Date   

Re: Searching: WILENSKY/VILENSKY #general

Peter_Hills <Peter_Hills@...>
 

I posted a message a couple of days ago about VELONSKY as an article I
have written about the surname has just been published. I have quite a lot
of information about Vilonsky and variants. Happy to post article to you
if you provide postal address or I could even try email! What info have you
got about your ancestral town? Did you get any other responses?

Peter Hills
(My father changed his name >from Velonsky to Hills in 1935)

London UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching: WILENSKY/VILENSKY #general

Peter_Hills <Peter_Hills@...>
 

I posted a message a couple of days ago about VELONSKY as an article I
have written about the surname has just been published. I have quite a lot
of information about Vilonsky and variants. Happy to post article to you
if you provide postal address or I could even try email! What info have you
got about your ancestral town? Did you get any other responses?

Peter Hills
(My father changed his name >from Velonsky to Hills in 1935)

London UK


Records #poland

Vivian Salama <salassoc@...>
 

Where would I write to find records of Silesian cities and towns when they
were under German rule? I am specifically looking for 19th century birth,
marriage and death records of towns such as: Breslau, Striegau, Glatz,
Brieg, Waldenburg.

Vivian Brieger Salama
Hillsborough, CA


JRI Poland #Poland Records #poland

Vivian Salama <salassoc@...>
 

Where would I write to find records of Silesian cities and towns when they
were under German rule? I am specifically looking for 19th century birth,
marriage and death records of towns such as: Breslau, Striegau, Glatz,
Brieg, Waldenburg.

Vivian Brieger Salama
Hillsborough, CA


Re: Minsk Revision List 1811 - Part 1 #belarus

Peri282ul@...
 

Vitaly Charny wrote:
<< compiled and transliterate >from Russian the list of
Jewish surnames >from Minsk, Belarus I found in
Revision List (Revizhskaya Skazka) 1811. >>

Thank you for the list, hoever my family is >from Pinsk. My name Papish is
actuallly in the book "The Names of the Kingdom of Russia or Poland" I am
unsure of the exact title. Is anyone doing a name list >from Pinsk?

Barbara Papish

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Barbara, perhaps you can organize a group of people
with an interest in Pinsk and do a project to transliterate the Revision
List >from Pinsk.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Minsk Revision List 1811 - Part 1 #belarus

Peri282ul@...
 

Vitaly Charny wrote:
<< compiled and transliterate >from Russian the list of
Jewish surnames >from Minsk, Belarus I found in
Revision List (Revizhskaya Skazka) 1811. >>

Thank you for the list, hoever my family is >from Pinsk. My name Papish is
actuallly in the book "The Names of the Kingdom of Russia or Poland" I am
unsure of the exact title. Is anyone doing a name list >from Pinsk?

Barbara Papish

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Barbara, perhaps you can organize a group of people
with an interest in Pinsk and do a project to transliterate the Revision
List >from Pinsk.


Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

korman3@...
 

I think that death records are the least reliable of all records. Often,
the information is given by a person who is the least distressed and
with the least accurate information at the time of the death. Of a
husband and wife, the spouse who dies first has a much better chance of
having a certificate with the correct information because the other
spouse, who knows the information, is alive and available for
questioning. When the second spouse dies, all bets are off. An in law,
neighbor or grandchild could have provided the information and just got
it all mixed up with other family information.

In my family I have a similar situation. In marriage records >from the
1870s, the mother is listed as Sarlotta Kanitz Back. But when she died
(and she died second) all of a sudden she's Sarlotta Epstein.

So, I'd go with the birth certificate and try to find more corroborating
sources.

Debbi


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

korman3@...
 

I think that death records are the least reliable of all records. Often,
the information is given by a person who is the least distressed and
with the least accurate information at the time of the death. Of a
husband and wife, the spouse who dies first has a much better chance of
having a certificate with the correct information because the other
spouse, who knows the information, is alive and available for
questioning. When the second spouse dies, all bets are off. An in law,
neighbor or grandchild could have provided the information and just got
it all mixed up with other family information.

