Date   

Survivors of Maisi Klein #subcarpathia Friedman family #subcarpathia

Stuart Kaufer
 

Searching for surviving members of Maisi Klein, last known address in 1967:   155/40 Zolotov Askolon, Israel.   He was the brother of Perl Katz who was a cousin through my great uncle David Friedman.  Perl lived in Munkacs w her husband Herman and sons.  Emigrated in early 70's to Israel. 

Stuart Kaufer
Friedman, Kaufer, Lebovits, Steinlauff
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information


Archival Information: 1913 Poltava Province #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

Hi All,
For those of you with an interest in Ukraine, on my blog, JewishGem's Genealogy, I have added a posting related to Poltava Province 1913 Recruitment & Residency. This is archival information which included a variety of complaints against governmental actions related to the draft of loved ones. Included are many names, addresses, & other information that you may find interesting.
As one example, a grandmother complained that Kremenchug failed to grant benefits to her grandson. Her name as well as that of her grandson, & foster child were mentioned inthe complaint; also her address. 
Information can be found on my blog at: 
https://yourjewishgem.blogspot.com/2021/04/poltava-province-state-archive-of.html
Marilyn ROBINSON (aka JewishGem)
Florida
Searching: YUDIN (Sharkovshchina, Belarus), UNTERBERGER (Krakow, Tarnow)

 


Re: Immigration via Hoboken? #usa

Laurie Budgar
 

Thanks to everyone who responded. It makes a lot more sense knowing the ship would have gone through Ellis Island. Unfortunately, as Janette points out, the ship did not dock in NY at any time in the month of September 1898. The information my ancestor (Abraham Winokur) provided is obviously unreliable, as Joel noted would be likely. I did browse through the manifest for the ship's Aug 23 1898 landing, page by page, and did not find his name. I cannot find it on any indexed list, either (including the one David suggested). It may be a very tedious process of browsing through all the ship's landings from that year and 1899. (Why only those two years? His son Hyman was allegedly born in Russia in August 1898, and I know Abraham is in the US by 1900 (appears on the census and reports year of immigration as 1898). I doubt he would have traveled first or second class, though. 

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA


Re: Kitchener Camps Sandwich #unitedkingdom

Emily Rosenberg
 

This article from The Guardian can lead you to more information. 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/24/kitchener-camp-sandwich-kent-german-jews-haven


--
Emily Rosenberg
Oakland, California

KESNER in Amsterdam, London, Chicago
STODEL in Amsterdam, London, USA
KAWIN in Suwalki and Poland
RUBINSKY in Suwalki and Poland


Re: Tiktin #general

sfalkjd@...
 

Yes.   Based on the marriage entry for Recha (Rosel) LANDAU and R. Salomon TIKTIN, indexed by the good works of the Czestochowa-Radom Area Research Group (CRAGR), Recha's parents were Wolff LANDAU and Estera HERSZLIKOW.  (And Estera seems to be the same person as Ester LANDAU geb. ZYNGIEROW who died on 19 January 1823 (age: 61), widow of Wolf LANDAU (and her father was presumably Hersz ZYNGIER).)

Wolff seems to have had a brother name Moysesz (Mosche) LANDAU, but I have not been able to identify his (their) father.

Wolff was born ca.1749, based on his stated age (62) at his death on 24 November 1811 (but the ages of people was notoriously inaccurate before modern times).   (Again, thanks to CRAGR database,)

I have not managed to learn where Wolff LANDAU fits into the LANDAU firmament.

All the best,
Stephen Falk
Point Roberts, WA, USA


ISO descendants of SINGER/ZINGER brothers Hirschel (Girsh), Simon (Shimel), Peisakh & Leizer Singer of Pusalotas & Najamiestis Panevezys, Lithuania #lithuania

matt.f.singer23@...
 

Are you descended from a SINGER/ZINGER family in the towns of Pusalotas and/or Naujamiestis Panevezys, Lithuania? If so, we are almost certainly related. In the 1970s Rosanne and Dan Leeson were very far ahead of the curve in creating a computer database of the descendants of Hirschel/Girsh and Simon/Shimel Singer, brothers who came to the U.S. in the 1880s from Lithuania. At that time, the database included info for more than 3,000 individuals.

