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Re: Old Disease Names Frequently Found on Death Certificates: What Would They be Called Today? #names #general

EdrieAnne Broughton
 

My mother collected old books and among them was a Taber's Medical Dictionary from 1930.  It is a treasure.  Many modern terms and obsolete terms are included.  Now if I could find it easily every time I need it.  It was published early enough that antibiotics that hadn't been invented yet means that conditions that don't even exist are in there, but medicine had advanced far enough that some of the disease mechanisms are understood.  
EdrieAnne Broughton 
California


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Lee Jaffe
 


As a descendant of Schwartz ancestors who is still looking for information about my great-grandfather's past, I took a keen interest in your question and the answers you received.

My experience is that names on passenger records more closely resembled the names used in the Pale and that the name change took place after arriving in the US (e.g., Schwartz recorded on the manifest and Black in Brooklyn).  Your question seems to be assuming the reverse.

Also, I don't believe anyone literally "signed" their passenger record.  As I understand it, the name on a manifest was written by a clerk from the information provided to the steamship company when the passage was arranged.  Thus there was a certain amount of 2nd or 3rd party involvement in what was put down on the passenger record and plenty of room for error.  (My ggm Dora Zarov shows up in a passenger record written as Barow.) 

Tickets could have been purchased in a different name for reasons of ... let's say convenience.  Say a family member already in the US who'd taken the name Black was listed as the party the passenger was joining.  Or a blended or extended family traveling together.  They may decide it's less confusing to immigration to say that your name was Black rather than Shmeggege than explaining why you are joining or traveling with family by the name Black.  I've heard a lot of narratives about a "son" or "wife" listed on a manifest who actually turned out to be a nephew or a widowed sister whose actual name was different than what was recorded.

There is no hard-and-fast rule for name changes.  Black indeed could be a straight-ahead translation of Schwartz but, as others have pointed out, there are variations such as Schwarzman and Schwarzstein, which complicate the search.  My great-grandfather went by the name Joseph Schwartz but the earliest reliable record I can find for him is an 1897 NYC marriage record under the name Schwarzman.  I haven't been able to find a passenger record for any Schwarzman that fits his profile.  At the same time I have a lot of DNA matches with descendants of a Samuel Schwartzstein and I can find 2 passenger records for Jos. Schwarzstein which fit my great-grandfather.   Schwartz, Schwarztein (with and without the extra T) and/or Schwarzman?  I still don't know but it helps to be flexible. 

BTW, family lore said that my great uncle Hyman Schwartz changed his name to J. Herman Black when he moved to Los Angeles.  I wasted a lot of time looking for him under that name before eventually finding volumes of records for him – marriage, divorce, marriage, city directories, death and burial – under Herman J. Schwartz.

Also, as pointed out, there are means of naming or re-naming yourself other than translation.  Black could have been the closest or most familiar rendering a similar sounding name.  If you search "Black" in JewishGen's FamilyFinder the majority of entries are Block, but also Blauk and Black.  I'd guess that Bloch might also be a contender.   It helps that JRI-Poland and other search tools have a sound-alike search function which can help with those hurdles.  I tried searching for JRI-Poland for the name Black and it retrieved almost 700 records, mostly under Bloch.  In 1875, when your ggf made the crossing, Wroclaw was Breslau, Germany.  https://beta.jri-poland.org/town/Wroclaw/
BTW, while the suggestion of Szymel is the common rendering of Samuel in Polish, there are no Szymels in among the records I found.  Samuel is Samuel there.  There are earlier Samuel Blochs in these records and, given Ashkenazi naming traditions, that can be a clue to finding earlier generations.

You may have more success learning your ggf's surname through other strategies or combining strategies.  You don't mention whether the 1875 manifest records the name of someone in the US he was joining.  If so, and if a family member, can be a useful clue.  Look into manifests for any other family that joined him later.  Other records in the US may provide other names: marriage and death records may provide parents' names (and a mother's maiden name may lead to a marriage record ...)  You also don't mention what name your ggf used in the US.  (The fact that you note how he was ID'd on the manifest suggests it was different.)  Do you know where he is buried and do you know what is inscribed on his headstone (father's name and any additional information that can serve as clues about the family)?  And as you build your family tree, pay attention to the more distant cousins who may be a link back to your ggf's birth family.  Also, DNA matches, if you've tested, can point to previously unknown family connections which in turn can identify surnames and home towns.   

Finally, if you are still stuck, it may help to know that this is a pretty common brick wall, trying to trace a family member before they immigrated.  Name changes, sketchy records, missing records ... all are part of the rupture that is created by such historical moments as a mass migration.

Lee David Jaffe

Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland

 


Re: What were conditions like for Jew in Wroclaw, Poland in 1875? #poland #general

Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz
 

Actually, the situation in Breslau in the 1870s was good for Jews, because the foothills of Prussian liberalism still prevailed before Greater German nationalism spread with all its negative effects. Decisions to emigrate are often neither spontaneous nor monocausal.  Therefore, one would have to answer the following questions, among others: how long had the young family been living in the city? Did they have a livelihood? Did the father of the family have strong professional competition in his profession? Were there friends or relatives who also went to America? (Emigrations during this period were often chain reactions.) Could it be that the family was invited by earlier emigrants because they wanted the family in a business in the new location? 
In short, a variety of factors played a role in the decision to emigrate at the time, with political circumstances not always being the answer.

