Date   

Re: What is this Hebrew name? #names

Peter Cohen
 

This illustrates the sad fact that the monuments are often engraved by people who do not know the Hebrew alphabet and simply use templates to engrave something that they do not understand.
--
Peter Cohen
California


Confirm a name#names

hsalmenson@...
 

When I look at my grandfathers family tree, it appears that when born he was named Levi Itzchak Zalmanson. In the all Lithuania revision list it it is given as Leyvik Zalmanson (assuming) I have the correct person. Is that an accept format.

I know that Srol is used for Israel, is Srul also considered the same.

Thanks.

Herman Salmenson


Finding a PDF version of Heppner/Herzberg 1914 book on Posen #germany

AJ <the_ravaj@...>
 

Might anyone be able to direct me towards a downloadable pdf of the Heppner/Herzberg book "Aus Vergangenheit und Gegenwart der Juden in Posen; nach gedrucken und ungedruckten Quellen" from 1914? I already have the link https://www.wbc.poznan.pl/dlibra/show-content/publication/edition/14837?id=14837, but it keeps crashing my computer. And I cannot use the .djvu files because my computer can't read them (even though I have downloaded the correct app).

So if there is a link, & it is shareable. I would be most grateful for the information.

Chag sameach
AJ Friedlander
Modena, Italy

researching FRIEDLANDER-LEHWESS-SILVERSTEIN-JACOBI families in Posen
HOSCHANDER-HERSCHANDER-WERTHEIM-WERTHEIMER families
PHILIPP family of Recklinghausen




you are cordially invited over to my blog http://ravaj.blogspot.com


Re: What is this Hebrew name? #names

Irwin Keller
 

Hi Steven,

Alas, I've seen this a number of times in Jewish cemeteries (including just yesterday). The engraver used a tzade instead of an ayin. They look similar to a non-Hebrew speaker. And the family approved it, not realizing it was wrong. The name should be nun-ayin-chaf-ayin: Neche. Neche bat Natan. 

It's a shame; the error will live into perpetuity! But at least you know what to call her!

Shabbat Shalom

Irwin Keller
Penngrove, CA


Re: Tuberculosis Sanitoria #usa #general

Emily Rosenberg
 

you can go to ronarons.com to search his database of Jewish inmates of Sing Sing. I think he also had a book about tracing relatives who have been in various kinds of public institutions. 
--
Emily Rosenberg
Oakland, California

KESNER in Amsterdam, London, Chicago
STODEL in Amsterdam, London, USA
KAWIN in Suwalki and Poland
RUBINSKY in Suwalki and Poland


Re: What is this Hebrew name? #names

Shimona Kushner
 

Dear Steven:  There is an obvious error in the headstone.  There is no Hebrew name with those letters.  The letters as written are "nun", "tzadi", "kaf", "tzadi".  The word you wrote would mean that the second and last letters are "ayins".  However, if you look at the last line on the headstone where it has the abbreviation for "Tehi nishmata netzura betzror hahayim" (may her soul be bound up in the binds of life), the third letter in Hebrew is a "tzadi" which is exactly like what is given in your great aunt's name.  If it would be Neche as you wrote it would not be Hebrew but Yiddish and those two letters would be an "ayin".  Still doesn't sound like any name I am familiar with. Hope this helps.

Shimona Yaroslavsky Kushner, Haifa, Israel


Re: JEWS IN HIDING IN NICE DURING WW2 #france #holocaust

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

If you can read french, you should take a look at Serge Klarsfeld book (1993) on the roundup of foreign Jews in Nice. The book is online at 

https://klarsfeld-ffdjf.org/publications/livres/1993-LA-RAFLE-DES-JUIFS-A-NICE/mobile/ 

Jean-Pierre Stroweis, Jerusalem

https://stevemorse.org/france 


Map - Street Address - Pre-WWII Kalisz #poland #general

Terry Ashton
 

I am having trouble “finding” the Polish Wikipedia, so could someone please suggest how one logs onto it?

Many thanks

Terry Ashton

 

Ms Terry Ashton, Australia

PRASHKER-Kalisz; SZUMOWSKI-Lomza; WAJNGOT-Poland; WIERZBOWICZ-Poland; GOLDMAN-Poland; SEGAL-SEGALOVITCH-Vilna; GOLTZ-Latvia

 


Re: Tuberculosis Sanitoria #usa #general

Michele Lock
 

The facebook group 'New York City Genealogy' is a good place to ask this sort of question - they know about some of the more obscure places to look for records for NYC residents. They also know what sort of medical records are available for public viewing, or how to go about inquiring about records. The same for arrest/prison/court records.

