Date   

Cowen report (was Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port) #general

Family and DNA
 

In fact the link goes here, might be even easier for folks to access:

https://catalog.archives.gov/OpaAPI/media/602984/content/dc-metro/rg-085/559947/Cowen_Report.pdf

Juliana Berland (France)


On 28/05/2021 15:31, Susan&David wrote:
This is the site with the Cowen Report PDF. Scroll down to see it.
https://catalog.archives.gov/id/602984

--
Galicia: BADER, BADIAN, FELDMANN, FREIDENHEIM/FREUDENHEIM, GERTLER, WIENER/WEINER * Germany: ADELSDORFER, BÄR/BAER, EPSTEINN, HAUSSMAN, ISSAK, MEYER, MOSES, ROSENSTEIN * Russia: AMBURG, BENIN/BERLAND, BERKOVICH/BERKOWITZ, EPSTEIN, GELBURD/GOLDBERG/GAYLBURD/GILBERT


Re: Download the Cowan Report #records

Stephen Katz
 

I found an easier way to download the report.
I open the archive.gov page containing the report (https://catalog.archives.gov/id/602984),
Just below the first page of the report and above the "thumbnails" of individual pages, on the left, there is a group of various tools. The first tool of that group is a sliding bar to enlarge or reduce the image. The last tool in that group is a download symbol. Clicking on that download symbol downloads the entire report in pdf format.
Below is what that screen looks like.

Stephen Katz



This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #ukraine

Bruce Drake
 

The stories in most Yizkor book chapters are resurrected from memories of survivors that were written in the years after the Holocaust. But there are also contemporaneous accounts of events that occurred in the form of letters written at the time.

“A Letter from Hell,” from the book of Podhajce in Ukraine, was written by Yehoshua Weiss to his brother in New York. He used the pseudonym Bin-Nun, a biblical reference to Joshua (Yehoshua) the son of Nun.In the letter, he recounts a pogrom that occurred on Yom Kippur. His father, wearing his tallis, was shot in his bed. His mother and other Jews were rounded up and sent to Belzec.

He reserved particular bitterness towards the Judenrat who were seen by many as Nazi collaborator and by others as a necessary evil which permitted Jewish leadership a forum to negotiate for better treatment for those taken captive by the Germans. To Weiss, “The Judenrat was an institution that had a bloodthirsty spirit for Jewish blood.”


--
Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port #ukraine

Susan&David
 

This is the site with the Cowen Report PDF. Scroll down to see it.
https://catalog.archives.gov/id/602984

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 5/28/2021 8:57 AM, Peter MacDonald wrote:
There appear to be two ways to download the whole file.

1. Scroll down the page and just below the document window there is an icon with a down arrow. Click it.
2. Scroll down the page until you see the red icon "PDF."  Click it.

--
Peter J. MacDonald
Kishinev, Bessarabia: FRAYNT, FRANT
Chicago: FRIEND


Re: Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port #ukraine

Peter MacDonald
 

There appear to be two ways to download the whole file.

1. Scroll down the page and just below the document window there is an icon with a down arrow. Click it.
2. Scroll down the page until you see the red icon "PDF."  Click it.

--
Peter J. MacDonald
Kishinev, Bessarabia: FRAYNT, FRANT
Chicago: FRIEND


Re: Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port #ukraine

billie.stein@...
 

Thank you Michele. The Cowen report is fascinating, but much too long to read online in a single sitting. I tried to download it using the export button, but only managed to get a 3 page description of the report. It's also possible to download one page at a time, but I haven't found a way to get the full 193 pages in one pdf.  Has anyone else figured out how to do it?

Billie Stein
Givatayim, Israel


Re: Help locate a birthplace #general #usa #lithuania

Diane Jacobs
 

Have you tried searching Dubinsky phonetically on the All Lithuania Database
for vital records, revision lists etc on Jewishgen?

Diane Jacobs





On May 28, 2021, at 1:57 AM, MarkWeinberg18@... wrote:



I am trying to locate my wife’s grandfather’s birthplace.  Can you help?