WHY I'M WRITING NOW: yesterday I found a record--for on Ancestry, then on JewishGen--that greatly expands my knowledge of the family after four decades of research. This record is from a REvision List from Pusalotas, Lithuania, dated April 26, 1834. This new (for me, perhaps for you) information includes:
Birth year for Hirschel/Girsh: 1802
Birth year for Simon/Shimel (my gg-grandfather): 1808
Hirschel and Simon had two brothers: Peisakh (born 1805) and Leizer (1812)
The parents of these four brothers: Leib (born 1755 in Kaunas) and Ester (born 1784)--my ggg-grandparents
The grandfather of these four brothers (my gggg-grandfather): Girsh (also)

This is quite a treasure-trove of new discovery for me--again, perhaps it is for you, too. If these are your ancestors, as well, I'd be delighted to connect. I am not sure of what became of the family-tree database created by the Leesons--I hold hope that someone has been updating it over the 45 years since it was created. 

Yours in extended family,
Matt Singer
Philadelphia PA
Singer-related families in my line: GARONZIK, FREEDMAN, GERBER

PS: I searched JewishGen for others researching Singers from Pusalotas but found no matches.


Looking for descendents of the brothers Samuel and Israel Altman of Woodbine, NJ #names #usa

diamondesllc@...
 



I have a very strong (2nd or 3rd cousin) DNA match with Alfred Altman, grandson of Samuel Altman and grandnephew of Israel Altman.   In the 1890s, the brothers Samuel and Israel Altman emigrated to Woodbine, NJ, also home of my grandparents - Solomon and Ida (Potashnick) Dimenstein.  I am looking for the relationship between the Altmans and the Dimensteins/Potashnicks. 

Stephen Diamond


Re: Requesting translations from German #germany #translation

Andreas Schwab
 

The letter (4 Jul 1936 - 2.pdf) is in reality dated 7 July 1936. The day may look like a 4, but is more similar to the 7 of the month (compare with the 4 in the other letter). It is in Dutch, except for the last paragraph which is in German. It is addressed to "my dear husband" (in Dutch) and is signed by "your wife" (in German). In the Dutch part there is a "Liesje" mentioned, who becomes "Lieschen" in the German part.
The second letter (4 Jul 1936.pdf) starts in German and continues in Dutch about halfway down the page. It ends without a signature. But in the middle of the Dutch part, there is the German phrase "Leb wohl, Geliebter". 
The undated two pages are in German, but the interesting thing is that at the end, there is a timetable of the return trip of the writer (the mother) by train from Chur to Amsterdam.
Here is my interpretation of the situation: It appears that the mother was staying in St. Moritz in a hotel and visted Lischen/Liesje, presumably her daughter, whereas the  father stayed in Amsterdam where he worked at the stock exchange. The daughterl had been very sick before and now stays in St.Moritz at a sanatorium. The family seems to be normally living in Amsterdam and to be bilingual. Lieschen is also bilingual because the writer sometimes speaks Dutch with her.
If you have the originals, it would be wise to scan them again with less contrast because some of the strokes disappear which makes is hard and someltimes impossisble to read.

--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


trying to contact Israel tepper #usa

Milton Koch
 

I am trying to contact Israel Tepper, from USA-regarding KOCH family from Czernowitz.
Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD


Headstone Photograph Needed (Massachusetts) #photographs #usa

Janis and Joe Datz
 

I would like a photograph of the headstone for Dora Pearlmutter who died February 17, 1948 in Quincy, Massachusetts.  She is buried in Rabbi Isaac Elchonon Cemetery, 232 Fuller Street, Everett, Massachusetts. 
Section 48, Grave 2.

Dora's husband was Abraham Pearlmutter.  He died in Boston, Massachusetts on May 19, 1926.  I am not certain Dora and Abraham are buried together.  The cemetery keeper said he have lost records from 1926.

I have posted my request on findagrave with no success.  I have not yet pursued obtaining Abraham's death certificate but if he and his wife are buried next to each other, I would appreciate a photograph of his headstone.

