Date   

Re: Questions About Given Name and Candle Tax #poland

binyaminkerman@...
 

I would suggest that Nuko might be a version of the Hebrew name Nachum (sometimes Nuchum). There are also related names like Nachman and Menachem. The root of all these names means comfort in Hebrew. If I'm right then the name Nuko was more of a nickname or Polish name but a formal Hebrew name like Nachum would have been used on a gravestone etc.
--
Binyamin Kerman
Baltimore MD

Researching:
KERMAN Pinsk 
SPIELER Lodz, Zloczew, Belchatow
SEGALL, SCHWARTZ Piatra Neamt


Re: looking for birth place of Phillip and Rachel Davis born in Poland . #poland #unitedkingdom #general

Jill Whitehead
 

If any of this family naturalized in the UK, the place of origin would be on the naturalization certificate.   These are available on the Ancestry website for the period 1870 to 1916, I think.  The summaries (without the detail)  can also be found in the pages of the London Gazette for the years concerned.

Jill Whitehead


Re: Researching cremations #general

stephen@...
 

Your question prompted me to look on JOWB for a cousin who requested to be cremated here in Australia 20 years ago,
The Melbourne Chevra Kadisha doesn't specify that he was cremated, but lists him under a generic category "Cremations, Interstate, Overseas and Other".

 

They also list a plot:  Unknown C, Row A, Plot 206, 1. I presume they have an unmarked grave where ashes can be interned.  

 

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia
stephen@...


Re: Szymaki, Poland #poland

Frank Szmulowicz
 

Szymaki is 60 km by road northeast of Bialystok. Szymki is 48 km by road southeast of Bialystok.
Frank Szmulowicz


Re: Researching cremations #general

David Harrison
 

Cremations are quite common amongst my family (all Jewish) and within the congregation within which I worship with services by our Rabbi.  Many ashes have been spread in different places, possibly with no record, others recorded in books of remembrance in civil Cemetry grounds.  But starting with my father in 1952, his ashes are under a rose bush in a rose garden within a Jewish Cemetry in London (close by is another bush with the ashes of another branch of our family), followed by those of my mother and my first wife, the family brass plate shows all those names and dates, it will be modified for me.  They are among several hundreds in that rose garden.  I hope that this might help members to widen their searches beyond the bound of the strict orthodox members of our widespread faith.
David Harrison
Birmingham, England


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Our Jewish Family History Research via groups.jewishgen.org <ourhistory2015=yahoo.com@...>
Sent: 14 June 2021 19:02
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Researching cremations #general
 
Hi all:

Cremation is an option that secular families occasionally choose now-a-days. 
 
 
I know of a couple, who were holocaust survivors. They both requested to be cremated.
I do wonder if cremations of Jews are recorded on sites at all. Most of us would not even know to consider that as a possible reason for not  locating a person in Jewish cemeteries.
That is a potential genealogical brickwall.
 
Has any group member actually experienced this in your own research? Please share how you worked through the research process.
 
Many thanks in advance.
 
Jacquie GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Researching: 
GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA from Warszawa and possibly Zelechow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Re: Help with spelling of a name #names

Reuven Mohr
 

a Jewish first name like Seidel was probably replaced by something neutral like Sam, or similar; I would not include a first name into the search.
the name Stadlen looks related to the Hebrew Shtadlan, so variations might include Stadlan, Shtadlan, Schtadlan, Statlan, Statlen, Stodlen, Stodlan etc.

Reuven Mohr
Israel


Subject: Langner Family of the Stratyn-New York Chassidic Dynasty. #usa

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Chaya, daughter of Ira
Langner who married his first cousin, Sorche, daughter of Ethel (Ethy)
Rachel and R. Yechiel Michel Horodner, ABD Stratyn.

Neil Rosenstein


Finding passenger records France > La. in 1840s or 1850s #france

Ketura Persellin
 

Hi all,

I'm struggling to find the passenger records of an ancestor, Julie/Julia
Cerf, who immigrated from Alsace in the late 1840s or very early 1850s.
I would appreciate any pointers you might have. She almost certainly
came through New Orleans. She settled in Summit, Miss.

Thanks!

Ketura Persellin


Re: looking for birth place of Phillip and Rachel Davis born in Poland . #poland #unitedkingdom #general

crjos
 

Sandys Row Synagogue is still functioning, and probably looks quite similar to how it would have done at the wedding in 1890!

https://sandysrowsynagogue.org/
--
Charles Joseph
London

Researching: Burde, Lusky, Tikochinsky, Rosofsky, Zacuto


Re: Researching cremations #general

Gary Gershfield
 

I can only speak to New York Jews.

I uncovered many Jewish records at Ferncliff Crematory in Westchester County.