 

His name was Dawid Dubinsky, but in America, became David Berkman.  He told me that he was from the Vilna gubernia.  He belonged to the Meretz landsmanshaft in Boston.  The town of Meretz is currently named Merkine in Lithuania.

 

His 1914 Ellis Island manifest says he was from Polanky.  Both his citizenship Declaration of Intention and Petition for Naturalization also say his birthplace was Polanky.  However, his brother’s Declaration of Intention says he was born in Perysok (or perhaps it reads Perysck, the next to last letter is hard to read).  I can locate Merkine, but neither of the other two places.  There is a Polonka in Belarus, but that was not in the Vilna gubernia.  I have searched the JewishGen Communities,  KehilaLinks, and Gazetteer data bases.

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

Mark Weinberg

Wilmington, DE    


--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Birth Records 1907-1908 and 1934 in Israel #israel #records

S R
 

I'm looking for birth records for the years 1907-1908 in Israel (Ottoman Regime) and 1934 (Palestine-British Mandate).

Where can I find them?




--
Shia Rabinowitz


Help locate a birthplace #general #usa #lithuania

MarkWeinberg18@...
 

I am trying to locate my wife’s grandfather’s birthplace.  Can you help?

 

His name was Dawid Dubinsky, but in America, became David Berkman.  He told me that he was from the Vilna gubernia.  He belonged to the Meretz landsmanshaft in Boston.  The town of Meretz is currently named Merkine in Lithuania.

 

His 1914 Ellis Island manifest says he was from Polanky.  Both his citizenship Declaration of Intention and Petition for Naturalization also say his birthplace was Polanky.  However, his brother’s Declaration of Intention says he was born in Perysok (or perhaps it reads Perysck, the next to last letter is hard to read).  I can locate Merkine, but neither of the other two places.  There is a Polonka in Belarus, but that was not in the Vilna gubernia.  I have searched the JewishGen Communities,  KehilaLinks, and Gazetteer data bases.

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

Mark Weinberg

Wilmington, DE    


Re: Travel from Shtetl to Sea Port #general

Terry Ashton
 

I would also recommend reading "Bread to Eat & Clothes to Wear" by Gur
Alroey, which contains letters from Jewish migrants in the early 20th
century and sheds light on the trials and tribulations on leaving Eastern
Europe for America and elsewhere. It is published by Wayne State University
Press.


Ms Terry Ashton, Australia
PRASHKER/SZUMOWSKI/WAJNGOT/WIERZBOWICZ/GOLDMAN/SEGAL-SEGALOVITCH/GOLTZ


Download the Cowan Report #records

Susan&David
 

I downloaded the Cowen Report.
I clicked on Export, then selected PDF
I navigated down lower on the screen a bit and could see the PDF file. 
Clicking on the file opened it to a black screen with a menu bar at the
top where I clicked on the download icon.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 5/26/2021 8:23 PM, Michele Lock wrote:
The other day, a person posted about the Cowen report, written by a US
immigration judge who traveled to Russia in 1906 to investigate
various matters pertaining to the Jewish immigration from there. The
National Archives has the images of each page of the report available
for viewing at: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/602984
<https://catalog.archives.gov/id/602984>


Great Genealogy Resources #israel #records #holocaust #hungary

S R
 


Hello all!

I came across these two websites which contain 40-50 million (!) scanned documents of jewish interest, including vital records, marriage certificates etc.

Hungary - Könyvtár:
https://library.hungaricana.hu/

Israel - Israel State Archives:
https://www.archives.gov.il/

I hope this will be helpful.

--
Shia Rabinowitz


Ancestry's Fold3 Free Access for Memorial Day #announcements #records #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

  

 

 

Fold3 is part of the Ancestry family of companies is offering free access for Memorial Day through May 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. ET to its 550+ million military records extending back to the Revolutionary War.  After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using a paid Ancestry® All-Access or Fold3® membership.

 

Go to https://go.fold3.com/freeaccess

Click on the blue and white circle in the middle of the page that says Free Access to Fold3. No credit card information is requested.For the free access for Memorial Day do not click on the start a 7-day free day trial as that requires your sharing your credit card information. Registration is required with your name and email address.

