Date   

(Russian and Ukraine) Vera Miller Posts About More Russian and Ukrainian Records Online #announcements #records #russia #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

  

 

Ver Miller’s Find Lost Russian and Ukrainian Family blog has posted about scanned records online from the Russian and Ukrainian Archives.  If you are not conversant in either language it is advisable to download a language translator such as Google translate https://translate.google.com/ or https://www.deepl.com/en/translator

 

On Vera’s blog she has a video guide on reading Russian records to catch the basic information. She also has a cheat sheet for reading Russian script.

 

To read her latest blog posting see:

https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/scanned-russian-and-ukrainian-archive-records/

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 

 


Help Please# #translation #lithuania

pwalman@...
 

Hi
I must appologise in advance as I've been out of the loop for over 10 years. I came back to doing research following the release of the English 1921 Census and have now got hooked again on my family tree. Whilst going through old paperwork I found the attached documents which I ordered but never got translated. I beleive there are from what I think are my family in the 1876 Lithuanian Revision List. Any help in their translation would be very much appreciated. Many thanks in advance. Paul Walman

Researching Surnames:-
WALMAN, WALDMAN, WOOLMAN, VALDMAN - Lithuania
KATZ,KATSEN,KATCIN - Riga Latvia
SENK, SANK - Plock, Plotkz


Re: Coincidence? #general

ramot418@...
 

@ Banai Lynn Feldstein
"I heard a rabbi explain once, but I only recall some of the story. It was important to remember the yahrzeit, the anniversary of their death."
Quite true. But one also must know at least the week of birth of a male child, so as to celebrate his bar mitzvah at the correct time. A lot of boys were told (or they remembered from their bar mitzvah) that they were born during the week of the <whatever> weekly portion of the Torah.
--
Steve Goldberg
Jerusalem, Israel
Researching:
Sagan/Shagan family from Veliuona (Velon), Lithuania
Goldberg family from Vidukle, Lithuania
Susselovitch/Zuselovitch family from Raseiniai (Rassein), Lithuania


Re: Birth Registry, Minsk - Yivo Archives #belarus #usa

Tammy
 

Regarding the Minsk birth records found on the YIVO website, a number of people have asked for the link. It can be found in the folder titled "Minsk Jewish Community Council, 1825-1917". Here is the link: https://archives.cjh.org/repositories/7/archival_objects/397692

There are a number of files that may be of interest to Minsk researchers. The birth records seem to be in both Cyrillic and Yiddish.

Tammy Weingarten


Spindler- Grondo #belarus #records #russia

Arthur Pronin
 

Hey
My great grandfather was Simon or Sam Spindler. Born in Grodno Poland 1888. I know his father- per death cert-was Alexander. Sam's mother was Rachel. Alexander never made it to USA-my family has said he "died young." Alex's wife Rachel remarried a name Kopitinick. Sam came to USA through Galveston in 1912-and settled in Kansas City. 

Sam had brother Yankel, a sister Sarah , a sister Mashke. Sam was raised by his grandmother Elke. 

Sam was married in Grodno in 1912 before leaving for America. His wife- Sarah Dovidovich (maiden)-came to USA via canada in 1914. Sarah born 1892.

Ive dug around looking for Alexander's parents. I see many Spindler recs on jewishgen Im almost certain some of these are their's-but I dont know best translations of what Alexander would be or even if...its something else? I see some Dovidovich's  as well -Sarah's parents were Frieda and Meyer. Hoping for some help here on Alex's parents...and possible recs on Sarah's parents...because Im stumped! 

Art Pronin


Re: Coincidence? #general

Renee Steinig
 

The grave locator on Mount Hebron's website (https://www.mounthebroncemetery.com/#search) lists only one Samuel Rosansky. He died on 22 Sep 1943 and is buried in a Workmen's Circle Section. According to the cemetery's records, he was 50 when he died.

No doubt Sam R. #1 and #2 are one and the same person and that like so many immigrants, he was inconsistent in reporting his date of birth. Or in the case of a death certificate, a relative reported a different date. If you want more reassurance, see the home address on Samuel's WWII draft card (with the 15 May 1892 birth date) and on his death record (with the 3 Sept. 1893 birth date); on both, the address is 584 Logan Street, Brooklyn.

Renee

Renee Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island) NY

On Fri, Jan 14, 2022 at 5:38 PM Ellen Gottfried <ellen@...> wrote:

Person #1 Samuel ROSANSKY born September 3, 1893 father Abram
died September 22, 1943 buried in Mt. Hebron cemetery

Person # 2 Samuel ROSANSKY born May 15, 1892 father Abram
died September 22, 1943 buried in Mt. Hebron cemetery

The date of birth for #1 was on his marriage certificate, his child's
birth certificate and his death certificate.

