Date   

Re: Script Hebrew name translations #translation

Odeda Zlotnick
 


 dens1011@...
00:54   
I have this marriage document and would like help reading the script Hebrew names. I believe it is for my ggrandmother Leibe and ggrandfather Beryl Miler in Grinkiskis, Lithuania.
The marriage document was created and signed in "------- PA in North America".  Not at all in Lithuania.  There's a Hebrew date on it as well.
--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


ViewMate Translation request - German #translation

Geoff Kaiser
 

Hi All,
 
I have a letter written in Feb 1939 by my great Aunt Rosa (Lichtenstein) KAISER to one of her sons in Sao Paulo Brazil.  I think she is writing in despair as she is the only one left of the family in Breslau.
There are four pages and I would really appreciate a translation that I can then share with her grand-daughter that I have recently discover living in Curitiba, Brazil.
 
 
Many thanks
Geoff Kaiser
Melbourne, Australia


JGS Toronto. Virtual Meeting. How Best to use Databases of the USHMM. Megan Lewis. Sunday, 21 November, 2021 at 10:30 a.m. ET. #events #holocaust

Jerry Scherer
 

JEWISH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF TORONTO

 

How Best to Use the Databases of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM)

 

Presented by Megan Lewis, Reference Librarian, USHMM

 

Sunday, 21 November 2021 at 10:30 a.m. ET.

 

VIRTUAL MEETING: Join from Home

 

 

Megan Lewis will speak about the multiple resources available online in Holocaust Survivors and Victims Database of the USHMM website. Genealogists can learn about a variety of collections made available by the divisions of the Museum’s Library and Archives to assist members with their family history research.

 

Since 1998, Megan Lewis has served in different roles at the USHMM. Her expertise and familiarity with the Museum’s resources has been much in demand. She has spoken at many genealogy conferences, meetings and programmes.  Lewis has earned a BA in History and a Master’s of Library Science from the University of Maryland.  In addition, she holds a post graduate certificate in Curation and Management of Digital Assets.

 

Megan Lewis

Reference Librarian 

National Institute for Holocaust Documentation

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

 

       

To register, please go to jgstoronto.ca/register

You will then receive an immediate acknowledgement plus the link to access the event on 21 November.

 

The presentation will be recorded. It will be available to JGS Toronto members in the “Members Only” section of the Society website, a few days after the event. It will also be available to non-member registrants for one week after the event in the “Registration” location.

 

To our guests, consider joining our membership for only $40.00 per year by Clicking Here or consider a donation by Clicking Here to assist us in continuing our mission providing a forum for the exchange of genealogical knowledge and information. (Canadians receive a CRA tax receipt.)

 

 

info@...     www.jgstoronto.ca    Tel: 647-247-6414

twitter: jgsoftoronto   facebook: Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto

 

 

Jerry Scherer

Vice President, Communications

jscherer@...

 

 

 


CORRECTION Holocaust in the 21st Century Panel Discussion November 16 #announcements #holocaust

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Time for the discussion panel is: November 16, 2021 is 2:00-3:30 PM EST /11:00AM-12:30 PM PST

 

 

The Center for Jewish History is holding a discussion, Holocaust History in the 21st Century on November 16, 2021 2:00-3:30 PM EST/ 11:00AM-12:30 PM PST. It is a free program.

 

To get tickets go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/holocaust-history-in-the-21st-century-tickets-168125372515

Fill out the number of free tickets in the general admission box.,

 

From the earliest efforts by survivors themselves to document the destruction of European Jews to the enormous international and interdisciplinary literature being produced today, the historiography of the Holocaust has both followed the course of history as a discipline through numerous turns – cultural, narrative, forensic, spatial, etc... – and opened up new methodological paths of its own. As LBI's Shared History Project concludes its examination of the darkest chapter in the 1,700-year history of Jewish life in German-speaking lands, panelists Elizabeth Anthony (USHMM), Anna Hájková (University of Warwick), and Joanna Sliwa (Claims Conference) reflect on the past, present, and future of Holocaust historiography. Aubrey Pomerance (Jewish Museum Berlin) moderates.

 

About the Panelists

Elizabeth Anthony is the Director of Visiting Scholar Programs at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which supports significant research and writing about the Holocaust and related topics with a particular goal of ensuring the development of a new generation of scholars. Her own research focuses on the postwar Jewish community of Vienna and the records of the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive. Her book, The Compromise of Return: Viennese Jews after the Holocaust (2021) is a co-publication of Wayne State University Press and the USHMM. From 2005–2007, she was a case worker and case work manager for HIAS in Vienna, Austria.

