Date   

Re: Translation of Polish shtetel names to Polish/English #translation #yiddish #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

1 Aleksandrów Kujawski and Aleksandrow Łódzki in Poland, and Aleksandriya, Wołyń region, Ukraine
2. Droyanov - Trayanov (Polish: Trajanów), Zhitomir area, Wołyń region, Ukraine
3. Pomoza - Pomoryany (Polish: Pomorzany), Zlochev, Tarnopol region, Ukraine
4. Hanovak - Hajnowka, Białystok region, Poland

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

In Jewish law, an uncle may marry his niece, but an aunt may not marry her nephew. What people actually did is something else, sometimes.

My 2nd ggrandfather married his niece after his first wife died. His 4 sons left for America around the same time.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Re: USCIS Documents #records

David Harrison
 

The rules in Britain have been somewhat different and I expect that they differ elsewhere, but in a similar timeframe.  My Grandfather came to these shores in the late 1800s but did not apply for British citizen ship until about 1912.  On the document is shown his name and all the children but not his wife (who was included as being part of him.  I learnt this while searching the records some years ago.  It seems that as a result, she needed to apply for citizenship in her own within a year of his death. I doubt that she or the children knew this.  The fact that he died in May 1943 and she died in April 1944 which saved her (and the family) having this problem.  My other grandparents were both born here and did not have this problem.  I was lucky to be able to ask this question of a member of staff at The National Archive, he had to ask another member of staff.  Also, the Married Womans' Property Act did not cover this situation.

David Harrison,  Birmingham, England


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Howard Aronoff <howard6276@...>
Sent: 18 May 2021 14:22
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] USCIS Documents #records
 

RE: GRANDMOTHERS NATURALIZATION; this may be useful: https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization-1.html

From above link:

New laws of the mid-1800s opened an era when a woman's ability to naturalize became dependent upon her marital status. The act of February 10, 1855, was designed to benefit immigrant women. Under that act, "[a]ny woman who is now or may hereafter be married to a citizen of the United States, and who might herself be lawfully naturalized, shall be deemed a citizen."

Later in the above link:

Happily, Congress was at work and on September 22, 1922, passed the Married Women's Act, also known as the Cable Act. This 1922 law finally gave each woman a nationality of her own. No marriage since that date has granted U.S. citizenship to any alien woman nor taken it from any U.S.-born women who married an alien eligible to naturalization.(11) Under the new law women became eligible to naturalize on (almost) the same terms as men. The only difference concerned those women whose husbands had already naturalized. If her husband was a citizen, the wife did not need to file a declaration of intention. She could initiate naturalization proceedings with a petition alone (one-paper naturalization). A woman whose husband remained an alien had to start at the beginning, with a declaration of intention. It is important to note that women who lost citizenship by marriage and regained it under Cable Act naturalization provisions could file in any naturalization court--regardless of her residence.(12)

Both of my Grandmothers were listed on my Grandfather's naturalization papers which were filed in 1915 and 1916. I believe that my Grandmothers never applied directly but that when my Grandfathers petitions were honored, they, as listed spouses, automatically became citizens. 

Howard Aronoff
Boynton Beach FL
howard6276@...


Re: USCIS Documents #records

Myrna Waters
 

I recently heard a presentation on this subject given by Marian Smith to the JGSSN (JGS of Southern Nevada) via Zoom.  She is retired after 30 years working for the USCIS.  Perhaps you can contact the group or go to their website and see if you can contact her directly.  There was a handout along with the presentation that shows which records can be found at the various locations for such records, depending on when the immigration was and when the paperwork to become a US citizen was filed.  Good luck to you.
--
Myrna (Slatnick) Waters
NJ/NY/FL USA

Researching:  SLEPACK (or similar)Belarus/Bialystok area; SLATNICK/SLOTNIK (or similar) Minsk/Puchovichi area of Russia from 1905/1914 to NY & Newark,NJ and Canada;  KURZMANN Jaslo, Poland and Drohobych, Ukraine area (both formerly in what was the Galician area of Austria prior to WWI), KURTZMAN in NY/Bronx and NJ/Newark from 1905/1910, SADOWSKY (or similar) from Belarus area of Russia/Bialystok 19th century to Newark,NJ 1905 or after.


Re: Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Elynn Boss
 

I have one great grandfather that took the first name of Sam - his Hebrew name was Sheftel.

I have another great grandfather that also took the name of Sam even though his older brother had taken that name also.  He was naturalized under Sam (as was his older brother), but later changed his name to Joshua which was close to his Yiddish name of Gesua.  His Polish name was Osvey. 

