Date   

This Sunday, May 23 - JGSNY Zoom Meeting #announcements

Phyllis Rosner
 

Jewish Genealogical Society NY Meeting
Sunday May 23, 2020 at 2 p.m. EDT
Zoom Webinar

Researching US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Records

Speaker: Marian Smith

Marian Smith will present an overview of three historical eras (1820-Present) of US immigration and naturalization records, illustrated with documents of Jewish immigrants. Using a timeline tool (included in the handout), she will demonstrate how plotting an immigrant’s life events can pinpoint which records may exist for that particular immigrant and where these records can be found. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.    

Marian Smith retired in 2018 after thirty years as a historian for the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), later US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). She now speaks to groups on US immigration and nationality records and leads the I&N Records fortnightly study group.


All are welcome; attendance is free, but registration is required:

Click here to register at our website

Submitted by:
Phyllis Rosner jgsny.org
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


Re: Added by hand "MIXTE" on birth and marriage certificate in France #france #general

michele.akerberg@...
 

Hello,
The handwritten mention could mean non-Jewish husband and Jewish wife (mixed couple two different religions).
Indeed, during the 1939-1945 war in France, the religion of the grandparents was, unfortunately, sought after to define the "Jewishness" of the person.
cordially
Michèle AKERBERG
 


Re: Added by hand "MIXTE" on birth and marriage certificate in France #france #general

David Choukroun
 

Dear all,

a "mixte" or a simple "m" tag is not unusual for those records

In 1871, the treaty of Frankfurt ratified the loss of Alsace and Moselle to the new German Empire, which had been proclaimed a few months earlier in the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles.
Alsace and Moselle remained annexed until the end of the Great War. 

My assumption is that this tag is just saying they were not considered with the same nationality at the date this tag was added (probably in 1873 or later). 

but it would be nice to have a confirmation from the Archives of Paris.  Will send a request and let you know

--
Regards,
David CHOUKROUN

david.choukroun@...
FRANCE

CHOUKROUN ATTALI ATLANI


Where can I find Lodz Court records for 1949 #lodz

Michael Wilson
 

I am hoping to find a deposition used in 1949 to convince a Lodz Court to declare a woman's husband to have died in 1946 in Sarny.  This decision was made on 1 July 1949.  Does anyone have experience of searching for Lodz court records?  Where might such records be kept?  Does anyone have possible contact details?  Thanks in anticipation, Mike Wilson


looking for relatives of Constantin aka Costica Caufman #israel #romania

Aline Petzold
 

Another try- I am looking for relatives of my Aunt Sally (aka Sura or Sarah) Sternberg's first husband.  She married Constantin Caufman in Romania probably in the late 1930s.  His parents were Heinrich and Betti Caufman. They may have immigrated to Israel, where my Aunt sally lived before moving to Canada in 1950.  They were divorced in 1951 and she then married her second husband Jean Gruneberg.  I am most interested in  discovering the date of Sally's marriage to Costica.  Thanks for your help.
Aline Petzold
St. Paul MN USA


Re: Was it proper for a nephew to marry his aunt? #general

Steven Usdansky
 

One of my father's uncles married his niece - in Rhode Island in 1918. And one of my grandfather's sisters married her uncle - in NJ. Looking into the latter, it appears my grandfather's sister used her mother's maiden name on the marriage license application.
--
Steven Usdansky
usdanskys@...
USDANSKY (Узданский): Turec, Kapyl, Klyetsk, Nyasvizh, Slutsk, Grosovo
SINIENSKI: Karelichy, Lyubcha, Navahrudak
NAMENWIRTH: Bobowa, Rzepiennik
SIGLER: "Minsk"


Re: Online list of emigrants from Germany - translation #germany

Jessica Skippon
 

 From Google Translate:

 

The emigrant database of the two Rhineland-Palatinate state archives is currently based primarily on the evaluation of sources on emigration to America in the period from 1815 to 1914. Occasional entries beyond this are due to the file duration or file structure. The very different histories of the areas, for the transmission of which the two archives are responsible, leads to differences in the emigration transmission and in the selection of files.

 

Due to the Prussian structure of the administration of the Rhine Province, there is a central record on emigration from the district governments, structured according to destinations (continents or countries), in the Koblenz state archives. Therefore, the focus here is currently on the evaluation of this extensive group of files, the "emigrations to America" ​​for the period mentioned above. In the Speyer State Archives, responsible for the then Bavarian Palatinate and Rheinhessen, there is no homogeneous record of emigration to be found. The corresponding files are often not limited to a specific emigration destination and also contain emigrations to other German territories, which are then also recorded.

 

Only the documents relating to emigration from Bavaria are evaluated, as the “Emigration Proofs” from the Hessian State Archives in Darmstadt are a suitable research tool for legal emigration from the Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt and thus also for Rheinhessen. These can be called up online via the Hessian archive information system (Arcinsys) at: arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys.

