Date   

Free Webinar with Dr Janette Silverman , May 23rd Researching in Easter Europe #events #announcements

Vivs
 

Please share with anyone whom you believe will be interested.
Join us May 23rd at Noon Pacific Time (google what time is it in Los Angeles if you need help converting 😊 for a world class lecturer on Eastern European and Jewish Genealogy, Janette Silverman!  
"Join me in a recap of  a 27 day trip my team and I took to find documents and context for research projects. We drove to Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, Romania and Moldova in search of elusive documents and to discover what various towns might have looked like 100+ years ago, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. We’ll stop in a few of the places so you have an overview of what researching on the ground was like. We’ll discuss some general challenges and what can be accomplished. Perhaps in future talks we’ll take a more in-depth look at archives in specific countries and  look at types of documents that can be found."
Dr. Janette Silverman is a professional genealogist, heading a team of researchers specializing in Eastern European and Jewish research at AncestryProGenealogists® the division of Ancestry® that does private client research. Her research on behalf of clients takes her all over the U.S. and Europe.
Janette holds a Doctorate in Jewish Studies from Spertus Institute. Her dissertation, "In Living Memory" explored her family's journey from Europe to the U.S. from the 1880s to the 1920s, contextualizing their experiences.
Her journey into genealogy began over 40 years ago as a hobby with her dad. It became an obsession and the two of them could be found at family gatherings asking endless questions. Her mom taught her to love jigsaw puzzles as a child. The lessons she learned from that are to look at problems and their solutions from many different angles.
Janette speaks at conferences all over the world, now virtually, but previously in person. She has published articles on genealogical research in The Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly, The Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Avotaynu, and Galitzianer. Most recently, she wrote "Genealogy at a Glance: Finding Eastern European Jewish Ancestors," part of the Genealogy at a Glance series. Except during this period of COVID, she travels extensively in Eastern Europe doing archival research and accompanying clients on visits to their ancestral villages.
Register at this link
Sponsored by the E-Y6923 Jewish YDNA Project
--
Vivs Laliberte
www.theOCGG.com

Orange County, Calfiornia


Re: Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Frank Szmulowicz
 

How about the simple Schwarz, which is German for black.
Frank Szmulowicz


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

flmillner@...
 

Thank you, Lee, for a thorough response.  One point:  Shimel/Szymel is Yiddish for Simon.  Szmuel/Shmuil is homophonic search-wise but is Samuel.  My ggf Shmuil had a brother Shimel.
Fred Millner
flmillner@...


Re: What happened to Lilli Karoline Loeb? #names #usa

Diane Jacobs
 

Several things come to mind for you to search.

1.  Try stevemorse.org  for NYC death and marriage indexes 

 2. Look up NYC Directories for 1946 and after.

3. The 1950 US census is due to be public info
Next year.  This could help you find her in NYC 
Or elsewhere.

Good luck.

Diane Jacobs


On May 15, 2021, at 9:49 PM, rlmeher via groups.jewishgen.org <rlmeher=aol.com@...> wrote:



I am trying to find out what happened to my Aunt, Lilli Karoline Loeb.  I know that she was born  on 10 October 1912 in Sprendlingen, Germany.    ( I am also interested in joining a Sprendlingen research group. ) I have been able to discover that she fled Germany to work as a nurse at the City Hospital in Nottingham, UK in 1939.   Nov. 7, 1940 she came to the US on the ship ‘Samaria’.   Then she joined her brother, Arthur Anselm Loeb, in Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1941.  She lived with him and his wife Edith Loeb  (nee Zodner).  Finally, she made her way to New York City in 1946.  Her address at the time was in Washington Heights, NYC.

 

After 1946, I can not find any information. I do not know if she married, or if she left the United States or if she died.   I have requested marriage or death records from NYC but there are no records for her.   If anyone has any ideas of where I could continue to research please let me know.

