Date   

Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

bobmalakoff@...
 

Among early German Jews Jacob Simon naming his son Simon Jacob was common before family names were used.  The family names were usually required by government edict.  I do not know how common continuing this practice with first name and middle name after a family name was adopted. Naming someone after a living father was not done by Eastern European Jews but maybe not for German Jews.  Based on a German Jewish family that I researched (they occupied my house in Pittsburgh around 1890) Jacob Kaufmann named a son Karl Jacob Kaufmann.  Karl Jacob named his son Karl Jacob Kaufmann Jr.  Other family members used Jr. 
Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh PA 


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

jbonline1111@...
 

LIke Mr. Lerner, I have found my family members with all sorts of names.  In a conversation famous in my family, I told my father that I had found his grandfather's ship passage, but with several names I didn't know.  I told him one.  Oh, he said, that's my aunt Tillie!  Obviously, I was new to genealogy at the time and forgot to ask Hebrew/Yiddish names that might apply.   Another example.  My mother's last name is spelled one way on her birth certificate in 1925 and on other documents.  Her b.c. lists no middle name.  But by 1933, the family name was spelled another way that has persisted to this day. And my mother's Hebrew name became her middle name.  Did I mention that the spelling of her first name was also revised?  The same is true of my grandmother's maiden name and her first name.
In other words, we must be flexible in looking at data we find.  Who else do we find with known relatives?  If they are also known relatives, it's probably our family, regardless of changes in spelling.

 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

David Lewin
 

I have transcribed the burial records to a spreadsheet after  Florence Marmor z"l died,  Florence used me as a back-up for years The data is still waiting for a permanent home.  There are 32,300 entries

David Lewin
London



At 14:31 04/05/2021, A. E. Jordan via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:



-----Original Message-----
From: Nana Redell <nane7012@...>


I recently found out that my grandfather Max LEFKOWITZ who was living in Newark, NJ was buried in the Bayside Cemetery, in Queens, NY.
Nana(nayna) Redell




I am not sure what the current status of Bayside is. There was an effort (the last of many) maybe two years ago to clean it up. But unless they have done ongoing maintenance it would be useless.

The office was ransacked years ago and most of the onsite records lost ... I was actually there before it happened and even then the records were spotty.

I have not been to the cemetery in years and I am not sure what it hours are for visiting as I think they are limited. Also I am not sure it is the best of areas so I wold not go alone. My great grandfather is among the missing at Bayside which is a great personal frustration.

As for finding a grave there are several partial databases of Bayside burials. Check the JOWBR record here at JewishGen to start. Steve Lasky had some records but I don't know what his status is and he had the overall map of the cemetery http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/cp-maps-ny-nj.htm. You could try emailing him to see if he has the person in his records but make sure you give him the date of burial.

Like most cemeteries it is divided into mostly burial societies. You need to find the name of the society and its gate number.

The Jewish Theological Institute has the burial books and you can try emailing them and ask them to give you the data. My experiences with them were difficult and uncooperative.

Also try newspapers and see if you can find a notice for the person's burial because it might give the name of the society.

Without the society name and the gate number it is a nearly impossible search because of the size of the cemetery especially since you said you are looking for a singe grave.

There are two cemeteries bordering Bayside that are separate but in poor condition as well. A lot of people got confused with which of the three cemeteries a person was being buried in so it is not uncommon to find a record saying Bayside but the person is in one of the two adjoining cemeteries.

Wish there was more encouraging news to offer.

Allan Jordan
New York



Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Robert Avner
 

Hi Nana
I haven’t been to Bayside Cemetery since before the pandemic but it hasn’t been the mess you read about on the internet for quite a few years. A number of years ago after a lawsuit the synagogue that owned it had to sell it’s building to raise funds to restore the cemetery. It is one of the three old adjacent Ozone Park Jewish cemeteries with very few current burials & as such would be better if you went with someone as it can be desolate. There is no office on the premises although there is a caretaker & a bathroom. The contact person is Jessie & her phone # 212-874-7005. As of 2019 the hours of the cemetery were just Sunday 9am to 3pm & Wed. 8am to 2pm.
Robert Avner


JGS of Greater Boston May 23 Free Virtual Program on Polish Records 1:30-4:00PM EDT #announcements #events #poland #records

Jessie Klein
 

The JGS of Greater Boston and the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts present Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz-Finding Vital Records from Poland On-line. May 23 1:30-4:00PM EDT. This program is free, but registration is required for individuals who are not members of the JGS of Greater Boston.  Information is at www.jgsgb.org

Jessie Klein
Co-President
JGS of Greater Boston


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Sandy Aaronson
 

I found my gm was buried in Acacia Cemetery from her Death Certificate.  There was an office in NYC that I had previously called to inquire about my gm that handled a number of Cemeteries to include Bayside & Acacia.  In 2014, I was in NY to meet some previously unknown cousins.  One took me to Acacia Cemetery right next to Bayside Cemetery.  We roamed around Bayside, as there wasn't a visible division, trying to find the right place in Acacia & called the office.  There was a nice Gentleman in the area who met us & took us to the right place.  Googling Acacia there is a telephone number...Bayside says owner is Congregation Shaare Zedek.  Both were not kept up very well 7 years ago.
--
Sandy Aaronson
El Paso, Texas

COHEN, LEIBOWITZ, WEISS, SHAIKOFSKY/VOIKHANSKY (Suwalki/Lomza area)
RUBENSTEIN, ARONZUN, KOLICHMAN, GONIKBERG, GREENBERG, LERNER (SW Ukraine/Moldova/Romania)


Re: Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

JoannaYael
 

Pachaiarz krów was a man who supplied cow milk to the landlord, in exchange for allowing him to occupy a płot of land.