The date of birth for #2 was on his WW I draft card, his
naturalization certificate and his passport application.
Could this be the same man? If it is the same man, which date is
more likely for his date of birth?
Ellen GOTTFRIED, Plainview, New York


Re: Coincidence? #general

Susan&David
 

My father, who was born in what is now Poland related to me that when he asked his mother when he was born she said (in Yiddish of course)  "A week before Pesach"  When he came to the USA he guessed March 15. 

David Rosen
Boston, MA .

On 1/14/2022 8:03 PM, Banai Lynn Feldstein wrote:
Our ancestors didn't keep track of when they were born. Even the first generation in the US, their parents didn't know correct the birth dates of their kids. There's a story in my family of one kid who asked how old he was, and they thought he was about 12; they didn't know. You might find even more dates in more records. Usually they settled on a date at a certain time and gave that one in future records.

I heard a rabbi explain once, but I only recall some of the story. It was important to remember the yahrtzeit, the anniversary of their death. But not to celebrate their birth so much.

Neither date is really more reliable than the other. You'll need to find a birth record in Europe if you want to know the real correct date.
--
Banai Lynn Feldstein
Professional Genealogist
Salt Lake City, Utah
http://idogenealogy.com/
http://geneasearch.net/


Re: Coincidence? #general

Banai Lynn Feldstein
 

Our ancestors didn't keep track of when they were born. Even the first generation in the US, their parents didn't know correct the birth dates of their kids. There's a story in my family of one kid who asked how old he was, and they thought he was about 12; they didn't know. You might find even more dates in more records. Usually they settled on a date at a certain time and gave that one in future records.

I heard a rabbi explain once, but I only recall some of the story. It was important to remember the yahrtzeit, the anniversary of their death. But not to celebrate their birth so much.

Neither date is really more reliable than the other. You'll need to find a birth record in Europe if you want to know the real correct date.
--
Banai Lynn Feldstein
Professional Genealogist
Salt Lake City, Utah
http://idogenealogy.com/
http://geneasearch.net/


Webinar- Finding Your Polish Ancestors Online in the Polish State Archives #announcements #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Los Angeles Public Library will host the free virtual presentation, Finding Your Polish Ancestors Online Through the Polish State Archives, by Ted Gostin on Facebook and YouTube on Saturday, January 15, at 11:00 a.m. Pacific time.

 

Program: This lecture reviews the “Search in the Archives” database, the largest with over 37 million scans; the AGAD archives website with record images from formerly Polish territories, particularly Galicia; and a third database from the Kujawia region; along with several more databases from individual branches of the archives.


Speaker: Ted Gostin, a professional genealogist who has researched Polish roots for over 40 years, as he reviews the growing resource of Polish State Archives databases.

 

See:

https://www.lapl.org/whats-on/events/genealogy-garage-finding-your-polish-ancestors-online-through-polish-state-archives

 

Streaming will be live on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/lapubliclibrary

And on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJqAzI9vxGk

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 


Yiddish Translation Needed for 1922 letter from Zagare, Lithuania #translation #yiddish

Abby Schmelling
 

This is a letter, I think in Yiddish, from an old couple in our family who were removed from their home in Zagare, Lithuania during WW I and forced to go to Siberia. They came back to their home but hoped to reach their children in the United States. Their daughter travelled there and brought them to the US. This letter was attached to the daughter’s passport request. I hope it is readable.
Abby Schmelling
River Forest, IL 

--
Abby C. Schmelling


Transcription from Polish needed #translation

Vitali Altholz
 

Could somebody please help in transcription of these two Polish documents – birth and death certificates of Ruchla Altholz (misspelled Adholc)? I can translate them from Polish by myself, but I, unfortunately, cannot understand the handwriting. The last name of the mother is Klajn. Thank you so much for your help!

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM96826

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM96824

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much!

Vitali Altholz


Re: Lithuania/Latvia and South Africa #southafrica #general #lithuania

tiarem@...
 

My grandfather, his 2 brothers and others from Raseinia, Lithuania migrated to Australia (New South Wales) in the 1870s and1880s.

Glenda Goldberg
Sydney Australia


Coincidence? #general

Ellen Gottfried
 

Person #1 Samuel ROSANSKY born September 3, 1893 father Abram
died September 22, 1943 buried in Mt. Hebron cemetery

Person # 2 Samuel ROSANSKY born May 15, 1892 father Abram
died September 22, 1943 buried in Mt. Hebron cemetery

The date of birth for #1 was on his marriage certificate, his child's
birth certificate and his death certificate.

