Date   

Translation request for marriage record Rocha Jankielowna Mejranowska, 1829 #translation

Erika Gottfried
 

Translation requested for marriage record for Rocha Mejranoska, dated 1829, from Wizany, Suwalki Gubernia (Russian Empire).
 
I’ve just now been able to obtain from the FHL scans of several original vital records relating to persons surnamed (variations of) Maranofsky/Maranowski/Mejranowski/a, etc., of which this is one.
 
I would be very grateful to anyone who would translate any of of these documents, which are either in Polish or Lithuanian, I believe (not certain), some with notations in Yiddish or Hebrew. 
 
Many thanks in advance, Genner friends!
 
 
Erika Gottfried--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Looking for descendants of Chaya Rabinovitch (nee Vainstein) who submitted Yad Vashem Testimonial Pages on 1991 from Kiriat Motzkin, Israel #israel

Avraham Y. Kahana
 

Hi all,
I would be grateful if anyone can help in putting me in contact with descendants of one Chaya Rabinovitch (nee Vainstein, according to her Yad Vashem testimonials) who submitted testimonials to Yad Vashem on 1991 from the following address:
Kiryat Motzkin, HaHashmonaim street, 44/2, Israel

My grandmother's maternal family was Koifman, to which one of her Vainstein brothers married.

Thank you in advance,
Avraham Y. Kahana
Israel


Re: Translation of Cause of Death in Galician Polish Language Record #galicia #translation

Ines Klein
 

I read "zamordowany przez szizal" what means strangled with a rope (Sisal). Szizal is a scarf.

Ines Klein


Re: Szatmar, Hungary #hungary

Avi Markovitz
 

Hi,
I'm familiar with George Elefant's website and database, I actually contacted him to ask him about the sources prior to my visit to Szatmar in 2020. He actually did a great job putting all that data together.
The only problem with the database is that it was not updated with new records since 2010.
So if you were lucky enough to find some of your ancestor's records that's great, but it will not ever update with new records.
--
My regards
Avi Markovits
avi.markovitz@...
_______________
Interested in: Markovits, Garay, Ehrenreich, Lubeck, Weisz, Herskovits
Hadad (hodod), Bajmok, Sopron, Alsoberekszo, Szatmat, Nagyvarad, Nagyszentmiklós (Sânnicolau Mare)
 


Re: Looking for a town #russia

Linda Cantor
 

Actually the town is more likely Joniskis in modern-day Lithuania.  In Yiddish it sounded like Yaneshik.

Linda Cantor
New York City


Re: Looking for a town #russia

Michele Lock
 

If you are sure it is a town in the Russian Empire, Yanishik is likely Yanishok, the Yiddish name for the town now known as Joniskis, in the Siauliai district of  northern Lithuania. Other names you can find on old records for the town are Yanisky or Janizky. 

You can look for records on Jewishgen, to see if you find your family there (look in Lithuania, in the Siauliai uyezd of Kovna gubernia). Also, US records like ship passenger lists and naturalization records would likely have the town of origin.
--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Rabinowitz in Papile, Lithuania and Riga, Latvia
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


Re: Vienna Austria Opens First Public Memorial Listing Holocaust Victims' Names #announcements #austria-czech #holocaust #names

Stephen Katz
 

For those planning to visit Vienna, the memorial is located in the Ostarrichipark, a green area in front of the Austrian national bank. It is in Vienna's ninth district (near, incidentally,  where I used to live).
This is the second memorial in Vienna to Holocaust victims. The other one, a rather austere structure, is located in the Judenplatz in Vienna's first district. The prime mover behind the new monument, Kurt Yakov Tutter, himself a Shoah survivor, who worked tirelessly for 20 years to bring it to realization, considered the monument in the Judenplatz to be "much too abstract," as it contained no names of victims. He wanted a place where people, like himself, could mourn relatives who had been murdered and for whom there are no graves to visit.
Stephen Katz


Today's webinar on Jews in the US Military and recording of Myths of Jewish Genealogy #education #JewishGenUpdates

Avraham Groll
 

Dear Friends,

Just a short note from the education team:

(1) Today's free JewishGen Talk webinar will take place at 2PM Eastern Time. The topic is Researching Jews in the US MilitaryPlease join us and click here to register now!
(2) A recording of our recent JewishGen Talks webinar The Three Great Myths of Jewish Genealogy is now available by clicking here.
(3) Our next webinar will take place on Nov. 17 focusing on Methods of Researching Jewish Names and Towns. Please stay tuned for registration information.