Dr. Joanna Yael Zimmerman


Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

JoannaYael
 

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: JoannaYael <jyzimmerman@...>
To: main@...
Cc: 
Bcc: 
Date: Tue, 04 May 2021 06:18:38 -0700
Subject: Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic
Bar Moshe ב״ר משה means in Hebrew Ben Rabbi Moshe, meaning, son of rabbi Moshe (Bar is an abbreviation). Among Ashkenazi Jews, BAR meant usually ‘Ben Reb’ (Reb was a honorific that did not indicate the status of a Rabbi).

Naming a son after his living father was NOT a Jewish custom. 

Dr. Joanna Yael Zimmerman


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

Marshall Lerner
 

I have found that family names (first as well as last), initials, & ages were all very fluid in all manner of census records, immigration records. etc. It seems that interpretation, transliteration, preference & whim mattered more than consistency. Some of those changes are subtle while others are more dramatic. For example my paternal great grandmother immigrated as Scheme Sternberg but appears as Sadie Steinberg in census records & Bat Sheva Alla in other records, etc. My maternal great grandfather immigrated as Moses Eisenberg and appears as Moritz Ajsenberg, Morris Eisenberg, etc. in other family records. My other maternal great grandfather immigrated as Banet Gherbel and appears as Benny Geebel, Benjamin Gabel, Ben Gerbel, etc. in various records.


Marshall Lerner
West Chester, PA


Hessen Gatermann Index Updated #germany #JewishGenUpdates

Alex Calzareth
 

The Hessen Gatermann Index, which contains more than 70,000 records, is one of the largest German databases at Jewishgen.org. Users of this database may have noticed in recent months that the links to view the original records no longer worked after the Hessen archives changed their link formats. We're very happy to report that these links have been updated and you can now easily access the original records again. In addition, the presentation of results has been updated and the entries for marriages now appear in a more compact format.

 

For more information, see JewishGen’s German Research Division webpage and the JewishGen German Collection.

 

Alex Calzareth

Director

German Research Division

acalzareth@...


Re: Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

Alexander Sharon
 

The Polish equivalent of the cotter (at least to the 19th century) was the Pachciarz krów. The term translates as "Cow tenant". One of the functions of the Pachciarz krów was to supply the landowner with milk and other bovine produce.

Alexander Sharon


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

A. E. Jordan
 




-----Original Message-----
From: Nana Redell <nane7012@...>


I recently found out that my grandfather Max LEFKOWITZ who was living in Newark, NJ was buried in the Bayside Cemetery, in Queens, NY.
Nana(nayna) Redell




I am not sure what the current status of Bayside is. There was an effort (the last of many) maybe two years ago to clean it up. But unless they have done ongoing maintenance it would be useless.

The office was ransacked years ago and most of the onsite records lost ... I was actually there before it happened and even then the records were spotty.

I have not been to the cemetery in years and I am not sure what it hours are for visiting as I think they are limited. Also I am not sure it is the best of areas so I wold not go alone. My great grandfather is among the missing at Bayside which is a great personal frustration.

As for finding a grave there are several partial databases of Bayside burials. Check the JOWBR record here at JewishGen to start. Steve Lasky had some records but I don't know what his status is and he had the overall map of the cemetery http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/cp-maps-ny-nj.htm. You could try emailing him to see if he has the person in his records but make sure you give him the date of burial.

Like most cemeteries it is divided into mostly burial societies. You need to find the name of the society and its gate number.

The Jewish Theological Institute has the burial books and you can try emailing them and ask them to give you the data. My experiences with them were difficult and uncooperative.

Also try newspapers and see if you can find a notice for the person's burial because it might give the name of the society.

Without the society name and the gate number it is a nearly impossible search because of the size of the cemetery especially since you said you are looking for a singe grave.

There are two cemeteries bordering Bayside that are separate but in poor condition as well. A lot of people got confused with which of the three cemeteries a person was being buried in so it is not uncommon to find a record saying Bayside but the person is in one of the two adjoining cemeteries.

Wish there was more encouraging news to offer.

Allan Jordan
New York



Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

feinber2@...
 

Many years ago my brother and I went there to look for our maternal ggp’s graves. It was open, but there no help available then, either. The Cemetery is fairly large, but not as big as many of the others in NY. It took us about an hour to find it. 