As Sally stated - Sam was very popular.
--
Elynn Boss
Frisco, Texas, United States
bossgen_1@...
Searching: Abrahams (New York); Gichtin/Gechtin/Gertin (Buffalo, New York and Canada); Dreishpoon (New York, Russia, France), Danovitch/Daynes (New York, Massachusetts, Poland/Russia) and associated branches.


Re: Dora Cohon nee Azarin #ukraine

Sherri Bobish
 

Beth,

Ekaterinoslav is today Dnipro, Ukraine.
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1037865

Have you searched for records at:
JewishGen Ukraine Database
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/

Try a soundex search on surnames.  Names get spelled in variant ways in these records.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Myrna Waters
 

My family came from a small town about 35 mi. SE of Minsk.  Two of the sons became Sam's in the USA. 
Their names on the ship manifest list were Schmerel and Schlajme.  
--
Myrna (Slatnick) Waters
NJ/NY/FL USA

Researching:  SLEPACK (or similar)Belarus/Bialystok area; SLATNICK/SLOTNIK (or similar) Minsk/Puchovichi area of Russia from 1905/1914 to NY & Newark,NJ and Canada;  KURZMANN Jaslo, Poland and Drohobych, Ukraine area (both formerly in what was the Galician area of Austria prior to WWI), KURTZMAN in NY/Bronx and NJ/Newark from 1905/1910, SADOWSKY (or similar) from Belarus area of Russia/Bialystok 19th century to Newark,NJ 1905 or after.


Re: Help Identifying Town Name on Dec of Intention #galicia

Sherri Bobish
 

Sheri,

I agree with Lee that it reads "a widower."

Did they marry in The U.S., or prior to arriving here?  If they were married before coming to The U.S. than they possibly came from either the same or nearby towns.

Have you found their passenger manifest(s)?

Do you know what town ggf was born?  You can search for town records at:  https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

David Goldman
 

Hi, Jeffrey. Given the context and time involved back in the 18th century, assuming the couple married religiously as well as civilly, it is unlikely that the actual relationship was that of an aunt and a nephew since such a marriage is forbidden under religious law (halacha). In all likelihood either the groom or bride was a step-relative or adopted child, which would mean the marriage would be permissible under halacha.  Thus Michel must have been an adopted or step-son to Meyer, or alternatively, Rane was an adopted or step-sister of Meyer.  This seems more likely given the fact that Rane was significantly older than Michel and would have been considered to be an "old maid." It would be quite common to try to marry off an "old maid" to anyone just so she could be married. Thus it would suggest that Rane must have been a stepsister or adopted/foster sister of Meyer.
David Goldman
NYC


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

jbonline1111@...
 

Re Vivian Cohen's comment: a friend of mine is married to a man who is 10-15 years younger than she. They have two children from their union, both of whom are adults now. It's uncommon but it occurs now and I don't doubt it occasionally occurred in prior centuries for various reasons.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Atlantic Park, Eastleigh, England

lee.desty@...
 

Hi Michael
I'm new to JewishGen . I joined to help my research into a book I'm currently writing on Atlantic Park Hostel at Southampton from 1922 to 1931.
I'm retired now from my job as a BBC TV News Editor and UK journalist 😊.I live a few miles from where the hostel was - which today is Southampton Airport.
I started the project in 2016 , had to put to one side for personal reasons, and have returned to it during the Covid lockdown.
I'm interested in your photos and newsletter - I don't know if you set up the web site or had any response to your post ?
My email is lee.desty@...
Regards
Lee Desty (Mr) Southampton UK.


Re: USCIS Documents #records

Howard Aronoff <howard6276@...>
 

RE: GRANDMOTHERS NATURALIZATION; this may be useful: https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization-1.html

From above link:

New laws of the mid-1800s opened an era when a woman's ability to naturalize became dependent upon her marital status. The act of February 10, 1855, was designed to benefit immigrant women. Under that act, "[a]ny woman who is now or may hereafter be married to a citizen of the United States, and who might herself be lawfully naturalized, shall be deemed a citizen."

Later in the above link:

Happily, Congress was at work and on September 22, 1922, passed the Married Women's Act, also known as the Cable Act. This 1922 law finally gave each woman a nationality of her own. No marriage since that date has granted U.S. citizenship to any alien woman nor taken it from any U.S.-born women who married an alien eligible to naturalization.(11) Under the new law women became eligible to naturalize on (almost) the same terms as men. The only difference concerned those women whose husbands had already naturalized. If her husband was a citizen, the wife did not need to file a declaration of intention. She could initiate naturalization proceedings with a petition alone (one-paper naturalization). A woman whose husband remained an alien had to start at the beginning, with a declaration of intention. It is important to note that women who lost citizenship by marriage and regained it under Cable Act naturalization provisions could file in any naturalization court--regardless of her residence.(12)

Both of my Grandmothers were listed on my Grandfather's naturalization papers which were filed in 1915 and 1916. I believe that my Grandmothers never applied directly but that when my Grandfathers petitions were honored, they, as listed spouses, automatically became citizens. 