Ruth Leiserowitz
 


Problem matching to Index to record US District Court Brooklyn NY #records

David Levine
 

Help please

What am am I doing wrong?
I have the Petition Number 321008 US District Court at Brooklyn, NY

However when I go to Family Search 
Final petition and citizenship papers (New York), 1865-1958
Statement of Responsibility: Clerk of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of New York
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/988724?availability=Family%20History%20Library
And then to the right section:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS9H-T7YV-8?i=67&cat=988724

The Petition is for someone else?


thanks

--
Best Regards,
David Levine
San Francisco, CA, USA
davidelevine@...
Researching: 
Weinstein -> Solotwina, Galicia | Frisch, Hilman, Jungerman, Schindler -> Rozniatow, Galicia | Golanski, Kramerofsky/Kromerovsky -> Kiev | Lefkowitz -> Petrikov, Belarus | Shub, Rosen Hlusk, Belarus | Levine, Weiner, Zamoshkin -> Slutsk, Belarus 


Re: Hebrew translation on headstone #translation

Renee Steinig
 

Hi Peter,

I did a little searching and found some records that may be helpful.

It appears that Rosie (aka Rose/Rosy/Ray/Rachel Silber) was Hilel's second wife. His first wife, Bertha nee Weitz, was the mother of Jacob (1894-1974). The other children who appear with Hilel and Rosie on censuses -- Irving (1901-1969), Martin (1902-1995), Morris Joel (1904-1991), Mary Sara Glassman (1906-1998), Gussie Marcus (prob. 1910-1991) -- were Rosie's.

According to Rosy/Rachel Silber and Hilel/"Hilet" Wilner's Dec. 1900 marriage records, extracted on FamilySearch.org (there are two records), her parents were Jacob Silber and Malky/Male Grapes/Kraps.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...


On Sat, May 15, 2021 at 11:56 AM Peter Pichler <peterjpichler@...> wrote:

I was hoping someone would be able to translate the Hebrew on the attached headstone for Rosie.  Family lore says that she and my father were "cousins", in fact second cousins, but my research has so far not come up with a connection.  I am trying to find a birth record for her in Galicia and it would be very helpful to see if the headstone would give me any help.

Many thanks

Peter Pichler
_.


Re: Yiddish Language Instructions - Duolingo #yiddish

bobmalakoff@...
 

I did check out the alphabet lessons and I thought they were OK, but since I already knew it it is hard to tell.

It is definitely not the same accent that my mother spoke to her parents.  They came from Belarus.

Speaking of accents I remember growing up when I was learning a little Yiddish I asked my grandmother why it was die television rather than der or das (masculine, feminine and neuter articles).  She said in her Yiddish accent that she was speaking English "t h e television"!

Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh, PA


Re: Hebrew translation on headstone #translation

Malka
 

 

Hello,

On the right-

Here lies or here is buried (abbreviation on top)

Hilel son of Dov Bear

Passed 9 Adar 5707

May his soul be gathered in eternal life

 

On the left –

Here lies or here is buried

Rachel

Daughter of Ya’akov

Passed 13 Iyar 5711

May her soul be gathered in eternal life

Shalom,
Malka Chosnek


Re: How to track naturalization number codes written later on passenger manifests #records

Laurie Sosna
 

This article has the explanation of the manifest markings
https://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/manifests/occ/

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

JoannaYael
 

Likely, (Polish spelling), Szmul Szwarc or any name including szwarc (like, Szwarcberg, Szwarcman, Szwarcenbaum/Szwarcenboim, etc.).
The German spelling is Schwartz/Schwartzberg/Schwarcman or Schwartzmann, etc. 
Samuel could have been Szmul, Szmul, Szmul.
However, the first name might have not been a precise translation of Samuel, and you may consider other names with the same initial (Szaia, Szya, Shaja, etc.

Dr. Joanna Zimmerman 


Re: Dora nee Grossman & George Cohen, their three sons Kenneth, Jerome and Robert Lefrak City, NY #usa #general

pathetiq1@...
 