 

Anna Hájková is Associate Professor of Modern European Continental History at the University of Warwick, UK. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. She is the author of The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt (Oxford University Press, 2020), the first in-depth analytical history of prison society during the Holocaust, based on archival sources from dozens of archives from ten countries and in nine languages. She has been working on history of Theresienstadt since 2000, and between 2006 and 2008 was the co-editor of Theresienstädter Studien und Dokumente. She has also co-edited the anthology Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941–1945, and co-authored The Last Veit Simons from Berlin: Holocaust, Gender, and the End of the German-Jewish Bourgeoisie. She regularly contributes to mass media in English, German, and Czech in the publications Haaretz, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Tablet, and Tagespiegel.

 

Joanna Sliwa is Historian at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference). Her own research focuses on the Holocaust in Poland and on Polish-Jewish history. Joanna has taught at Kean University and Rutgers University, and she served as an educator in teacher training programs on the Holocaust. Joanna’s book, Jewish Childhood in Kraków: A Microhistory of the Holocaust (Rutgers University Press, 2021) was awarded a 2020 Ernst Fraenkel Prize from the Wiener Holocaust Library.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Researching: family Wasserman from Tarnow Poland/Galicia #galicia #poland

Yitschok Margareten
 

Osias (Shaya) Wasserman, his wife Sima and their family, from Tarnow Poland/Galicia. (in the years 1840-1920).


Apparently, there were a few Wassermans with the name Shaya, they were probably related, I'm trying to establish the connection, and if they are related to my grandfather Solomon Zalmen Wasserman.

My grandfather Solomon Zalmen Wasserman was born in Tarnow, and eventually emigrated to Slovakia, he died in 1922 at the age of 76, and his final resting place is in Trencin Slovakia. 

I know that his mother's name was Sima. Searching through the Tarnow records I found only one Sima Wasserman who was married to Osias/Shaya, and they indeed had a child Solomon Zalmen born in 1858, (Solomon also named one of his sons Shaya).

If anybody has information on this family, I would appreciate their help. 


--
Yitschok Margareten


Re: Questions about military service in late 1800's in Belarus / Poland #belarus #poland

deltagints@...
 

Nowdays main keeper of military records is state of Russia.

There is information about military recruitment system.

Archive inquiry can be developed on commercial basis.
IMHO due name doubles and other risks, it is preferable to know army unit, locations, etc.
instead of just first and last names.

Mr. Gints Neiburgs
in Riga, Latvia, EU

www.ģenealoģija.lv


Re: Finding family born Russian Poland #records #unitedkingdom

l.m.constantine@...
 

Thank you everyone lots to go on here. 

I have found naturalisation papers for both Lazarus Samson and Simeon Greenberg from The National Archives collection but even they are not clear about their place of origin 

Lynda Constantine 


Re: Script Hebrew name translations #translation

Yitschok Margareten
 

The groom is Mayer Moshe son of Dov Miller (Dov is the Hebrew name for Berl). 
The bride is Liba Rivkah daughter of Chaim Yisroel the Cohen. 
--
Yitschok Margareten


Script Hebrew name translations #translation

dens1011@...
 

I have this marriage document and would like help reading the script Hebrew names. I believe it is for my ggrandmother Leibe and ggrandfather Beryl Miler in Grinkiskis, Lithuania.
I am not concerned with a translation of the extensive Hebrew text. Thank you so much for your help.
Denise Miller Sullivan


Jewish Studies Catalog, Rowman and Littlefield #poland

Frank Szmulowicz
 

Publisher Rowman and Littlefield has just issued its 2021-2022 Jewish Studies Catalog
https://rowman.com/catalogs/LXJewishStudiesDIGITAL/mobile/index.html,
Included you will find "The Towns of Death" by Miroslaw Tryczyk, translated by yours truly. Those of you with ties to the towns in Eastern Poland -
Jedwabne, 
Radziłów, 
Wąsosz, 
Szczuczyn, 
Skaje,
Bzury, 
Lipnik, 
Danowo, 
Dzięgiele, 
Goniądz, 
Rajgród, 
Kolno, 
Suchowola, 
Brańsk, 
Jasionówka - 
will find ample material on their history and the pogroms that took place 
there in 1941-42. Many people are mentioned by name. 

You may also find other titles of interest in the catalog.

P. S. Rebate coupons and e-book versions make many of the books more affordable. Libraries should also find the catalog of interest.

Frank Szmulowicz


International Federation of Library associations & Institutions - Lublin, Romania & Europeana Migration - webinar #announcements

Rose Feldman
 

Libraries are widely appreciated as stewards of local history and repositories of community’s collective memory but engaging communities with these collections and their local story has become an equally important role for libraries and other cultural institutions.