 

Once you sign in type the name of the military person you are researching in the red search name, topic or keyword box where it says “search”. A new window opens with the records that Fold3 has for the name, key word etc you placed in the search field.


Depending on the type of  record you can save to your computer, print or share.

 

Scroll down the page below the “cards” with different conflicts/wars to the Memorial Day Salute.  Click on the #ISaluteFor and share a story, photo or record of military hero in your famiy using hashtag#ISaluteFor. There are also videos on Facebook to watch inclued. You must be a Facebook member to access the videos.

 

I have no affiliation with Ancestry or Fold3 and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


More than 2000 new records added to the All Odessa Database #ukraine #JewishGenUpdates

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi all,

Birth indexes for 1876 and marriage indexes for 1854 (about 2300 records) were added to the All Odessa database on the Odessa Kehilalinks (https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa).

Ariel Parkansky
Ukraine SIG
Odessa Town Leader


Re: Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port #ukraine

Jx. Gx.
 

Thank you Michele for sharing the link to the Cowen Report.  My grandfather came over in 1906 so this report is like finding a gold mine.

Did anyone else have problems trying to download the report or is it made not to be downloaded?

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona  


Re: Travel from Shtetll to Sea Port #ukraine

Ada Glustein
 

Thank you all, so much, for the informative and helpful responses.  I've been making my way through the Cowen report and am so impressed with all the stories and persons that Cowen engaged with.  It really does give a good picture of the hows and whys of emigration and the extreme difficulties in leaving a shtetl until boarding a ship -- not to mention those difficulties, too. He is talking about 1906, in particular, and I imagine there would be some changes by 1910 - 1913.  I appreciate that there is some mention of people leaving for Canada, as well.  I will try to find out more about prepaid tickets, banks, etc. here.  

Again, many thanks!

Ada Glustein

GLUSTEIN, GLUZSHTEYN, Podolia Gubernia; Uman, Kiev Gubernia
PLETSEL, PLETZEL, Ternovka, Podolia


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish #yiddish #translation

sklairtaylor@...
 

I've posted a handwritten letter in Yiddish for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM93790
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Terry Sklair Taylor


Re: finding record of name changes #names #records

jbonline1111@...
 

The spelling of my mother's surname changed after she was born, as did that of her first name.  The new spelling was standardized, one might say, when my grandfather was naturalized in the 1930s and is used to this day.

My father and his brothers changed their last name without going through the courts in the 1940s.  Because Dad did not report the change to Social Security, he had to get an affidavit from someone who knew him with both names before he could draw on his Social Security retirement, a minor issue.  But his new name was used in all his US Army documents dating back to 1941. 

There is no requirement to have a name "legally" changed as long as it is not used to defraud.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: finding record of name changes #names #records

Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Sheryl,

Most people just started using a different name, whether it be first name and/or surname, and there is no legal paperwork.

Some people did use the naturalization process to change their name, and that would be noted on their nat papers, if they did so.

Some people did go to court and get their name legally changed.

It seems you are saying that you believe the surname the family used in The U.S. is not the surname they used before coming here? 

Are you trying to figure out the original surname?  If so, there are methods to attempt to do this, even if they didn't legally change the name.

Do you know what town they came from originally?

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Re: finding record of name changes #names #records

Robert Hanna
 

It may never have been changed through the courts.  My grandfather's name changed almost every time he (or someone for him) filled out a new document.  I changed my name in 1979 without going through the court system.  I have two social security cards with different names but the same SS number.  My passport and driver's license are under my new name.  It may be a bit harder to do that with all the current security issues, but it was not that difficult in the 20th century or earlier.

Robert Hanna
NYC

Chanan/Hanan/Hanne/Gane (Warsaw); Blumenblat (Sarnaki); Karasik, Thomashow, Cohen (Babruysk); Rubinstein, Bunderoff, Pastilnik, Nemoyten, Diskin (Minsk).

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