I would be grateful for your assistance.  Many thanks.

Janis Friedenberg Datz
jjdatz@...


Re: Requesting translations from German #germany #translation

r.peeters
 

Dear Edith,

I will have a go at the translation. The explanation of the language matter is: it was sent to her husband who obviously was Dutch. The first line reads 'Dearest Husband' (Man in Dutch).
Ron Peeters (NL)


Re: Viewmate request - meaning of annotation on manifest in name column - not the Certificate of arrival annotation - ROCHKES, KRAWCZYK #records

Marian
 

Hi Bobbi,

Maybe I can put this another way:

Everything USCIS has on this immigrant SHOULD be in the Certificate File (C-file).  So you request that by C-file number, which is the certificate number.  That number usually appears in the upper right of a 1940's naturalization index card.  I see Isidore KRAFTCHICK's C-number is C-6609278 (you have to add the "C" to the front of the number.

Unfortunately, as I noted simply as a warning, sometimes one finds the INS clerks back then did not always follow all the rules for files consolidation. They SHOULD have 1) opened an A-file in 1944 to hold all his existing naturalization application paperwork, 2) pulled the prior Registry File and filed it inside the A-file, and finally 3) upon his naturalization in 1945, converted the A-file (including the Registry File) into a C-file, and sent the C-file to storage.  That's why all the files and content SHOULD be in his C-file.

Instead, occasionally we find such a C-file does not include the Registry File.  In that case one must go back and retrieve the original Registry File from the set of Registry Files in storage.  For a genealogist, that means another $65 (or $130, since one probably has to request a search first too).  

In other cases we also see they failed to even consolidate the A-file that may have been created.  This situation comes up in some cases of naturalization between 1944 and 1950.  IF an A-file exists separately, that's another $65 (because you already have the A-number, you wouldn't need to request a search).

Again, one would first request the C-file to see what is inside.  If it includes the Registry---great!  If it includes A-file material (docs and correspondence beyond the declaration, petition, certificate)--great!  At that point one would be done.  If not, the search continues.  Every case is "case by case."  I cannot tell you exactly what will happen in yours.  Chances are good you would get everything in one request for the C-file.

Good luck!

Marian Smith


Re: Kitchener Camps Sandwich #unitedkingdom

Joyaa Antares
 

Hi Richard,
Be sure to search the digest for previous posts about the Sandwich Kitchener camp as there have been a number.
Best wishes,
Joyaa ANTARES
Gold Coast, Queensland, AUSTRALIA


Re: Use of the term "Color" in late 19th century and Early 20th century NYC Birth Records #records

vicki.peisner@...
 

I noticed on my grandfather’s WWI enlistment record that on the lower left side it said to tear here if the registrant was of African Descent.  


Vicki Renert Freed Peisner
researching: Siegfried, Korshinsky, Renert, Talsky, Bernstein, Wallach, Newman, Feldstein, Gelman in Galicia, Kiev, Romania, Poland, Austria  


Re: Use of the term "Color" in late 19th century and Early 20th century NYC Birth Records #records

David Harrison
 

This is obviously a completely different practice to any that I have met in Britain, Ireland (or The Netherlands) where the Mother or Father goes to the Registrars' office within a period that has varied over time and country, to report the birth, the date and name of the child .  In some rural areas in winter, this may be months later.  it is not unknown for the Certificate to have been issued from an office in an area adjacent to that in which the child was born, because that town had shops or a market that was closer to the residence where the baby was born.
David Harrison
Birmingham, England


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Sherri Bobish <sherribob@...>
Sent: 23 April 2021 17:03
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Use of the term "Color" in late 19th century and Early 20th century NYC Birth Records #records
 
Steve,

Any time I have seen "color" as a category on a birth (and sometimes marriage) record it does refer to race.

I've seen forms that asked for description of complexion, however that is different from "color."  Complexion might be described as ruddy or fair, etc.

Many births were attended by midwifes, and many were barely literate and/or their English was limited.  It may be that the midwife did not understand the question. 

I do not know if most NYC birth certs were written out by the midwife, or by a clerk.  That would be an interesting thing to find out.