The IFLA Local History and Genealogy Section is hosting a webinar on 23 November 2021.  In this webinar, you can hear about ‘Brama’s Grodzka – Teatr NN’ work focusing on the history of Lublin, especially on its Jewish district which was completely destroyed during World War II.

Using archival materials, photographs and recorded oral histories and also advanced technical methods, the institution restores the knowledge of the forgotten heritage for the contemporary inhabitants of the city in innovative and engaging ways.

Meanwhile, the Europeana 1914-1918 roadshows in Romania managed not only to collect from Romanian public documents, stories, photos and all kind of memorabilia from World War One’s time, but to also successfully engage diverse categories of public.

Europeana Migration, another successful crowdsourcing project run by Europeana and its partners focused on gathering personal migration stories and associated objects such as pictures, diaries, videos or letters. These stories are part of Europe’s rich and shared history of migration and are recorded for the future.

In this webinar we shall also hear about the Europeana Migration Campaign in Serbia.

Speakers

  • Cristina Roiu – Head International Marketing Department, Romanian Academy Library,
    Member- Steering Group; Europeana Communicators Community; Local History and Genealogy Section Standing Committee Member
  • Emil Majuk – Curator, Tadeusz Przystojecki -genealogist: Brama Grodzka- Teatr NN, Lublin Poland
  • Tamara Butigan – Head of Digital Library Department, National Library of Serbia , Europeana Network Association Councillor

 

 

Please visit the event page of IFLA (https://www.ifla.org/events/all-our-memories-engaging-local-communities-with-their-local-history/) and check the content of the webinar on the IFLA HP.
We can now register the 23 November Webinar.

 

 

Rose Feldman
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year

Israel Genealogy Research Association 
Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

 


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy


Re: A book in English about the Jewish history of Byelaya Tserkov #ukraine #general

Shimona Kushner
 

Dear Irene and anyone else who can help.  In the past I asked about the book on the Jewish History of Byelaya Tserkov which I wanted to purchase.  Irene kindly gave me the e mail address of Natella Andryushchenko who seems to be the director of the Jewish school in the city and is responsible for the sale of the book.  She answered me and since then has been promising to send me copies of the book, but never followed through.  Before coming to Israel (where I live) she said she would send me 2 copies of the book from here.  Has anyone succeeded in purchasing/getting this book?  Does anyone know how I can get her to follow up on her promises?  Thank you.  Please respond to my personal e mail:  shimona@g.technion.ac.il

Shimona Yaroslavsky Kushner
Haifa, Israel


Re: Possible descendancy from Reb. Chaim of Volozhin #rabbinic

Alison Drucker
 

Sorry for belated response.  Like you, I am interested in rabbinic descent from Reb Chaim and I would appreciate any info you can share.  My email is Alison.drucker18@....
     I kept my maiden name when I married.  My paternal grandfather was Harry Drucker, supposedly from Chernobyl near Kiev, and everyone says he came from a rabbinic line.  So i have been looking for other rabbis with that surname.  I found a newspaper article from Pittsburgh PA about a Sol Drucker, who was described as "the son of Rabbi Lazarus Drucker and Sarah Drucker, a direct lineal descendant of Reb. Chaim Volozhiner, the founder of the Volozhiner Yeshivah."   
    Anything about tracing the family tree of Reb Chaim of Volozhin would be of interest to me.
Thanks so much, be well,  and best of luck!
Alison Drucker
Also, from a Nov. 2 message on JewishGen, I know of a woman Naomi who also is interested in this subject.  Her email is nbloch2@...


Re: Census of Jews in Brookline, MA #general #usa

pweinthal
 

Suggest you contact the historian at the temple in Brookline, Ohabei Shalom (founded 1842) and the Judaica collection reference librarian at Brandeis University's Goldfarb Library. Numerous U.S. Jewish population estimates in cities, states, and regions have been made over time and published. (e.g. American Jewish Year Book). Market researchers can find that demographic slice. Pew Research found me 2 years ago for a survey.

Unlike Europe, the U.S. census does not contain a question about religion.

Pat Weinthal
Boston, MA


Holocaust in the 21st Century Panel Discussion November 16 #announcements #holocaust

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

The Center for Jewish History is holding a discussion, Holocaust History in the 21st Century on November 16, 2021 8:00AM-9:30 AM EST/ 11:00AM-12:30 PM PST. It is a free program.

 

To get tickets go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/holocaust-history-in-the-21st-century-tickets-168125372515

Fill out the number of free tickets in the general admission box.,

 

From the earliest efforts by survivors themselves to document the destruction of European Jews to the enormous international and interdisciplinary literature being produced today, the historiography of the Holocaust has both followed the course of history as a discipline through numerous turns – cultural, narrative, forensic, spatial, etc... – and opened up new methodological paths of its own. As LBI's Shared History Project concludes its examination of the darkest chapter in the 1,700-year history of Jewish life in German-speaking lands, panelists Elizabeth Anthony (USHMM), Anna Hájková (University of Warwick), and Joanna Sliwa (Claims Conference) reflect on the past, present, and future of Holocaust historiography. Aubrey Pomerance (Jewish Museum Berlin) moderates.