There is also Fresh Pond Crematory in Queens, NY.

During the 1940s-1950s, cremations of Jews, comprised mostly of unaffiliated Jews or Reform Jews.

In addition, cremations were  significantly cheaper than burials.

In more recent times, Jewish families have cremated loved ones, but then the ashes, were placed in a gravestone at a Jewish cemetery.

Gary Gershfield

Forest Hills, NY




On Monday, June 14, 2021 Our Jewish Family History Research via groups.jewishgen.org <main@...> wrote:

Hi all:

Cremation is an option that secular families occasionally choose now-a-days. 
 
 
I know of a couple, who were holocaust survivors. They both requested to be cremated.
I do wonder if cremations of Jews are recorded on sites at all. Most of us would not even know to consider that as a possible reason for not  locating a person in Jewish cemeteries.
That is a potential genealogical brickwall.
 
Has any group member actually experienced this in your own research? Please share how you worked through the research process.
 
Many thanks in advance.
 
Jacquie GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Researching: 
GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA from Warszawa and possibly Zelechow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


The June Issue of the Galitzianer #galicia

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

We are thrilled to announce the release of the June 2021 issue of
the Galitzianer, Gesher Galicia’s quarterly research journal. This
issue begins with some exciting news: a recap of the results of the
recently completed Przemyśl Identification Project, which uncovered
new information on vital records that could be a boon to researchers.

Among the other diverse topics covered in this issue are Jewish
marriages and child legitimacy, Jewish book traders, cadastral map
legends, cousins’ clubs, and a WWI abduction. There’s also an article
by East West Street author Philippe Sands about a son’s efforts to
come to terms with his parents’ Nazi past.

Here is a full list of the articles in this issue:
  • Research Corner: The Przemyśl Identification Project by Tony Kahane
  • Jewish Marriages Revisited by Andrew Zalewski
  • Jewish Book Traders and the Ossolineum by Dorota Sidorowicz-Mulak
  • Map Corner: Cadastral Map Legends by Jay Osborn
  • Tragedy on WWI’s Eastern Front by Sharon Taylor
  • In Their Own Words: A Paper Trail into a Couple’s Nazi Past by Philippe Sands
  • Presidents’ Page: Cousins’ Clubs by Steven S. Turner
The Galitzianer is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia. To join,
visit our website at www.geshergalicia.org/membership/. Members and
nonmembers alike are invited to submit articles on Galicia-related
themes to the Galitzianer. For details, please review our
submissions policy at www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/#submissions
and contact me at submissions@....



Jodi G. Benjamin
Editor, The Galitzianer
Gesher Galicia
 
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PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to submissions@....  
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Virus-free. www.avast.com


JewishGen Education announces New Classes #general #announcements #education

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education announces New Classes

The Learning Center is open for view and registration for Summer/Fall Classes

https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

 

The Learning Center has a new website Genealogy for Gen X, Y and Z 

https://www.jewishgen.org/education/edu-youth.html

 

Take a Look

It’s Beta and it’s Free!--

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


looking for Lazaro Specter #latinamerica #records #russia

Maia Aisi
 

Hi!
I am looking for Lazaro Spector born in Russia en 1888, son of Jacob, dead in Argentina en 1928.
Any information about his family is of great help.
Thanks a lot!
Maia Aisi
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Re: Szymaki, Poland #poland

Hap Ponedel
 

Bob,

Alexander is not wrong about the spelling. Remember that spellings varied quite a bit. I did not see the community listed in the results page with the JG gazetteer, but found the place here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/53%C2%B020'06.0%22N+25%C2%B046'58.4%22E/@52.9660003,23.8260943,12.5z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d53.335!4d25.7829
spelled the way Alexander suggested.

I think this is your community in this screenshot of an 1884 map also. Note the red arrow pointing to the spot. The blue pins are communities found in the JG communities data base. Here is a link to this map on-line: http://easteurotopo.org/leaflet-maps/pale-of-settlement.html#10/52.9301/23.9605. Look for Schimki in the middle of the screen. The fact that it made it on this old map says to me that it used to be a well know place, whereas the modern map seems to indicate that it is insignificant today. This change happened to a lot of communities. It could well have been a place with at least a minyan of Jews in the 19th century but for lack of good data we can't prove it.



I hope this helps.
Hap Ponedel
Eugene, OR
http://easteurotopo.org/

I


JGS of Illinois members to share discoveries and research tips virtually on June 27, 2021 #jgs-iajgs #announcements

Martin Fischer
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois will hold a virtual “Kvell and Tell” session on Sunday, June 27, 2021, as part of the group’s annual meeting. Several JGSI members will take turns sharing family history discoveries and research tips. This meeting, which starts at 2 p.m. CDT (U.S. and Canada), also features a brief annual report from JGSI’s president, Debbie Kroopkin. (A separate JGSI members-only genealogy question-and-answer discussion time will start at 1 p.m.)