In my family I have a similar situation. In marriage records >from the
1870s, the mother is listed as Sarlotta Kanitz Back. But when she died
(and she died second) all of a sudden she's Sarlotta Epstein.

So, I'd go with the birth certificate and try to find more corroborating
sources.

Debbi


Re: Graz Austria #austria-czech

DWSAnes@...
 

In August, we were in Austria and Germany. At the request of a member of H-
Sig, I sought out information on his family in Graz. In doing so, I learned
that there is a Jewish community in existence in Graz at the sight of the
former Synagogue. It is run by a Doktor Henker (frau). They have computerized
all of the birth, marriage and death records of the Jewish communities in
Styria (Southeastern Austria), There are between 100-150 members of the
Jewish community in Graz. The office is the Israelitische Kultusgemeinde at
58 Grieskai. There is a black obelisk monument on the site of the former
synagogue as well a plaque on the wall of the adjoining building which
currently houses the office. In the offices there is a chapel which is
currently used primarily for the high holy day services. They hope to begin
to construct a new synagogue within the next year on the site of the previous
one. I was given a book entitled "Geschichte der Juden in Sudost-Osterreich
(I have not figured out how to get the umlauts of the two o's). Suffice to
report that there is quite a history of the jews in and about this area of
Austria.

The Austrian part of our trip was in conjunction with the International
Federation of University Women. After leaving Graz we went into Germany and
spent two weeks doing Genalogy research on our families. We had amazing luck
and obtained a wealth of information and made many contacts. This was mostly
in the Frnaconia area of Bavaria as well as Baden Wurttenburg and Hessen.
More about this later should any one be interested.

DWStein DWSAnes@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Graz Austria #hungary

DWSAnes@...
 

In August, we were in Austria and Germany. At the request of a member of H-
Sig, I sought out information on his family in Graz. In doing so, I learned
that there is a Jewish community in existence in Graz at the sight of the
former Synagogue. It is run by a Doktor Henker (frau). They have computerized
all of the birth, marriage and death records of the Jewish communities in
Styria (Southeastern Austria), There are between 100-150 members of the
Jewish community in Graz. The office is the Israelitische Kultusgemeinde at
58 Grieskai. There is a black obelisk monument on the site of the former
synagogue as well a plaque on the wall of the adjoining building which
currently houses the office. In the offices there is a chapel which is
currently used primarily for the high holy day services. They hope to begin
to construct a new synagogue within the next year on the site of the previous
one. I was given a book entitled "Geschichte der Juden in Sudost-Osterreich
(I have not figured out how to get the umlauts of the two o's). Suffice to
report that there is quite a history of the jews in and about this area of
Austria.

The Austrian part of our trip was in conjunction with the International
Federation of University Women. After leaving Graz we went into Germany and
spent two weeks doing Genalogy research on our families. We had amazing luck
and obtained a wealth of information and made many contacts. This was mostly
in the Frnaconia area of Bavaria as well as Baden Wurttenburg and Hessen.
More about this later should any one be interested.

DWStein DWSAnes@aol.com


Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

Gzsuzsi@...
 

Ed,

In a message dated 9/30/98 6:43:49 PM, you wrote:

<<Cecilia came to U.S. in 1882. I have her "Anyakonyvi kivonat" (an original,

with her birth date of 1855). This form has her mothers name: Hangyabor

Schwarz. So I thought H. Schwarz was my GGM. The kivonat is dated 1876; is

that significant?

Although I'm not familiar with Hungarian names of the mid 1800s, I have never
heard of the name "Hangyabor". If it exists, it sounds extremely Hungarian
(translated- it means 'antwine'). There is another name of this nature,
Gyongyver - 'pearlblood', but the Jews who used that name, mostly in the
1900s, used the form Gyongyi - no 'blood' word in it.