Ramona Meher


--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Obtaining German Citizenship under Article 116 #germany

Richard Oppenheimer
 

A number of you have recently asked questions about obtaining German Citizenship under Article 116. I have just completed the process and received my German citizenship Certificate on May 14, 2021. I started the process in April of 2019. I did everything by myself without the assistance of an attorney. Both of my parents were born in Germany, I was born in the US. I live in Florida, so I contacted the German Embassy in Miami. You must use the Embassy that has jurisdiction of where you live. I was able to obtain birth records of both my parents through the local archives in Germany. Both of my parents are deceased. Additional documents such as proof of my parent’s residency in US, my parents’ marriage certificate, my birth certificate, and my parent’s naturalization certificates for US Citizenship rounded out the documentation needed to apply. I was also asked to provide birth information of all four grandparents. I was told the entire process should take between 18 and 24 months. I mailed all of the documents, which needed to be notarized (in the US) to the Embassy in Miami. Miami mailed the package to Germany for processing. No tests of German history or German language skills were given. The German embassy in Miami reviewed all of my documents prior to sending them to Germany. The Miami embassy asked for a few more details, but once they reviewed it, no one came back to me for more information.

Last week, exactly 22 months since I started the process, I was notified to come to the Embassy in person to pick up my Naturalization Certificate and simultaneously apply for a German passport. This must be done in person. The passport should be mailed to me 6 weeks after submitting the application. I looked at the German Embassy website today, and the process now is estimated to take between 24 and 36 months.

I hope this answers many of your questions. Feel free to email me directly if you have any more questions.

 

 

Richard Oppenheimer

Venice Florida

 


--
Richard Oppenheimer
Venice, Florida, USA


New York Deed Research #usa #general

Judy Floam
 

Is there a way to research deeds in Manhattan on-line?   If not, how can I do it in person?  I am trying to find out when my grandparents bought the building they lived in (I’m guessing it was in the 1920s or 30s).   Thank you.

 

Judy Floam

Baltimore, MD

 


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Reuven Mohr
 

"when he arrived in the U.S. in 1875 from Wroclaw, Poland." makes no sense.
If you mean Wroclaw in Silesia, it was a German city till 1945, so Polish spellings are not relevant.
If you mean another Polish city, the spelling is probably different.

Reuven Mohr, Israel


Re: Yiddish Language Instructions - Duolingo #yiddish

Bernard Miller
 

Thanks for that useful piece of information. 

I have been using Duolingo over the past few months either to refresh, activate or learn and have found it useful (but sometimes very annoying) but I will certainly give the Yiddish a try.

I was looking for a Catalan course and they do one from Spanish (which I have now completed) and I would be interested in a Ladino course (uTalk do one). And I have used it to refresh my Portuguese and am hoping to revive my Hebrew with it.

Bernard Miller
London, England


Re: Perkels in Belarus #belarus

Louis Zetler
 

There are/were PERKELs in South Africa

Louis Zetler


Re: Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Israel P
 

Samuel could have been any of a  dozen Jewish given names or maybe something not connected at all.

Black could be a translation, in which case it would depend on the place he came from. Or it could be a "sounds like."

Israel Pickholtz
Ashkelon
allmyforeparents.blogspot.com
endogamy-one-family.com

My genealogy research is electric.
It follows the path of least resistance.


Prero, Rosenblum and Schwimmer from Munkacz #subcarpathia #galicia #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

My g-g-gf was Israel Schwimmer of Munkacz. I have found records related to his sister, Brane. The 1874 second marriage for Brane Schwimmer of Munkacz (daughter of Jakob Svimmer and Szure), lists her as a widow, marrying Israel Abraham ROSENBLUM, a widower, Talmud teacher, son of Beniamin [Rosenblum], and Beile Klein, born Rÿmánow in Galicia. You can see that marriage record here: 
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/memberadmin/responselist.asp?showmaster=1&viewmateid=80882

I have found earlier records in Munkacz showing children born to a Brane Schwimmer and Lazar (Eliezer) PRERO (but no marriage record yet). It seems possible that these two Brane's, PRERO and ROSENBLUM, are the same person, as the births for the Prero children stop about 1872, prior to Brane's being widowed. 