I would also check to see if there are phone/city directory entries for the grandfather you are looking for, and also look for any other type of record, like voting records (I've found these on Ancestry for a relative who lived in the Bronx in the 1920s) that might place him somewhere in the 1940s. 
--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


Re: Tuberculosis Sanitoria #usa #general

Ben Kempner
 

Hello Jill,

My great-uncle was living in New York and contracted tuberculosis in 1917.  He was accepted by the Jewish Consumptives Relief Society (JCRS), a sanitorium, near Denver, Colorado.  The archives for the JCRS are held by the University of Denver.  Colorado was a common destination for tuberculosis patients.  I believe the JCRS was in operation from 1904 - 1940.  It doesn't sound like an overlap for your grandfather, but it's easy to check their online database of patients at https://jcrs.library.du.edu/jcrs/#/dashboard/advancedSearch.

If you get lucky and find him in the University of Denver archives, let me know and I'll send you the name and email address of the archivist who sent me a 6 page file on my great-uncle.

As far as prisons go, the only thought that comes to mind is a presentation that I heard at our local JGS, given by Ron Arons.  He spoke about his relative who spent time in Sing Sing.  Perhaps contacting Ron might move you closer to some answers.  He comes up readily in Google.  

Good luck.
Ben Kempner
benjamin.kempner@...


Orange County California JGS Sunday Meeting at 10:00 am Pacific Time #announcements #jgs-iajgs

Michelle Sandler
 

The next Orange County California JGS meeting is this Sunday at 10:00
am Pacific Time. The speaker is Greg Nelson of the Family History
Library in Salt Lake City. He will speak on Procuring Eastern
European records for the Family History Library. Members are free and
everyone else is $5 payable on our website at www.ocjgs.org. Everyone
needs to register at our website.

September 19 at 10:00 AM (Pacific time zone)
Greg Nelson: Procuring Eastern European records for the Family History Library
FamilySearch microfilm and digital cameras have been filming
continuously in Central and Eastern Europe since their initial
agreement with Hungary in 1959. Since then, all but 3 countries in
East Europe have had camera–capture projects to capture images of
records that assist genealogists from around the world. Today there
are nearly 30 digital cameras preserving records in archives in the
area. These projects include a large number of Jewish records,
especially those found in archives in the area of the Pale of
Settlement. This presentation will give you an idea of where records
have been digitized, what records have been digitized, how to access
the records and indexes, and where FamilySearch and our partners are
strategically planning to capture additional records in the next 10
years. It will also show you tips and tricks on FamilySearch on how
best to access the images and searchable records as well as add your
own information to the family tree.

Greg Nelson is the Content Strategy specialist for East Europe,
Central Asia, the Middle East, and various US States at FamilySearch.
He holds a BA in Russian, MA in Slavic Linguistics and Literature, and
a BS in Computer Science. He resides in Stansbury Park, Utah.

Register in advance for the virtual meeting by clicking this link:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIuc--rqDMuHtVrLkDN7NFIK0DHtmPN7s65

Michelle Sandler MLS
Westminster, California
Vice President of Programming
President
Librarian OCJGS


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

Dan Nussbaum
 

Yetta is Yiddish and short for Yentl which in turn is a German/Yiddish translation of  Gentle or noble as in Gentleman with the "G" becoming a "Y."

A Hebrew name would be אדירה.

Daniel Nussbaum II, M.D., FAAP
Retired Developmental Pediatrician
Rochester, New York
yekkey@...
 
Tone can be misinterpreted in email. Please read my words with warmth, kindness, and good intentions.

Searching for;
Nussbaum, Katzenstein, Mannheimer and Goldschmidt; Rhina, Raboldshausen and Bad Hersfeld, Germany
Teplitzky, Bendersky and Kaszkiet; Uman, Ukraine
Rosenthal and S(c)henk(el)man; Zinkov, Ukraine
Bild and Kashlevsky; anywhere


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Women in Europe often didn't have Hebrew names, just Yiddish and / or secular ones. Furthermore, names weren't translated, but usually a new name in another language had the same initial sound.

So if you want a Hebrew name for Yetta, I have to ask whether you want an Israeli Hebrew name, or a likely name in Hebrew. My grandmother was Matilda, Aunt Tilly to those who knew her, was born in NYC as Rosa. She didn't translate her name, to Hebrew or English, she chose what was a fashionable, and apparently one she liked.

So looking for a translation of Yetta, which might actually have bee Etta in Eastern Europe, is difficult and, perhaps, pointless.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Re: Stateless in Czechoslovakia #austria-czech #usa

Sherri Bobish
 

Mark,

If your gf naturalized in 1927 than your gm did not automatically become a U.S. citizen.  Even if they had both been living in The U.S. at that time, she would have to apply for citizenship separately.  If he naturalized prior to 1922 it would have been different.

Of course,  the Czech government may or may not have known about the change in U.S. naturalization law, or just may not have cared.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish

Searching: RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala / Ragola, Lith.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne / Istryker, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
LEFFENFELD / LEFENFELD / FINK, KALTER (Daliowa/ Posada Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BERGER (Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
SOKALSKY / SOLON / SOLAN / FINGER(MAN) (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / APPEL (Odessa?)