 

The inclusion of data in the emigrant database is an ongoing process (56,089 records, as of December 31, 2020) It is therefore also possible that you will not receive any research results for the name or place you are looking for because the relevant files have not yet been evaluated. In these cases, we recommend that you send an inquiry to the responsible archive. Each person is recorded with their own data set. As a rule, surname, first name, date of birth (or age), place of residence, district, date of emigration (application, discharge, passport issue, embarkation) and destination are recorded. In our virtual reading room "Apertus" you can search for emigrants from the area of ​​today's Rhineland-Palatinate and its predecessor territories (e.g. also Wetzlar). There you will also find help texts on using the emigrant database.

Jessica Skippon
BORGER, SCHANZER, BIRN, JACHZEL in Andrychau, Wadowice and Bielsko Biala

 


Re: German Citizenship: Germany, Holocaust #germany #holocaust

Myra Fournier
 

Hi, Peter:

Thanks so much for your offer to search names. 

My parents - both emigrated to U.S.:
Egon Klappholz (born 1912 in Konigshutte)
Irene Schlesinger (born 1921 in Berlin)

My grandmothers - both emigrated to U.S.:
Johanna Klappholz - nee Schlein (born 1887 in Lendzin)
Erna Schlesinger - nee Meyer (born 1897 in Berlin)

My grandfather - emigrated to Holland
Kurt (Curt) Schlesinger (born 1885 in Berlin)

My greatgrandmother - died in Auschwitz:

Jenny Pelz - nee Gruenberg (born 1874 in Schoenlanke)

Again, my thanks.

Myra Fournier
Bedford, MA
mjfourn@...


Re: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #general #poland #names

Dahn Cukier
 

I know a BLATKO, who has relatives in England named BLACK.

Dahn Zukrowicz

When you start to read readin,
how do you know the fellow that
wrote the readin,
wrote the readin right?

Festus Hagen
Long Branch Saloon
Dodge City, Kansas
(Gunsmoke)


On Saturday, May 15, 2021, 4:35:54 PM GMT+3, Larry Gaum <larrygaum@...> wrote:


I suggest Shiah Schwartz or Shmuel Schwartz
Larry Gaum
Toronto, ON.


Re: Added by hand "MIXTE" on birth and marriage certificate in France #france #general

Christine Lassiege
 

Hi 
The archives of paris (civil) were burned and destroyed  in 1871 during the commune. The wedding was in 1850. In 1873 someone asked for the reconstitution of the act and produced documents which I enclose to you. To do so, individuals must provide proof of their birth and wedding. In this case, Rachel Lyon did not have a birth certificate and asked witnesses to certify her identity. I did not see any mention of her religion. It says that she was born in Moselle.
I suppose that "mixte" means that not all evidence are official documentation. if you want to be sure, it is possible to ask the question to the archives of Paris by sending a copy of your document dac.archives@...
Christine Lassiege (France)


Re: 1900 Census #records #usa

Odeda Zlotnick
 

Are you sure it's not AL or Al - "Alien" (i.e. not naturalized)?
--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


Re: Response to query: What would likely be the Jewish name for Samuel Black? #names

Marilyn Robinson
 

"CHARNEY"/"CHERNY" is a last name that translates from Russian as "Black":Чарни.
Samuel (in Russian given name; it's also a surname): Samuil, Samuel, 
Samoil (in Polish)
Therefore, Russian would be: Samuil Charney/Cherny. 
Samuel/Samuil means God heard ( Sh'ma Elohim, in Hebrew or "name of God", Shem Ha Elohim, in Hebrew)
 
 
Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Re: Mendl Vaysman from Zinkov Memorial Book #ukraine

ellenj53@...
 

I was wondering where I could get the Zinkov memorial book or any information about the people of that town. My paternal grandmother was from Zinkov. My grandmother’s maiden name was Mordis. Her father, my great grandfather, Isser Zev Mordis had two wives. Sosa(Sura) Hadachnik and my grandmother’s mother, Mollie Neiman(Genemerman). I have not been able to find any family for Isser Zev Mordis. While doing this research I did just come across a Anna Mordis (Fein), born 1890, but do not know where she fits into my tree. One of Anna’s relatives shares a good amount of DNA with my Aunt. Just trying to find out how to go about finding Issa Zev’s brothers, sisters, and /or parents.

Ellen Jacobs
Livingston, NJ


This Sunday May 23 - JGSNY Zoom Meeting #announcements #jgs-iajgs

Phyllis Rosner
 

Jewish Genealogical Society NY Meeting
Sunday May 23, 2020 at 2 p.m. EDT
Zoom Webinar

Researching US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Records

Speaker: Marian Smith

Marian Smith will present an overview of three historical eras (1820-Present) of US immigration and naturalization records, illustrated with documents of Jewish immigrants. Using a timeline tool (included in the handout), she will demonstrate how plotting an immigrant’s life events can pinpoint which records may exist for that particular immigrant and where these records can be found. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.    