Would anyone have knowledge of any of these families? I am looking for some record of family history to bolster or deny my theory.

Stay safe,
--

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@...
JGFF #3391


Re: How to track naturalization number codes written later on passenger manifests #records

David Oseas
 

David,

In addition to the info in the JewishGen Manifest Markings Infofile that Laurie pointed you to, here are a couple of observations that I've made during my naturalization research that might help you:
  • unfortunately, there isn't an index that cross references the number in the naturalization verification marking (the Certificate of Arrival request) and petition number
  • the number before the dash will help you pinpoint the district in which the person filed for naturalization
  • the naturalization verification date can help you locate a possible naturalization in a naturalization index collection.  While there are no hard & fast rules regarding dates, the majority of the cases that I've researched have a CofA date from 2 weeks to 4 months prior to filing their petition and the petition date is 4 months to 1 year prior to their citizenship certificate date (which is the date shown in naturalization indexes).  So, I would look in an index for a naturalization with a date from 4.5 months to 1.5 years after the verification date.  Of course, there are exceptions: in one case, the CofA verification occurred 6 months after the petition was filed.
  • only about 50% of the folks that I've researched that were issued a 505 form rather than a CofA ever went on to successfully naturalize (and none of the folks that had received a 404 ever naturalized).
Regards,
David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York;  KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
KRONOWITH:
Hungary > New York;  OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER/SHEKTER: Kishinev, Bessarabia > New York;  SHERMAN: Iasi, Romania > New York > Los Angeles
STRUL:  Iasi, Romania > Haifa, Israel;  WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Leslie
 

In response to: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black?

It is possible that the name is Blach (German Jews have changed their Blach name to Black).

Leslie Koelsch


What happened to Lilli Karoline Loeb? #names #usa

rlmeher@...
 

I am trying to find out what happened to my Aunt, Lilli Karoline Loeb.  I know that she was born  on 10 October 1912 in Sprendlingen, Germany.    ( I am also interested in joining a Sprendlingen research group. ) I have been able to discover that she fled Germany to work as a nurse at the City Hospital in Nottingham, UK in 1939.   Nov. 7, 1940 she came to the US on the ship ‘Samaria’.   Then she joined her brother, Arthur Anselm Loeb, in Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1941.  She lived with him and his wife Edith Loeb  (nee Zodner).  Finally, she made her way to New York City in 1946.  Her address at the time was in Washington Heights, NYC.

 

After 1946, I can not find any information. I do not know if she married, or if she left the United States or if she died.   I have requested marriage or death records from NYC but there are no records for her.   If anyone has any ideas of where I could continue to research please let me know.

Ramona Meher


Re: Problem matching to Index to record US District Court Brooklyn NY #records

Susan&David
 

You are reading the Petition number incorrectly. It is 321008. 

David Rosen




On 5/15/2021 5:11 PM, David Levine wrote:
Help please

What am am I doing wrong?
I have the Petition Number 321008 US District Court at Brooklyn, NY

However when I go to Family Search 
Final petition and citizenship papers (New York), 1865-1958
Statement of Responsibility: Clerk of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of New York
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/988724?availability=Family%20History%20Library
And then to the right section:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS9H-T7YV-8?i=67&cat=988724

The Petition is for someone else?


thanks

--
Best Regards,
David Levine
San Francisco, CA, USA
davidelevine@...
Researching: 
Weinstein -> Solotwina, Galicia | Frisch, Hilman, Jungerman, Schindler -> Rozniatow, Galicia | Golanski, Kramerofsky/Kromerovsky -> Kiev | Lefkowitz -> Petrikov, Belarus | Shub, Rosen Hlusk, Belarus | Levine, Weiner, Zamoshkin -> Slutsk, Belarus 