Re: Tuberculosis Sanitoria #usa #general

Sherri Bobish
 

Jill,

This page may be helpful.  TB hospitals are included.  There are many TB hospitals listed on this page.
http://bklyn-genealogy-info.stevemorse.org/Directory/1935.Hosp.NYState.html
HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK STATE

1935-1936 MEDICAL DIRECTORY OF NEW YORK
Also, if you think he may have been arrested and in prison than here are a few research options:

Find his death certificate.  If he did have TB in the past than that info may be noted on his death certificate.

Search his name in old digitized newspapers at:
https://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html
An arrest and/or conviction may have been noted in a newspaper.

Have you found him on the 1940 census, which you can search at: www.familysearch.org

The 1950 census will be released in April of 2022, so finding him on the 1950 census may reveal more clues.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish

Searching: RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala / Ragola, Lith.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne / Istryker, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
LEFFENFELD / LEFENFELD / FINK, KALTER (Daliowa/ Posada Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BERGER (Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
SOKALSKY / SOLON / SOLAN / FINGER(MAN) (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / APPEL (Odessa?)


Re: Stateless in Czechoslovakia #austria-czech #usa

Andreas Schwab
 

Destroying your passport does not cancel your citizenship. Rather, according to the decree of 25 Nov. 1941, German Jews lost their German citizenship when living or moving abroad. 
--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

Sherri Bobish
 

Andrea,

There is no way to guess about her original name.  I can tell you that my ggm Yenta was called Yetta after coming to The U.S.  A hundred other ladies that called themselves Yetta may have had other names.

Your gm's Hebrew name may be on her tombstone.

Also, if she was born outside of The U.S. than her passenger manifest will list her under the name she used prior to arriving here.

Good luck,

Sherri Bobish

Searching: RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala / Ragola, Lith.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne / Istryker, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
LEFFENFELD / LEFENFELD / FINK, KALTER (Daliowa/ Posada Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BERGER (Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
SOKALSKY / SOLON / SOLAN / FINGER(MAN) (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / APPEL (Odessa?)


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

jsheines@...
 

Ellen, be careful with the use of Ita if you live along the Mexican border.  Ita is a common Spanish nickname,
--
Herschel Sheiness
San Antonio, Tx
jsheines@...


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

fredelfruhman
 

To add more possibilities to this growing list:

My German-Jewish mother's secular name was Jettchen (pronounced Yettchen), a diminutive of the nickname for Henrietta.  (I won't go into what her "Hebrew" name was, as this would only add confusion). 

However, no-one called her Jettchen; they used one of two other nicknames:  Hette and Hetti.

I always thought that a nice Hebrew name to go with these would be Hadassah.
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


Re: The Hebrew translation for the name Yetta #names

Dick Plotz <Dick@...>
 

Jeffrey's reply illustrates a fact that we all need to keep in mind
with questions like Andrea's. Two related ones, in fact.

1. With the exception of common, well-known Biblical names such as
Sarah or Jacob, names do not translate, in the sense that when people
move from one country to another, especially when it involves crossing
an ocean, they often change their name, not only to the counterpart of
their original given name, e.g., Ya'akov to Jacob, but often to an
entirely different name. It's often been noted in JewishGen
discussions that men with a wide variety of names in Europe, not only
names beginning with S, became "Sam" in America. This has jokingly
been called "Samification."

2. Especially in cities, Jews' civil given names often did not
correspond in any predictable way to their ritual names. I'm a good
example of this; my Hebrew name is Yitzchak Yisrael, as is that of my
cousin Paul Plotz. We were both named after our grandfather Ike. Yes,
alliterative naming is common, but far from universal.

So attempts to deduce ritual names from civil names or vice versa,
ditto European names vs American names, are misguided at best. Even
when a civil name is Biblical in origin, it's not necessarily the
person's name by which they were called to the Torah or that appears
in Hebrew lettering on their gravestone. Think about it from the point
of view of how a person gets their given name or names. Typically,
their parents announce their name on a civil document and at a bris or
naming ceremony. Anyone who has cared for a newborn knows that it's
usually a hectic time, and making everything match up neatly is not
high on their list of priorities.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


On Fri, Sep 17, 2021 at 1:57 PM Jx. Gx. <mrme1914@...> wrote:

Hello Andrea, My great-grandmother's name was Heneh Yuteh, but somewhere along the line she started using the name Yetta Chana and even more often just Yetta. My mother was name in honor of Yetta with the Hebrew name Yehudit, which in English became Judith. Incidentally, my mother had a strong bond with Yetta and often in later life referred to her as "Yitta" which seems to have a warmer tone to the name, at least to my ears.

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona

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