Marian Smith retired in 2018 after thirty years as a historian for the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), later US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). She now speaks to groups on US immigration and nationality records and leads the I&N Records fortnightly study group.


All are welcome; attendance is free, but registration is required:

Click here to register at our website

Submitted by:
Phyllis Rosner jgsny.org
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


Online listl of emigrants from Germany #germany #records

Andreas Schwab
 

The state archives of Rheinland-Pflalz put a list of emigrants from Germany online. The list contains over 50,000 entries, more will be entered later. It contains names, home towns and destination country, sometimes destination city. 
The description of the data base is here (in German):
https://www.landeshauptarchiv.de/bestaende/auswanderdatenbank
The entries can be found in here, sorted alphabetically:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v4161941
I have not found out how to search for entries in the list.
--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


1900 Census #records #usa

Marilyn Feingold
 

On the Philadelphia 1900 Census there is an abbreviation A2 under the naturalization question for my great grandfather. I don’t understand what the A2 means? Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Marilyn Feingold


Re: What does the abbreviation "MZ" or "M3" mean in the Creed column of the 1897 Russian census? #translation #russia #records

Ilya Zeldes
 

Most likely, "М.З." means abbreviation for the "Моисева Закона", meaning "Moses' Law", or Jewish.
 
 
Ilya Zeldes
North Fort Myers, FL

--
Ilya Zeldes
North Fort Myers, FL


Re: Added by hand "MIXTE" on birth and marriage certificate in France #france #general

Nicole Heymans
 

This is not a civil record proper, but a "reconstitution" of civil records destroyed by fire during the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 or maybe the "Commune de Paris" the following year.

I found this link but am not at all an expert on the subject. See article bottom p. 306 - top 307

https://education.persee.fr/doc/baip_1254-0714_1872_num_15_281_39029

The addition of "Mixte" in a very different writing suggests it was added much later - maybe either Dreyfus period or WWII.

Just a couple of suggestions.

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium


Announcing the publication of the Yizkor Book of Rafalovka, Ukraine #yizkorbooks #JewishGenUpdates

Susan Rosin
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project is proud to announce its 125th title:

Memorial book for the towns of:
Old Rafalowka, New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity (Rafalivka,
Ukraine)

This is the English translation of Sefer zikaron le-'ayarot Rafalowka
ha-yeshenah,
Rafalowka he-hadashah, Olizarka, Zoludzk veha-sevivah

Published in Tel Aviv, 1996

Edited by: Pinhas and Malkah Hagin
Project Coordinator: Mark J. Schwartz
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff Hopper
Layout and Name Indexing: Jonathan Wind
Hard Cover, 8.5" by 11", 488 pages with all original illustrations and
photographs.
The book is available from JewishGen for $34

The Jewish settlement in Rafalovka had existed since before the times of the
tyrant Bogdan Chmielnicki, in the mid-1600s. The town was named after the
Polish landowner, whose family name was Rafval, one of the many families of
the Polish aristocracy. Before the destruction of the town in WWII, a
recorded history of the Jewish kehilla (community) of Rafalovka existed,
documenting the lives of many generations in the centuries before the Second
World War.

In the words of the book editors:
The book expresses our grief, sorrow and cry over the loss of our beloved
ones. It is a Kaddish that was never said over the graves of our dear ones.

This Yizkor book contains many first-hand accounts and personal remembrances
of the survivors and immigrants from the town and serves as a fitting
memorial to this destroyed Jewish community and in addition bears witness to
its destruction.

For the researchers, this book contains a wealth of both genealogical and
cultural information that can provide a picture of the environment of our
ancestors.

Consider this book as a gift for a family member or a friend.

For ordering information please see:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Rafalovka.html

For all our publications see: https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html


Susan Rosin
Yizkor Books In Print


Birth Records for Gittel Leurie (Michalowitz): Which Community Were You Born In?? Where Can I Find Birth Records? #records #warsaw

Marilyn Robinson
 

Gittel/Gus/Gertrude LEURIE/LEVINE (aka MICHALOWITZ) was born 7 January, 1891. She was my maternal grandmother. She told me that she was born in Warsaw. (Her brother, Joseph, also said that he was born in Warsaw.)
But, according to a Hamburg passenger list (Furst Bismark), she came with her family (age 6 months) to U.S. (8 Aug. 1891) under the last name of "Michalowitz" & last residence was listed as Lodz.

Additionally, Gus's parents, Rivka/Rebecca REICHMAN & Zalmen/Solomon MICHAELOWITZ (aka LEURIE, or some version of this spelling), according to records, were married in Tomaszow Mazowlecki, Lodzkie, Pol. (1867). But, were buried in Washington Cemetery (Bklyn, NY) in the Piotrikow Trybunalski section.
So, where should I look for my grandmother's birth record?? 

Marilyn Robinson
Florida

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