Avraham Groll
Executive Director
JewishGen.org

PS. If you are in a position to do so, please consider contributing to our Fall Appeal. A gift of any amount will make a real difference, and can be made in honor/memory of family and friends. Membership gifts of $100+ qualify for premium features. All gifts directly help support our mission of preserving our Jewish family history and heritage for future generations.


Re: Szatmar, Hungary #hungary

Theo Rafael
 

Barbara,

These are two unrelated places, some 30 miles/ 45 km away from each other. Names in the area are very confusing because of multiple languages and changes over time.
Szatmar in Yiddish stands for Szatmarnemeti in Hungarian (see map) and was the main town in the county of Szatmar. Nowadays it's called Satu mare in Romanian and it lies on the river Somes.

What is called nowadays Szatmarcseke used to be called Cseke until the 20th century (see map), a small village in the county of Szatmar, on the river Tisza.
See the old Szatmar county map here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szatm%C3%A1r_County.

If you're researching ancestors from the town of Szatmar, it's nowadays Satu Mare then. No relationship to the much smaller village of Cseke (whch happens to be called more recently Szatmarcseke) nor to the small town of Fehérgyarmat near the latter.

Best,
Theo Rafael


Yiddish names #names

Susan Kobren
 

There are often many questions about Yiddish/Hebrew names. This is a link to National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene.  There is a series of lessons to teach Yiddish by Motl Didner. This lesson is Season 3 episode 6, What’s in a (Yiddish) Name? You will find some Yiddish lessons interspersed but he does an excellent job of teaching about Yiddish names. https://nytf.org/live/?mc_cid=053d5f9236&mc_eid=3b34bd0448
Enjoy
Susan Kobren

GLAZAMITSKY, NINBURG, KISSEN, SMULOWITZ, DRESKIN Nevel, Russia
SCHWARTZ, SOFER, CHREIN (Volochysk, Volhynia, Ukraine)
KOBRENSKY (Zvenigorodka, Kiev, Ukraine)  


Re: Finding family born Russian Poland #records #unitedkingdom

Emily Rosenberg
 

Think about name variations too. My Lasurus from Suwalki Russian Poland was also listed as Leyzer and Lazarus. 
--
Emily Rosenberg
Oakland, California

KESNER in Amsterdam, London, Chicago
STODEL in Amsterdam, London, USA
KAWIN in Suwalki and Poland
RUBINSKY in Suwalki and Poland


Re: Finding family born Russian Poland #records #unitedkingdom

Emily Rosenberg
 

There used to be a wonderful printed magazine called The Landsman about Sulwalki Jewish people. I have a good collection of them and might be able to do a name search for you. 
--
Emily Rosenberg
Oakland, California

KESNER in Amsterdam, London, Chicago
STODEL in Amsterdam, London, USA
KAWIN in Suwalki and Poland
RUBINSKY in Suwalki and Poland


Re: Vienna Austria Opens First Public Memorial Listing Holocaust Victims' Names #announcements #austria-czech #holocaust #names

Andreas Schwab
 

Yes, here is the link: https://www.doew.at/personensuche
--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


Re: Vienna Austria Opens First Public Memorial Listing Holocaust Victims' Names #announcements #austria-czech #holocaust #names

June F Entman (jfentman)
 

Is it possible to search online for names on the wall?
June F. Entman
St. Augustine, FL


Re: Looking for a town #russia

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Janeček is now in Slovakia.  In 1893, most of Eastern Europe was Russia, Austria or Prussia, and this town was in the Russian Empire. The problem you had is that you used the Jewish Communities Database, which finds major Jewish centers, but many Jews lived in smaller towns with only a few Jews. Jewishgen has a Gazetteer also, but they try to point you away from it. The Gazetteer will find the big Jewish communities also, but 'clutter' most searches with many tiny towns; I always use the Gazetteer.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

"According to information given to me by my mother, my grandfather was born in the town of Yaneshik in the Russian Empire on 07/15/1893. I cannot find the town in the town finder. Is there an alternate name for the town."


Re: Help needed to interpret details in Offenbach Jüdische Einwohnermeldekartei #germany

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

Hi Sohail,

Landau (Hessen) rather than Landau (Bayern) also seems very
plausible.
Sorry, but I do not confirm with this.

At 1912/1913 Landau (Bad Arolsen was not a part of Hessen,
but part of Waldeck-Pyrmont. Also Wiesbaden was part of
Nassau, not of Hessen. Landau (Pfalz) was well known at
Offenbach, whereas Landau (Bad Arolsen) would have an
addition to its name.

To get sure, you may ask the city government about the
"Melderegister".

Ernst-Peter (Winter)



However, I cannot find any record of a barracks
(Kaserne) there at the beginning of the 20th Century. So
perhaps he went there for a different reason, as suggested
by Ernst-Peter. He was a butcher (Metzger) so not sure that
he would have gone there for education/ professional
development, but maybe for work?