The way I see it, there may be a mistake in Cecilia's birth year (she may have
been the youngest sister and perhaps by that time your ggfather may have had a
second wife. Or, the the Cecilia whose "Kivonat" you have may not be your
Cecilia.

Susan Geroe


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

Gzsuzsi@...
 

Ed,

In a message dated 9/30/98 6:43:49 PM, you wrote:

<<Cecilia came to U.S. in 1882. I have her "Anyakonyvi kivonat" (an original,

with her birth date of 1855). This form has her mothers name: Hangyabor

Schwarz. So I thought H. Schwarz was my GGM. The kivonat is dated 1876; is

that significant?

Although I'm not familiar with Hungarian names of the mid 1800s, I have never
heard of the name "Hangyabor". If it exists, it sounds extremely Hungarian
(translated- it means 'antwine'). There is another name of this nature,
Gyongyver - 'pearlblood', but the Jews who used that name, mostly in the
1900s, used the form Gyongyi - no 'blood' word in it.

The way I see it, there may be a mistake in Cecilia's birth year (she may have
been the youngest sister and perhaps by that time your ggfather may have had a
second wife. Or, the the Cecilia whose "Kivonat" you have may not be your
Cecilia.

Susan Geroe


Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

PGergay@...
 

Dear Ed,
As you probably surmised, the date on the Birth Registry Extract is,
normally, insignificant and irrelevant. The only exception is when it provides
the audit trail for name changes, such as one occuring due to remarriage.
The explanation for a different name for the mother of one of the sisters
(Cecilia) probably lies in a very common error of those times. Usually, the
births were reported by a mid-wife, whose name frequently (and, of course,
mistakenly) was entered as the mother's name. You can very easily determine
now if this was the case---if you need any guidance on how to go about it ,
please contact me privately, through my E-mail (preferrably not until mid-
November).
By the way, I assume that you know that the names Katalin and Katharina
are interchangeable (usually, primarily depending on the nationality of the
Registrar, rather than the names actually given....)
Regards,
Peter A. Gergay
San Francisco, CA


Goldmans of Hungary/Austria Where From ? #hungary

CASHEL3776@...
 

I've been having a problem with the Goldman family >from Austria or is it
Hungary. Half of the census records states Austria, as do some family members
and the rest >from Hungary. Some go back and forth with the place names.

I have David And Emma Stein Goldman and their son, Henry arriving into the US
(New York) in 1887. Because of the time peroid, I have been unable, so far, to
locate a passenger list.
However, David's 19 year old sister, Sadie Goldman, arrives from
Hungary/Austria in 1900 and according to the census record has been in the US
only 3-4 months. The 1900 census has her >from Austria and the 1910 states
she's >from Hungary. At least if the 3-4 months time peroid is accurate, I
should have a better chance of locating a passenger record because I would
onlyhave a 3 months span of ship records to check. I also did not find her on
the soundex cards films.

My question is: Would someone coming >from Austria most likely arrive in the US
from Hamburg. Perhaps if I can locate >from her passenger records the place she
came, it will help me in locating where David and Emma came >from and perhaps
locate both his and her parents.

Thanx,
Ley K. O'Connor


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Puzzled about my GGM #hungary

PGergay@...
 

Dear Ed,
As you probably surmised, the date on the Birth Registry Extract is,
normally, insignificant and irrelevant. The only exception is when it provides
the audit trail for name changes, such as one occuring due to remarriage.
The explanation for a different name for the mother of one of the sisters
(Cecilia) probably lies in a very common error of those times. Usually, the
births were reported by a mid-wife, whose name frequently (and, of course,
mistakenly) was entered as the mother's name. You can very easily determine
now if this was the case---if you need any guidance on how to go about it ,
please contact me privately, through my E-mail (preferrably not until mid-
November).
By the way, I assume that you know that the names Katalin and Katharina
are interchangeable (usually, primarily depending on the nationality of the
Registrar, rather than the names actually given....)
Regards,
Peter A. Gergay
San Francisco, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Goldmans of Hungary/Austria Where From ? #hungary

CASHEL3776@...
 