Some information about George Cohen's family, 

His parents Samuel Cohen and Jennie Rappaport got married in 1904
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:24ML-TPW

Apparently you a were wrong about his birth year. It was 1908 and not 1910.  His Jewish name was Joseph and this name appears in documents until the early 30s. Here are birth records for him and his brothers as well as his sister's death record. 
https://www.familysearch.org/search/record/results?q.surname=Cohen&q.fatherGivenName=Sam*&q.fatherGivenName.exact=on&q.motherGivenName=Je*&q.motherGivenName.exact=on&q.motherSurname=R*rt&q.motherSurname.exact=on&count=100&offset=0&m.defaultFacets=on&m.queryRequireDefault=on&m.facetNestCollectionInCategory=on

The family in the 1910 census 
 https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M5ZH-WR5

1915 census 
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K92R-FGZ

1920 census 
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJB1-YS5

1930 census  (notice that family lives at 696 Watkins Str, the one that appears in his marriage certificate) 
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X7XM-DK9

George Cohen died in Bronx on Oct 29, 1994. In the social security application and claims index you will find the number of his death certificate. If you manage to obtain it, you will be able to discover where he was burried. 
https://www.ancestry.com/search/?name=George_Cohen&birth=1908&death=1994&birth_x=0-0-0_1-0&count=50&death_x=0-0-0_1-0&name_x=1_1


--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


Re: How to correct errors in JewishGen's JOWBR database? #JewishGenUpdates

Nolan Altman
 

If you have corrections for the JOWBR database, please see the "Corrections" paragraph in the last section of the "Submitting Data to JOWBR" page at  https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm 

Nolan ALTMAN


Re: Different date on birth record #romania #records #yizkorbooks

jbonline1111@...
 

My maternal grandfather was born in what is now Belarus and did not know his birth date, just that it was during Passover, so his children "gave" him a birthday, April 15.  

My father's birth certificate says he was born in NYC on March 30, 1917, but we always celebrated his birthday on March 29, because "my mother said that's the day I was born."

While the notion that that October 22 was the date of the bris and well might be the correct answer in this case, as my family history shows, there are many reasons that exact birth dates are not known.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


How to track naturalization number codes written later on passenger manifests #records

David Levine
 

Hi everyone,

Is it possible to trace the numerical code added to an individual entry on the original passenger manifest when they were in the process of naturalization?
In the screenshot below, the number is clearly legible
Can I cross reference it (or a part) in naturalization records to tie it to the person in the US?
This looks like 2-723161-505 - 4/15/40
Many Thanks
David

--
Best Regards,
David Levine
San Francisco, CA, USA
davidelevine@...
Researching: 
Weinstein -> Solotwina, Galicia | Frisch, Hilman, Jungerman, Schindler -> Rozniatow, Galicia | Golanski, Kramerofsky/Kromerovsky -> Kiev | Lefkowitz -> Petrikov, Belarus | Shub, Rosen Hlusk, Belarus | Levine, Weiner, Zamoshkin -> Slutsk, Belarus 


Hebrew translation on headstone #translation

Peter Pichler
 

I was hoping someone would be able to translate the Hebrew on the attached headstone for Rosie.  Family lore says that she and my father were "cousins", in fact second cousins, but my research has so far not come up with a connection.  I am trying to find a birth record for her in Galicia and it would be very helpful to see if the headstone would give me any help.

Many thanks

Peter Pichler


Re: Old Disease Names Frequently Found on Death Certificates: What Would They be Called Today? #names #general

Mel Comisarow
 

"General paralysis of the insane" is (late stage) syphilis.

Mel Comisarow
Vancouver BC


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Karen Lukeman
 

On a recent Finding Your Roots genealogy show on PBS, it turns out the original surname of comedian Lewis Black's family was "Blech". 
--
Karen Calmon Lukeman
KALMANOWITZ (Lyubcha and towns near Grodno, Vilna and Minsk)
GOLDSMITH (Bakshty and Ivje)
NASSER (Damascus)
BENBAJI (Damascus)
BALLAS (Damascus)


Re: Yiddish Language Instructions - Duolingo #yiddish

rroth@...
 

I have also started this course and am enjoying it.

If you want to try, I suggest you first learn the Yiddish (Hebrew) alphabet somewhere else, as the early lessons in Duolingo are a good drill for reviving your knowlege of it but not I think very good for learning the letters from scratch.  There are phone and computer flashcard apps that do this better.

Can someone who knows Yiddish say something about the speakers? I realize many accents are available and the whole Litvak/Galizianer thing plays into it, but some of the words do not sound like I expect. Official instructors elsewhere speak YIVO but real people on the street speak in other ways, similar to how the Spanish you hear in NYC does not sound like what you might hear in Madrid.

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Larry Gaum
 

I suggest Shiah Schwartz or Shmuel Schwartz
Larry Gaum
Toronto, ON.


Re: Old Disease Names Frequently Found on Death Certificates: What Would They be Called Today? #names #general

rroth@...
 

"Mellitus" means sweet, to distinguish this ordinary diabetes from the less-familiar diabetes insipidus, meaning "bland", a completely different condition which still exists but is not much known to the general public. All the two have in common is frequent urination. Tasting the urine to tell them apart has gone out of fashion.

==========
Robert Roth MD
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


Re: Different date on birth record #romania #records #yizkorbooks

luc.radu@...
 

Few notes:
1) Romania adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1919. There are 12-13 days difference from the Julian used.
2) The date in the  birth ledger is the date when the entry was made by the Civil Office clerk. Usually that is 1-2 days from the DOB but that day is always mentioned. Unless you have a picture of the actual record, it is unclear what the Archive transcript has provided.
3) A discrepancy of the size mentioned is very small.   In most cases  (thousands) I have seen, the date, and even the year in the US records does not match the actual DOB.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

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