Howard Aronoff
Boynton Beach FL
howard6276@...


Headstone transcription #translation

Timothy Farrell
 

I am looking for someone to translate the two headstones I have attached. Thank you in advance.

--
Timothy Farrell
timrock22 @ yahoo.com


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

viviansilco@...
 

Hi, Jeffrey,

It's legal that cousins or relatives married one another, but seems unlikely, or at least very uncommon,  that a guy married a woman 15 years older than him.  And even so, she would be at least 32-35 years old when she married, not easy at that age to start a big family.  

That's what I think, but you never know.

Regards,
Vivian Silbermann Cohen, Mevasseret


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

Judith Singer
 

Definitely considered proper, and likewise for an uncle and his niece. In a family I am researching, an uncle married his niece, only five years younger, circa 1876. Their descendants, including one grandson who is still alive as well as many members of later generations, are flourishing.

It was also considered proper for first cousins to marry. My best friend as a child was the daughter of two first cousins. 

Judith Singer

Researching CHARNEY and variations in Lithuania and eastern Poland


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

soring0412@...
 

A nephew cannot marry his aunt. According to the Jewish law it is called incest.
An uncle can marry he's niece. It is allowed.
Sorin Goldenberg
Israel


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

Myra Fournier
 

Hi, Jeffrey:

I have a great-aunt who married her uncle in the mid-1800's in Germany. 

He was 10 years older.  

They had six children, two of whom died in infancy.

Several of my friends had similar circumstances with their ancestors, so I think it was an accepted (if not common) practice.

I think you'll get similar responses from others.  

Good luck!

Myra Fournier
Bedford, MA
mjfourn@...


Third Annual Shirley M. Barnes Records Access Award to Jan Meisels Allen #announcements #usa

Phil Goldfarb
 

Congratulations to Jan Meisels Allen, President of the JGS of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County!

At the Society Fair of the New England Regional Genealogical Conference, the Massachusetts Genealogical Council (MGC) awarded its third annual 
Shirley M. Barnes Records Access Award to Jan Meisels Allen, the chair of the Public Records Access Monitoring Committee of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The award is an engraved book clock, a replica of the award presented to Shirley Barnes July 14, 2007, upon her retirement as Civil Records Director of MGC. Read more about Jan as well as the award: Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter - Third Annual Shirley M. Barnes Records Access Award to Jan Meisels Allen (eogn.com) 

Phil Goldfarb
President, JGS of Tulsa
Lead Moderator, JewishGen Discussion Group
phil.goldfarb@... 


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

blockmk@...
 

Well I can speak with experience on this.  My husbands grandfather was Samuel Block from around Kiev, Russia.  I looked for probably 15 yrs before I finally found his passenger list. And I was skeptical about it until I checked with my FIL and confirmed he did indeed have a scar on his forehead.   The ship manifest for him says Schloma Black coming into Philadelphia on the Merion 20th of Feb 1907.  I can not find any records of him as "Black" anywhere. Other convincing info that it was his record was the fact he was going to Mckeesport PA to his BIL M. Goodman.   I thought maybe it was a misspelling or translation error until I found a sibling who also came in as Blach  Along with a women who would eventually become their SIL who travelled with her using Blach as a surname. I found the marriage record and her surname was Neschelman.  I know its Samuel's sister (Riwke) and her eventual SIL(Sure) as they were going to M. Goodman in McKeesport.  Strange thing is that the person listed as the contact in Russia for both girls is the father of Samuel.  His name was Gedalie.  Its the only record I have that shows his name that originated outside the US.  And on that part of the record I'm un able to determine if it is Bloch or Blach.  All this to say that Samuel's name on his passenger list was Schloma and I've seen it a few other times in his early records.  On his stone he is "Shlomo Yitzchak ben Gedayla Halayvi."    Good luck with your search.   I just tend to be very open minded when it comes to spelling of names.   

On another note.   Do you know any of his sibling names or that of his parents.  The Polish records tend to have lots of holes in them.  I've often found more regarding siblings (like births etc) then the person in my direct tree.  What does his gravestone say?

Katherine Block
Canton, GA
blockmk@...


Re: Help Identifying Town Name on Dec of Intention #galicia

lee@...
 

Sheri,
I don't think that it is a town name at all, but rather says "a widower" and is meant to fill in the blank above regarding marriage status, especially since no name is entered for the wife.
Best,
Lee Goodman 
Vermilion, Ohio 

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