The date of birth for #2 was on his WW I draft card, his
naturalization certificate and his passport application.
Could this be the same man? If it is the same man, which date is
more likely for his date of birth?
Ellen GOTTFRIED, Plainview, New York


Transcription and translation request: Czechoslovakian census of 1921 #translation #slovakia #subcarpathia

Carole Bass
 

Can anyone kindly provide a transcription and translation of this page in the Czechoslovakian census of 1921? It is the household of Samu Ackerman in the village of Mezőterebes (now Strabychovo, Ukraine).

I am struggling with the language, the handwriting, and the large red markings that obscure part of the entry.

Many thanks in advance.
--
Carole Bass
New Haven, Connecticut, USA
bass.carole@...


Now online: Center for Jewish History's genealogy webinar on New York City historical photos #usa

Moriah Amit
 

In case you missed it, you may now view the recording of our most recent episode of Genealogy Coffee Break at https://fb.watch/axBdwzjCZp. For those whose ancestors lived in NYC, you'll learn how to find online historical photos of the neighborhoods and blocks where they lived. 
--
Moriah Amit
Senior Genealogy Librarian, Center for Jewish History
New York, NY
mamit@...


1848 Lipto Census Uploaded #JewishGenUpdates #hungary #slovakia

Vivian Kahn
 

I am pleased to announce that 2,498 new records from the 1848 Census of Jewish residents of Lipto megye has been uploaded to the Hungary Database https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/.  Go to https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/hungary/1848HungaryJewishCensus.html for more information about the 1848 Hungarian Jewish Census. Lipto megye, now in north central Slovakia,  was close to the borders with Galicia and Austria and included the towns of Liptoszentmiklos (Liptovsky Mikulas) and Rozsahegy (Ruzomberok).  About 4.5 percent of the population was Jewish in 1880. The images, which are from the Slovak State Archives, were donated by David Zelikovski, who also transcribed the records. Please contact me off-list for more information about this data set or other Hungarian Research Division projects.

Vivian Kahn, Director
JewishGen Hungarian Research Division



Re: Lowenerg - Hellmann families from Talsi, latvia in South Africa #latvia #southafrica

lenhoff@...
 

Hi Dani,

Avraham Mendel Lowenberg lived and died in my home town in S. Africa, Upington; his death and burial records are included on the cemetery page of the KehilaLinks site that I maintain, and the tombstone photo shows his father's name as Tzvi. I know one grandson who still lives in S. Africa and although I haven't been in touch with him for decades, I can probably get his contact information if you want to follow up privately.

In response to both you and Betsy, there was a Reverend Hellman (not sure of the spelling) who served the Upington Jewish community around the 1920s.

Regards,
Bramie Lenhoff
Newark, DE, USA


Re: Location of Lenchyza Poland Russia? #poland

Michael Tobias
 

I am not sure where Robin Dryen found that information but according to the Polish State Archives website there are NO known surviving Jewish vital records for the town. The records being referred to are NON-JEWISH.

Regards

Michael Tobias
Glasgow, Scotland


Re: Locating German Passports that were surrendered to the British in Eretz-Yisrael (Palestine) #germany #records

Rose Feldman
 

Shalom Ramar,

  1. Check the iGRA collection – we have some list of passports. 
  2. Also documents from the Germany consul in Palestine was confiscated and in the Israel State Archives.

Rose Feldman
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year

Israel Genealogy Research Association  http://genealogy.org.il  
Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

  1.  

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy


LitvakSIG Vilnius District session January 30 #lithuania #announcements

David Ellis
 

LitvakSIG is providing a series of online Birds of a Feather (BOF) sessions for the various districts in Lithuania.  These informational sessions are open to the public.  Some District Research Groups will also be holding similar sessions at the annual IAJGS conference.

The BOF session for the Vilnius district will be held over Zoom on Sunday, January 30, at noon (Eastern time).

 

The Vilnius district includes the following towns: 

 

Vilnius City, Antakalnis, Bagaslaviskis, Bezdonys, Ciobiskis, Gelvonai, Giedraiciai, Inturke, Jasiunai, Joniskes, Laibiskis, Maisiagala, Mikhalishki, Moletai, Musninkai, Naujoji Vilna, Nemencine, Novygorod, Paberze, Rudamina, Salcininkai, Sesuoliai, Sirvintos, Snipiskes, Stundishki, Turgeliai, Yakubantse.

BOF sessions will be recorded and publicly available for a limited time.

 

After that, they will be available to qualified contributors to the District Research Groups.

To register for the January 30 Vilnius District session, please use the link:  https://tinyurl.com/5brnu9ay.

 

I look forward to seeing you at the session.

 

------

 

David Ellis

 

Coordinator for LitvakSIG Vilnius District Research Group

djemkitso@...

5701 - 5720 of 670883