With regard to the '1.8.1914' entry on the card, the dark
line does seem significant and it is also a significant
date. I wonder if it indicates that his father lived at that
address on his own after mobilisation. But curiously that
date is 'out of sequence' and is written in the upper part
of the space available, as if it was anticipated that
another date would be written below.

Thank you again for your thoughts
Sohail Husain


Re: Help needed to interpret details in Offenbach Jüdische Einwohnermeldekartei #germany

sohail.husain@...
 

Hi Ernst-Peter

Thank you for such a detailed and helpful response. As I have writtten to Ines, I also had wondered if the two dates mught be the date of the entry and the date on which the event occured. Three of us have had the same idea, so I am beginning to feel that this is the answer.

Your suggestion that he went to WIesbaden and Landau for education is certainly a possibility. But he was a butcher (as was his father and grandfather) and the family was poor. So education seems less likely. I wonder if he might have gone to one or both those places for work. But, as far as Wiesbaden is concerned, his stay there begins in October 1913 and continues until November 1916, mid-way through the war. Maybe he signed on for extra military service and was then attached to Fusilier Reiment 80, which was based in Wiesbaden. But then the card entry would not be 'o/P'. I find that all difficult to explain!

Fantastic that you have a possible deciphering of 'o/P'! I have struggled with this for many months and your suggestion would fit well. I will investigate further when I am next in Offenbach and try to see if it can be confirmed by looking on other cards.

I was aware from the Verlustlisten that Friedrich was wounded in October 1914. I also have information from the Lazarettbuch in the Bundesarchiv that he was discharged five weeks later, declared fit for duty and was sent to a replacement battallion as a Reservist ('Abgang am: 11.11.1914 nach: dienstfähig zum Ersatz-Bataillon'). The next information i have comes from 11 letters that he wrote between April 1915 and January 1916. By then he was then in Infanterie Regiment 87, 6 Kompanie and serving in France. But after January 1916 I have nothing, except that the Meldekartei shows his return from Wiesbaden in November 1916. He may have been wounded again, but his name does not appear again in the Verlustlisten, So what happened to him then is still a big unknown.

Thank you once more for your great suggestions. I am very grateful and would welcome any further ideas you may have.

Regards
Sohail Husain


Re: Finding family born Russian Poland #records #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

For UK, use the UK censuses - e.g. 1871 - which are on Findmypast and Ancestry. 

If your ancestor naturalised, Ancestry has naturalisations for 1870 to 1916 under Travel and Migration. These give the shtetl of origin in most cases. 

There are also specific databases like the Leeds Jews database online, and various cemetery databases (e.g. UK wide or Scotland wide).

If your ancestor was around in 1871 they may have come from the Suwalki Lomza gubernias in NE Poland (near the Baltic) where there was a lot of migration between 1865 and 1875 to Northern England and Scotland. Some of these migrants also went to or via France (Paris), Sweden, Netherlands and other intermediate stops. 

DNA testing may give you matches also.

For Poland use the JRI Poland website - and Litvak SIG for areas that changed hands between Poland and Lithuania.

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Re: Simeon Greenberg #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

Greenberg is a very, very common Jewish name. I have family links by marriage to Greenbergs in Edinburgh (from Vistytis in Lithuania, formerly in Suwalki in Poland until 1919) and Greenbergs in Bradford (from the same area). But they are not related to each other, nor to Greenbergs who may have come to Birmingham, as far as I can make out. Both these Greenbergs came over 1865 to 1875. Greenberg was one of those adopted names based on geographical features.  It is far too common to make assumptions of a relationship. You need more information. 

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Re: Help needed to interpret details in Offenbach Jüdische Einwohnermeldekartei #germany

sohail.husain@...
 

Hi Ines

Thank you so much for replying. Your help is much appreciated.

It had crossed my mind that the two dates could be for the reason you have suggested, and the fact that both that you and Ernst-Peter independently had a similar idea adds more weight to that possible explanation.

Landau (Hessen) rather than Landau (Bayern) also seems very plausible. However, I cannot find any record of a barracks (Kaserne) there at the beginning of the 20th Century. So perhaps he went there for a different reason, as suggested by Ernst-Peter. He was a butcher (Metzger) so not sure that he would have gone there for education/ professional development, but maybe for work?

With regard to the '1.8.1914' entry on the card, the dark line does seem significant and it is also a significant date. I wonder if it indicates that his father lived at that address on his own after mobilisation. But curiously that date is 'out of sequence' and is written in the upper part of the space available, as if it was anticipated that another date would be written below.

Thank you again for your thoughts
Sohail Husain

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