I've been having a problem with the Goldman family >from Austria or is it
Hungary. Half of the census records states Austria, as do some family members
and the rest >from Hungary. Some go back and forth with the place names.

I have David And Emma Stein Goldman and their son, Henry arriving into the US
(New York) in 1887. Because of the time peroid, I have been unable, so far, to
locate a passenger list.
However, David's 19 year old sister, Sadie Goldman, arrives from
Hungary/Austria in 1900 and according to the census record has been in the US
only 3-4 months. The 1900 census has her >from Austria and the 1910 states
she's >from Hungary. At least if the 3-4 months time peroid is accurate, I
should have a better chance of locating a passenger record because I would
onlyhave a 3 months span of ship records to check. I also did not find her on
the soundex cards films.

My question is: Would someone coming >from Austria most likely arrive in the US
from Hamburg. Perhaps if I can locate >from her passenger records the place she
came, it will help me in locating where David and Emma came >from and perhaps
locate both his and her parents.

Thanx,
Ley K. O'Connor


'Jewish' surnames #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

To add to George Gaugusch's interesting post:
for Deutschkreutz and vicinity (today's middle Burgenland), almost all Boehm families were Christian, as were many Trebitsch families, and the occasional Blau family.

I think the original point of discussion was not whether some surnames were
typically Jewish, but whether they were exclusively or definitively Jewish.

This H-Sig thread has demonstrated that surnames need genealogical
research, since assumptions are just that.

I know of a couple excellent books on surnames and their sources for the
truly East European Jewries, but I have not seen one for Central Europe.

George's post alone shows how far-ranging such a book would have to be, to
cover the many regional variations of Central and East Central Europe.

Best,
Maureen Tighe-Brown
University of Pittsburgh


Hungary SIG #Hungary 'Jewish' surnames #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

To add to George Gaugusch's interesting post:
for Deutschkreutz and vicinity (today's middle Burgenland), almost all Boehm families were Christian, as were many Trebitsch families, and the occasional Blau family.

I think the original point of discussion was not whether some surnames were
typically Jewish, but whether they were exclusively or definitively Jewish.

This H-Sig thread has demonstrated that surnames need genealogical
research, since assumptions are just that.

I know of a couple excellent books on surnames and their sources for the
truly East European Jewries, but I have not seen one for Central Europe.

George's post alone shows how far-ranging such a book would have to be, to
cover the many regional variations of Central and East Central Europe.

Best,
Maureen Tighe-Brown
University of Pittsburgh


Request for Translator - Hebrew #belarus

LOGAN M LOCKABEY <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Dear Members:

I just received excerpts >from a Vitebsk document that contain
information on three of my family names; TZADKIN, GREENBLATT,
RABINOWITZ.

These pages are in Hebrew and I am requesting someone to translate them
for me. There are 2 pages of index and 3 pages of text.
Please respond directly to me loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Many thanks.

Logan Lockabey
Costa Mesa, California
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Try the JewishGen Translation Service
<http://www.jewishgen.org/mentprog/m_trans.htm>. Also check out the
JewishGen Marketplace for Translators
<http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?Jg2~Market~Search~Translators>.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Request for Translator - Hebrew #belarus

LOGAN M LOCKABEY <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Dear Members:

I just received excerpts >from a Vitebsk document that contain
information on three of my family names; TZADKIN, GREENBLATT,
RABINOWITZ.

These pages are in Hebrew and I am requesting someone to translate them
for me. There are 2 pages of index and 3 pages of text.
Please respond directly to me loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Many thanks.

Logan Lockabey
Costa Mesa, California
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Try the JewishGen Translation Service
<http://www.jewishgen.org/mentprog/m_trans.htm>. Also check out the
JewishGen Marketplace for Translators
<http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?Jg2~Market~Search~Translators>.