Re: Old Disease Names Frequently Found on Death Certificates: What Would They be Called Today? #names #general

EdrieAnne Broughton
 

My mother collected old books and among them was a Taber's Medical Dictionary from 1930.  It is a treasure.  Many modern terms and obsolete terms are included.  Now if I could find it easily every time I need it.  It was published early enough that antibiotics that hadn't been invented yet means that conditions that don't even exist are in there, but medicine had advanced far enough that some of the disease mechanisms are understood.  
EdrieAnne Broughton 
California


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Lee Jaffe
 


As a descendant of Schwartz ancestors who is still looking for information about my great-grandfather's past, I took a keen interest in your question and the answers you received.

My experience is that names on passenger records more closely resembled the names used in the Pale and that the name change took place after arriving in the US (e.g., Schwartz recorded on the manifest and Black in Brooklyn).  Your question seems to be assuming the reverse.

Also, I don't believe anyone literally "signed" their passenger record.  As I understand it, the name on a manifest was written by a clerk from the information provided to the steamship company when the passage was arranged.  Thus there was a certain amount of 2nd or 3rd party involvement in what was put down on the passenger record and plenty of room for error.  (My ggm Dora Zarov shows up in a passenger record written as Barow.) 

Tickets could have been purchased in a different name for reasons of ... let's say convenience.  Say a family member already in the US who'd taken the name Black was listed as the party the passenger was joining.  Or a blended or extended family traveling together.  They may decide it's less confusing to immigration to say that your name was Black rather than Shmeggege than explaining why you are joining or traveling with family by the name Black.  I've heard a lot of narratives about a "son" or "wife" listed on a manifest who actually turned out to be a nephew or a widowed sister whose actual name was different than what was recorded.

There is no hard-and-fast rule for name changes.  Black indeed could be a straight-ahead translation of Schwartz but, as others have pointed out, there are variations such as Schwarzman and Schwarzstein, which complicate the search.  My great-grandfather went by the name Joseph Schwartz but the earliest reliable record I can find for him is an 1897 NYC marriage record under the name Schwarzman.  I haven't been able to find a passenger record for any Schwarzman that fits his profile.  At the same time I have a lot of DNA matches with descendants of a Samuel Schwartzstein and I can find 2 passenger records for Jos. Schwarzstein which fit my great-grandfather.   Schwartz, Schwarztein (with and without the extra T) and/or Schwarzman?  I still don't know but it helps to be flexible. 

BTW, family lore said that my great uncle Hyman Schwartz changed his name to J. Herman Black when he moved to Los Angeles.  I wasted a lot of time looking for him under that name before eventually finding volumes of records for him – marriage, divorce, marriage, city directories, death and burial – under Herman J. Schwartz.

Also, as pointed out, there are means of naming or re-naming yourself other than translation.  Black could have been the closest or most familiar rendering a similar sounding name.  If you search "Black" in JewishGen's FamilyFinder the majority of entries are Block, but also Blauk and Black.  I'd guess that Bloch might also be a contender.   It helps that JRI-Poland and other search tools have a sound-alike search function which can help with those hurdles.  I tried searching for JRI-Poland for the name Black and it retrieved almost 700 records, mostly under Bloch.  In 1875, when your ggf made the crossing, Wroclaw was Breslau, Germany.  https://beta.jri-poland.org/town/Wroclaw/
BTW, while the suggestion of Szymel is the common rendering of Samuel in Polish, there are no Szymels in among the records I found.  Samuel is Samuel there.  There are earlier Samuel Blochs in these records and, given Ashkenazi naming traditions, that can be a clue to finding earlier generations.