It may be that a clerk just made an error, or misunderstood what the midwife said, or the midwife simply did not understand the question.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Marriage of Fredrick George Schneeberg to Wilhelmina "Minnie" Maack on 29 April 1891, in New York #germany #usa

Robert Murowchick
 

Hi Philip,
What you see as Louth Tarbor is actually "Luth. Pastor," as the words "Official Station" refer not to a place but rather "...is taken and deemed to mean the office by virtue of which said person solemnizes such a marriage; and to describe such office in returns of marriages the words "justice of the peace," "minister of the gospel," "priest," or "rabbi," only shall be used." ("Registration of Vital Statistics" chapter, in Charles V. Chapin, Superintendent of Health of the City of Providence, 1901). Rev. Leo Koenig was the Lutheran pastor named here, and his family residence at 80 W. 12th St. in Manhattan matches that named in family obituaries. He was affiliated with the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Congregation--see attached articles.
Regards,
Bob Murowchick
--

Robert Murowchick    <robertmurowchick AT gmail.com>
Needham, MA

Researching these family links:
MUROWCHICK/MURAWCHICK/MURAWCZYK etc (David-Gorodok, Belarus, New Jersey, Chicago)
KUNECK/KONIK/KYONIK (Kozhan-Gorodok, Belarus)
EPSTEIN/EPSTINE (Gavish/Gavieze, Liepaja, Latvia)
SEGAL/SIEGEL (Tilsit, Koenigsburg, Germany; Baltimore; Chicago)


Re: DNA matches with descendants of enslaved African Americans. #usa #general

Judith Elam
 

Hi Brad

I do not have southern USA relatives.  BUT, my 5th great-grandmother, who lived and died in Spandau (now part of Berlin), was married twice. Her name was Lane. I descend from the first husband, Joachim Aron.  Her second husband was Joseph Abraham of Spandau.  Lane and Joseph Abraham had at least 3 more children. One of their grandsons ended up in Jamaica.  He was born in Spandau in 1799 and died in Jamaica.  He went to Jamaica and changed his name from Raphael Levin to Rudolph Lewis.  Rudolph Lewis has hundreds of descendants, all born in Jamaica, although some died in Canada. A good many of them were slave owners.  Here is a record on Ancestry showing slave ownership:  https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/1129/images/CSUK1817_133588-00135?pId=8388519.  I also found many records on Familysearch.org.  

Not sure if the above is of interest to you, but apparently the Lewis family of Manchester, Jamaica, is pretty well known.

So I am related to the Lewis family of Jamaica.  

Judith Elam
Kihei, HI


Re: DNA matches with descendants of enslaved African Americans. #usa #general

Judith Elam
 

Hi Brad

I do not have southern USA relatives.  BUT, my 5th great-grandmother, who lived and died in Spandau (now part of Berlin), was married twice. Her name was Lane. I descend from the first husband, Joachim Aron.  Her second husband was Joseph Abraham of Spandau.  Lane and Joseph Abraham had at least 3 more children. One of their grandsons ended up in Jamaica.  He was born in Spandau in 1799 and died in Jamaica.  He went to Jamaica and changed his name from Raphael Levin to Rudolph Lewis.  Rudolph Lewis has hundreds of descendants, all born in Jamaica, although some died in Canada. A good many of them were slave owners.  Here is a record on Ancestry showing slave ownership:  https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/1129/images/CSUK1817_133588-00135?pId=8388519.  I also found many records on Familysearch.org.  

Not sure if the above is of interest to you, but apparently the Lewis family of Manchester, Jamaica, is pretty well known.

So I am related to the Lewis family of Jamaica.  

Judith Elam
Kihei, HI


Re: Requesting translations from German #germany #translation

Edith Goldman <phal4gal@...>
 

Thank you for your comment but I don't think that's possible, as both my grandparents were German and I don't think either of them spoke Dutch.
Edith Goldman


More translations from German #germany #translation

Edith Goldman <phal4gal@...>
 

I've attached several more of my grandparents' letters, would appreciate if anyone could translate.

Thank you,
Edith Goldman

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