when I contacted him he said it was too bad I hadn't made my tree private. He also didn't have any paper trail. Needless to say, both of these people have over 10,000 people in their trees. Somehow, for people who take their trees seriously, this is not an appropriate method of building trees.
Naomi Finkelstein
Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Sarah L Meyer
 

Jessica,
  First this is a common problem with Ancestry or MyHeritage, if you have a public tree.  Secondly, unless your family was ultra-wealthy or famous, any genealogical information that is out there is NOT the cause of identity theft.  Someone would have had to target your family and researched them to get this data to use for identity theft.  Identity theft is based on big breaches of information from hacking online records.  Those records contain Current Addresses, phone numbers, names, credit card numbers and social security numbers.  It is much easier to buy this information from the dark web at pennies per person than to spend hours chasing down the descendants and ancestors of your family or mine.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Use of the term "Color" in late 19th century and Early 20th century NYC Birth Records #records

sbloom@...
 

I have noticed the term "Color" used in Late 19th century and Early 20th Century birth records of New York City. Since I have only seen two such records up close for my relatives, I can't make general conclusions. For one of my cousins, George Schaffran, it gives "Color" as "White ." For another relative, William Bloom/Blum, who by dna tests I know was of Eastern European Jewish extraction, it says he was "Colored."  

In such records, is this term referring to what we commonly think of as "race" today?  If so, is "Colored" categorizing a person into what we would commonly think of as a "Person of Color" today, such as Black/African American. Afro-European, etc., Asian, Hispanic and others, or is the term meant to be more general?  Some of my relatives now are saying that since many people didn't consider Jews of that time  to be really White, they would have no problem calling them "Colored" on a birth record. I have my doubts about that.

I'd appreciate opinions on this, no to much on that last matter, but on whether NYC records of that time tended to call Jews "White", "Colored" or something else. 

Thank you for your insights,

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia, USA


Re: Wrong people on family trees on genealogy sites #general

Stephen Katz
 

Yes, this is a problem. Early in my genealogy journey, I posted my family tree on geni.com. That turned out to be a big mistake. It was latched onto (hijacked) by other people who added individuals to whom I am very clearly not related. The numbers of wrong additions to my tree has grown and grown. When I contacted to Geni I was informed that, since other people had latched onto my tree, I could not remove the wrong entries. There was also no way I could delete my tree. My only option would have been to cancel my Geni account, which, however, would not have removed my tree.

Stephen Katz 


Baden Germany 1687-1730 R. Seligmann of Hüffenhardt Mohel Book Transcription #germany

Alex Calzareth
 

Those with ancestors from the Kraichgau region of Baden may be interested in a Mohel book that I recently came across on the website of the National Library of Israel at https://merhav.nli.org.il/permalink/f/ldj0th/NNL_ALEPH11340766590005171or also try https://www.nli.org.il/en/manuscripts/NNL_ALEPH997008553870105171/NLI#$FL135781875
 
This is not the original Mohel book, but instead is a German transcription prepared in the mid-1930s, by Sigmund Jeselsohn of Neckarbischofsheim. The original book recorded the circumcisions performed by Rabbi Seligmann from Hüffenhardt during the years 1687 to 1730.  An article from Jeseloshn wrote about the book in "Der Israelit" is reproduced at http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/hueffenhardt_synagoge.htm
 
There are about 1,200 entries in the book. The towns with the most entries are  Neckarbischofsheim - 68 entries, Odenheim - 42 entries, Neidenstein - 33, Heinsheim - 38, Ittlingen - 34, Eichtersheim - 34, Flehingen - 33, Weiler - 33,Steinsberg - 33, Stein am Kocher - 29, Mosbach - 31, Wimpfen am Neckar - 28, Rappenau -27, Michelfeld - 27, and Hirschhorn am Neckar - 24 .
 
I have started to extract some of the towns and you can see those entries on a spreadsheet at http://tinyurl.com/mohelbookindexsh . This is sorted by town and then by father's name. Although the Mohel was active in a particular town that does not mean that he was the only Mohel who families there would have used.
 
The second part of the book is a similar transcription of 636 entries from the Mohel book of Aron Kaufmann Baer of Neckarbischofsheim (and later Frankfurt) for 1836 to 1875.

Alex Calzareth
JewishGen Director of Research for Germany
alcalz@...
New York, NY
 


Re: marriage record for Heinrich GOLDNER from Militärseelsorge, Vienna, Austria #austria-czech #general

Stephen Katz
 

The Militärseelsorge is the military chaplain. It would appear from Andreas Schwab's post that they were married by a Jewish military chaplain.

Stephen Katz

Researching: KATZ (Novograd-Volinskiy, Ukraine); TEPPER (Rovno, Ukraine); KAPLAN (Stakliskes, Lithuania); VITKIN (Kaunas, Lihuania) 


Re: NYC Police Reports #records

manderlie@...
 

You may want to try the cemetery and funeral home. Jewish ones don't always keep more records but the non Jewish cemeteries and funeral homes usually do have information. I am guessing you hare checked death notices.  Why not try to locate their home address and if it is important to you it is possible a neighbour may still be there who would give you a clue.  

Sue Diamond, Canada


ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

Corey Brand
 

Hi,

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. I would like to know the bride and groom’s ages and the names of their parents. It is on ViewMate at the following address ... https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM93331

Thank you very much,
Corey Brand
South Florida, USA
Researching:
MARKOWSKI in Kalisz & Kolo (MARKEL in NYC)
WALTER in Kalisz, Kolo, & Konin
NELKEN in Kalisz
SZTAJER in Kalisz & Stawiszyn 
BRENER in Kalisz
ENGELMAN in Wieruszow & Kalisz

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