To register for this free event, go to https://jgsi.org/Events-calendar. After you register, you will be sent a link to join the meeting. This webinar will be recorded so that JGSI’s paid members who are unable to view it live will be able to view the recording later.

The varied, entertaining, and informative short “Kvell and Tell” talk topics relate to Jewish genealogy or family history research methods, anecdotes, or discoveries.

For more information, see https://jgsi.org or phone 312-666-0100.

JGSI is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping members collect, preserve, and perpetuate the records and history of their ancestors. The group is a resource for the worldwide Jewish community to research their Chicago-area roots. The JGSI motto is “Members Helping Members Since 1981.” The group has more than 300 members and is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.

JGSI's paid members have access to useful and informative online family history research resources, including a members’ forum, more than 65 video recordings of past speakers’ presentations, monthly JGSI E-News, quarterly Morasha JGSI newsletter, and much more.

Members as well as non-members are invited to look for their ancestors on the free searchable JGSI Jewish Chicago Database.


--
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

JGSI website: https://jgsi.org


Researching cremations #general

Our Jewish Family History Research
 

Hi all:

Cremation is an option that secular families occasionally choose now-a-days. 
 
 
I know of a couple, who were holocaust survivors. They both requested to be cremated.
I do wonder if cremations of Jews are recorded on sites at all. Most of us would not even know to consider that as a possible reason for not  locating a person in Jewish cemeteries.
That is a potential genealogical brickwall.
 
Has any group member actually experienced this in your own research? Please share how you worked through the research process.
 
Many thanks in advance.
 
Jacquie GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Researching: 
GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA from Warszawa and possibly Zelechow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Re: Russian Town Of Kostopol #russia

Janet Furba
 

Rovno region of Ukraina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kostopil
Janet Furba,
Germany


Help with spelling of a name #names

Toby Ellis
 

Researching Seidel Stadlen: I am looking for a Seidel Stadlen who lived in Lynn, MA. In 1907.  The only reference I found was on a ship’s manifest as a contact person for a cousin. Besides the 3 major databases, the Mass State Archives, NARA, and the MA Supreme Judicial Court Archives.  I have looked at the obvious possibilities, but with no luck.  His last name is probably written as some variation that I am not aware of.  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.   

 Toby Ellis

 


Re: Possible Hidden Jewish Roots/Surname Change Found #canada #names

K H
 

I recently found a family document; a Registration of Birth for one of my uncles (born: May 2, 1928) from the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada. There is a remark on the bottom of the paper that tells that on May 16, 1956, the surnames were corrected for both the father and child (son). The original surname was (Fichki). The new last name was written as (Nagy). The mother's last name is shown as (Nagy) but I was once told that her Maiden name and married name were the same. Both parents were born in Austria. I researched the last name (Fichki) but did not have much luck only that it may be a revised version of an original spelling and that it may be of Jewish origin. Does anyone have information about the origin of this last name? 

Kim Hann
 

 


Re: Questions About Given Name and Candle Tax #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Hi Susan:

I cannot answer your question about the given name Nuko, but I can respond to your query on the Siemiatycze Candle tax. However, a search of the JRI-Poland database for Nuko results in only two matching index entry - the one you found and one other.

JRI-Poland knows the the Jewish vital records for Siemiatycze have not survived. We found out that the only record set for Siemiatycze at the Archive in Bialystok was this 1861 Candle Tax list. It does appear that the town administration or the town Kahal (Jewish community) institujted this tax on individual Jewish heads of households. This list was transcribed for JRI-Poland and includes 501 names of heads of household with their father's name and their profession.

Your result was a search of the JRI-Poland database for the surname KADYSZEWICZ or some phonetic or soundex variance of that same surname.  Please note that a search for town = Siemiatycze will not return the list of 501 heads of household. This list can only be searched by surname, given name, or other search parameters. 

Best wishes on your search.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Bialystok Area Coordinator

 

On 2021-06-14 12:34 pm, S Pasquariella wrote:

Hello,
I found a listing in JRI-Poland for a possible relative in Siemiatycze.  His name was Nuko Kadyszewicz and he was the only listing under the category of Candle Tax 1861.  My questions:  Is Nuko a Hebrew name and what is it’s meaning. Also, my understanding is that the Candle Tax was imposed on the entire Jewish Community so why was there only one listing in that category?
Thank you,
Susan Kingsley Pasquariella
Researching: Kadyszewicz

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