You may have more success learning your ggf's surname through other strategies or combining strategies.  You don't mention whether the 1875 manifest records the name of someone in the US he was joining.  If so, and if a family member, can be a useful clue.  Look into manifests for any other family that joined him later.  Other records in the US may provide other names: marriage and death records may provide parents' names (and a mother's maiden name may lead to a marriage record ...)  You also don't mention what name your ggf used in the US.  (The fact that you note how he was ID'd on the manifest suggests it was different.)  Do you know where he is buried and do you know what is inscribed on his headstone (father's name and any additional information that can serve as clues about the family)?  And as you build your family tree, pay attention to the more distant cousins who may be a link back to your ggf's birth family.  Also, DNA matches, if you've tested, can point to previously unknown family connections which in turn can identify surnames and home towns.   

Finally, if you are still stuck, it may help to know that this is a pretty common brick wall, trying to trace a family member before they immigrated.  Name changes, sketchy records, missing records ... all are part of the rupture that is created by such historical moments as a mass migration.

Lee David Jaffe

Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland

 


Re: What were conditions like for Jew in Wroclaw, Poland in 1875? #poland #general

Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz
 

Actually, the situation in Breslau in the 1870s was good for Jews, because the foothills of Prussian liberalism still prevailed before Greater German nationalism spread with all its negative effects. Decisions to emigrate are often neither spontaneous nor monocausal.  Therefore, one would have to answer the following questions, among others: how long had the young family been living in the city? Did they have a livelihood? Did the father of the family have strong professional competition in his profession? Were there friends or relatives who also went to America? (Emigrations during this period were often chain reactions.) Could it be that the family was invited by earlier emigrants because they wanted the family in a business in the new location? 
In short, a variety of factors played a role in the decision to emigrate at the time, with political circumstances not always being the answer.

Ruth Leiserowitz
 


Problem matching to Index to record US District Court Brooklyn NY #records

David Levine
 

Help please

What am am I doing wrong?
I have the Petition Number 321008 US District Court at Brooklyn, NY

However when I go to Family Search 
Final petition and citizenship papers (New York), 1865-1958
Statement of Responsibility: Clerk of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of New York
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/988724?availability=Family%20History%20Library
And then to the right section:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS9H-T7YV-8?i=67&cat=988724

The Petition is for someone else?


thanks

--
Best Regards,
David Levine
San Francisco, CA, USA
davidelevine@...
Researching: 
Weinstein -> Solotwina, Galicia | Frisch, Hilman, Jungerman, Schindler -> Rozniatow, Galicia | Golanski, Kramerofsky/Kromerovsky -> Kiev | Lefkowitz -> Petrikov, Belarus | Shub, Rosen Hlusk, Belarus | Levine, Weiner, Zamoshkin -> Slutsk, Belarus 


Re: Hebrew translation on headstone #translation

Renee Steinig
 

Hi Peter,

I did a little searching and found some records that may be helpful.

It appears that Rosie (aka Rose/Rosy/Ray/Rachel Silber) was Hilel's second wife. His first wife, Bertha nee Weitz, was the mother of Jacob (1894-1974). The other children who appear with Hilel and Rosie on censuses -- Irving (1901-1969), Martin (1902-1995), Morris Joel (1904-1991), Mary Sara Glassman (1906-1998), Gussie Marcus (prob. 1910-1991) -- were Rosie's.

According to Rosy/Rachel Silber and Hilel/"Hilet" Wilner's Dec. 1900 marriage records, extracted on FamilySearch.org (there are two records), her parents were Jacob Silber and Malky/Male Grapes/Kraps.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...


On Sat, May 15, 2021 at 11:56 AM Peter Pichler <peterjpichler@...> wrote:

I was hoping someone would be able to translate the Hebrew on the attached headstone for Rosie.  Family lore says that she and my father were "cousins", in fact second cousins, but my research has so far not come up with a connection.  I am trying to find a birth record for her in Galicia and it would be very helpful to see if the headstone would give me any help.

Many thanks

Peter Pichler
_.

3961 - 3980 of 662772