 

About the Panelists

Elizabeth Anthony is the Director of Visiting Scholar Programs at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which supports significant research and writing about the Holocaust and related topics with a particular goal of ensuring the development of a new generation of scholars. Her own research focuses on the postwar Jewish community of Vienna and the records of the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive. Her book, The Compromise of Return: Viennese Jews after the Holocaust (2021) is a co-publication of Wayne State University Press and the USHMM. From 2005–2007, she was a case worker and case work manager for HIAS in Vienna, Austria.

 

Anna Hájková is Associate Professor of Modern European Continental History at the University of Warwick, UK. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. She is the author of The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt (Oxford University Press, 2020), the first in-depth analytical history of prison society during the Holocaust, based on archival sources from dozens of archives from ten countries and in nine languages. She has been working on history of Theresienstadt since 2000, and between 2006 and 2008 was the co-editor of Theresienstädter Studien und Dokumente. She has also co-edited the anthology Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941–1945, and co-authored The Last Veit Simons from Berlin: Holocaust, Gender, and the End of the German-Jewish Bourgeoisie. She regularly contributes to mass media in English, German, and Czech in the publications Haaretz, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Tablet, and Tagespiegel.

 

Joanna Sliwa is Historian at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference). Her own research focuses on the Holocaust in Poland and on Polish-Jewish history. Joanna has taught at Kean University and Rutgers University, and she served as an educator in teacher training programs on the Holocaust. Joanna’s book, Jewish Childhood in Kraków: A Microhistory of the Holocaust (Rutgers University Press, 2021) was awarded a 2020 Ernst Fraenkel Prize from the Wiener Holocaust Library.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Origin of family name: GRIMLE #names

Michael Cohen
 

Sherri,

Thanks for the suggestion.  Unfortunately, Grimle wasn't there :-(
--
Michael L. Cohen
Madison, WI


Re: Vienna Austria Opens First Public Memorial Listing Holocaust Victims' Names #announcements #austria-czech #holocaust #names

Andreas Schwab
 

If members of your family are not listed, it may be because the documentation that was available was not enough for their inclusion. From one case I am involved it appears that a Yad Vashem page of testimony is not enough, they are looking for Austrian documents such as birth records, directory entries etc. In any case, I suggest that you contact the documentation centre and make a petition to enter your relatives into the data base. It is never too late:
"Any additions or corrections submitted by the deadline of August 10, 2020 will be considered for the Shoah Wall of Names Memorial. Victims registered after the deadline of will still be inscribed on another stele of the memorial.
--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


Vilnius orphanages #lithuania

Carolyn Amacher
 

My cousin, based on DNA, was in the orphanage in vilnius in 1937 when he was adopted and brought to Turku, Finland.  Does anyone know the names of orphanages so I can research his adoption records? Any tips on getting adoption records?

Carolyn Horowitz Amacher
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Looking for the town of Gorodische and for the Homborav family #names #records #russia

Marcia Segal
 

Greetings,

My family (one and maybe two branches) came from the town of Gorodische. It is said to have been 100 miles from Kiev, but there are two towns with that name within that vicinity. Records for the town don't seem to be available online, and I'm not sure which direction to go in to do further research.

And to make matters more interesting: their surname on the petition for naturalization (Homborav) was Americanized to Gomborow (and some family members used Gomborov). I'm not having luck with the original surname research, either. My paternal grandmother did what she could to keep the Gomborow name alive (lots of kids in the family got it as a middle name) but it died out in the 1970s (the last people with that name changed it when their mother remarried).

Guidance welcome on any element of this two-part ghost hunt.
Marcia Segal
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Sincerely,
Marcia Segal


Looking for descendants of Srul (Raul ?) Sehtman, Chaco, Argentina and Buenos Aires #latinamerica

Avraham Y. Kahana
 

Hi all,
In investigating new developments on my Schechtman connections, I would be very thankful for any help in getting in direct contact with one Srul Sehtman (likely Shejtman in Spanish spelling) who is said to have settled in Chaco, Argentina. I heard his adopted the local name of Raul (and apparently has a grandson named Raul as well).

In addition, I learned that relatives from the same family reside also in Buenos Aires, Argentina. There is supposedly a doctor named Mario Sehtman/Shejtman.

Thanks in advance,
Avraham Y. Kahana
Israel
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately

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