As an aside, our plan was to look from back to front, each of us having our own territories. Of course, with our luck it was in the front. When we told our mother who was about 75 then, she said “you know, I remember going there as a kid. It was right by the front fence.” 

Good luck. See if some elderly relative can remember anything. If not, prepare to do some work. It feels like striking gold or oil when you find it.

Arthur Feinberg
Kalamazoo MI


Re: Samuel and or Raizel KOSHLAND. maybe from LATVIA #latvia

Reuven Mohr
 

the Koschland's I came across all came from Ichenhausen in Bavarian Swabia. 

Reuven Mohr
Israel


Re: Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

Maciej Łopaciński
 

Pachciarz krów - (fifth letter C) leaseholder of cows

 

Maciej Łopaciński
Maciej.Lopacinski@...

 


New and Updated Databases on IGRA’s Website #israel #announcements

Elena Bazes
 

 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new and updated databases on its website. There are now over 1,900,000 records available in our databases. With each release we provide a variety of records to our collection. 

A preview of the databases are available at

 

https://tinyurl.com/kej5dkx5

 

New Databases

Teachers     1939-1942        

1,725 listings

 

Bat Yam Voters Local Elections    1943      

1,143 listings

 

Immigrants in Communal Settlements      1948
724 listings

 

World Zionist Congress Delegates         1978, 1982, 1987, 1997
4,954 listings

 

 

Updated Databases

 

Voters Knesset Israel    1944     Tel Aviv       Letters vav-zion, tet-kaf
17,118 listings

 

Jerusalem 1947 Census – Jewish Community (partial)

11,302 listings

 

 

Before viewing and searching the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

 

http://genealogy.org.il/

 

Please note, the IGRA databases are now searchable to all registrants. The search results page is also available to all registrants. Additional details regarding most databases are available only to paid IGRA members. Certain exceptions exist due to requests of the specific archives.

 

 

To view/search the databases, go to the database tab on the website.

 

 

Elena Biegel Bazes

IGRA Publicity Chair


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

pathetiq1@...
 

Since Rose Palley and her family arrived in the US in 1906, I don't believe that the 1905 census will make you any wiser about the first name error. 
--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

Hilary Osofsky
 

 I could use some help determining which of two conflicting patronymics provides the given name of a DE BEER ancestor.

According to a summary written by a family member about 25 years ago, "In the year 1742, Jacob Simon Beer signed his name Jakob bar Moscheh Bar in Hebrew." The question is, what was the name of Jacob Simon's father - Simon or Moscheh?

For context, this signature might have been for secular purposes, possibly related to a writ of protection the family was seeking in Emden that year, following their emigration from Amsterdam to Germany. Although we don't have Jacob Simon's date of birth, since he was necessarily an adult in 1742, guesstimating, he was born in the late 1600's or early 1700's, most likely in Amsterdam. There is some speculation that the family originally came from Portugal.

Normally, I would conclude that Jacob Simon's father was Moscheh.

However, Jacob's descendants were very consistent in the naming pattern they used; in every generation, the sons used their father's given name as their middle name. So Simon Jacob, born 1747, named one of his sons Jacob Simon (1774); who named one of his sons Simon Jacob (1808), who named one of his sons Jacob Simon (1853). Presumably, the "bar" was implicit in this patronymic naming scheme. 

If the family naming pattern were decisive here, then the original Jacob Simon's father would be Simon. 

If, however, "bar Moschech" were determinative, then Jacob Simon's father was named Moscheh.  

I'm hoping someone who has some knowledge of naming customs in Amsterdam around the turn of the 18th century can give me some direction.

Thanks very much.

Hilary  Osofsky

California

 

 


Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

Maxwald
 

I am after the correct translation for the polish occupation of PACHAIARZ
KROW.
Literally it means Tenant cow.
Your opions would be welcome.
Max Wald


JGSCNY virtual meeting on Wednesday, May 26 at 6:00 PM EDT - Jewish Cemetery Research in Europe with Dr. V. Fred Chvatal #education #jgs-iajgs #announcements

synhe@...
 

Greetings Genealogists,

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Central New York (JGSCNY) will be on Wednesday, May 26th at 6:00 PM Eastern Time.


Dr. V. Fred Chvatal will speak on "Jewish Cemetery Research in Europe

Fred has been documenting, photographing and restoring Jewish cemeteries of over 180 Jewish cemeteries in Central Europe and Finland. His body of work include over 90 publications on subjects such as methodology of documentation of Jewish cemeteries, theory of the gradually usage of burial area in old rural Jewish cemeteries, comparison research of the Hebrew epigraphy and more. He spoke at several International IAJGS conferences and serve as the Chairman of the Tachov Archive and Museum Society or TAMUS (http://tamus.tachov.org/subdom/tamus/). He lives and work in the town of Tachov that is on the German-Czech border.

 

This webinar is free and open to the public.

To register in advance for this meeting please use the following link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZErceGupj8tHtFUr8FrYtgrzLSs1fTCKzJx



After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with a link and information about joining the meeting.

 

We look forward to "seeing" you

 

Yonat Klein
Syracuse, NY



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