Date   

Re: Interwar antisemitic legislation in Hungary. #hungary

BABSK@...
 

For more information about interwar and other Hungarian antisemitism -
as well as an excellent general history, read the Patai book that was
discussed on H-sig some months ago.

Barbara Kaufman


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Interwar antisemitic legislation in Hungary. #hungary

BABSK@...
 

For more information about interwar and other Hungarian antisemitism -
as well as an excellent general history, read the Patai book that was
discussed on H-sig some months ago.

Barbara Kaufman


Re: Itsko/Isaac #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 98-11-19 18:14:12 EST, jjg613@AOL.COM writes:

<< They are all the same name. Yitzhak is the hebrew equivalent of the name
Isaac. Itsig and Itsko are both Yiddish diminutives of the name. >>

First things first. Yitzhak, is Hebrew, nearly 4000 yo. It's not the
equivalent of a name some three millenia later. It'ds the original.
Isaac is the English verion via Greek & Latin. Aall THIS the equivalent.
Itsik is the Yiddish diminuitive of Yitzhak.
Itsko sounds to me like a Romanian diminuitive. It's not the way Yiddish
diminuitives are formed. Munkatsch etc. is in a region where Hungarians,
Romanians, Poles and Ukrainians co-existed. I'm not sure which country it now
is part of.

Michael Bernet, New York
Itsko is indeed Romanian diminutive (name Itskovici, Ickovici are
derived from), but traces can be also found in Ukrainian - eg.
Ickovicz/Itsykowicz, probably originated in area of Tchernowitz
(Czernowice) between the rivers Dniestr and Prut, where both cultures,
Romanian and Ukrainian have met.

Muntkasch (Munkac) is known as Mukacevo and together with the close by
central town of Ungvar(Uzgorod/Uzhhorod) those locations are presently
under the Ukrainian rule. Area is now called Zakarpatskaya Ukraina
(Transkarpatian Ukraine). Region was originally populated by the Rusins
(Transkarpatian Ukrainians), Slovaks, Hungarians (Magyars) and Jews.
There existed also small Romanian and Gypsies minorites, but Polish
population was rather unknown - you are probably confusing Slovaks with
the Poles, both tribes are Slavs, but a bit different.

Alexander Sharon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Itsko/Isaac #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 98-11-19 18:14:12 EST, jjg613@AOL.COM writes:

<< They are all the same name. Yitzhak is the hebrew equivalent of the name
Isaac. Itsig and Itsko are both Yiddish diminutives of the name. >>

First things first. Yitzhak, is Hebrew, nearly 4000 yo. It's not the
equivalent of a name some three millenia later. It'ds the original.
Isaac is the English verion via Greek & Latin. Aall THIS the equivalent.
Itsik is the Yiddish diminuitive of Yitzhak.
Itsko sounds to me like a Romanian diminuitive. It's not the way Yiddish
diminuitives are formed. Munkatsch etc. is in a region where Hungarians,
Romanians, Poles and Ukrainians co-existed. I'm not sure which country it now
is part of.

Michael Bernet, New York
Itsko is indeed Romanian diminutive (name Itskovici, Ickovici are
derived from), but traces can be also found in Ukrainian - eg.
Ickovicz/Itsykowicz, probably originated in area of Tchernowitz
(Czernowice) between the rivers Dniestr and Prut, where both cultures,
Romanian and Ukrainian have met.

Muntkasch (Munkac) is known as Mukacevo and together with the close by
central town of Ungvar(Uzgorod/Uzhhorod) those locations are presently
under the Ukrainian rule. Area is now called Zakarpatskaya Ukraina
(Transkarpatian Ukraine). Region was originally populated by the Rusins
(Transkarpatian Ukrainians), Slovaks, Hungarians (Magyars) and Jews.
There existed also small Romanian and Gypsies minorites, but Polish
population was rather unknown - you are probably confusing Slovaks with
the Poles, both tribes are Slavs, but a bit different.

Alexander Sharon


Searching WOLFSOHN-WOLSON-WOLFSON-VULFSON #general

DonHWphoto@...
 

The actual family name is unknown. Family came >from Panevezys,
Russia, 1880-1885. Tried to research the following; Hamburg
Passenger List, Census 1910 &1920; Cemetery Records; Marriage
Licenses. Have naturalization papers, death certificates for
grandfather; grandmother; father; mother; my mothers mother .I've
researched The Hamagid Database.

Donald Wilson
927 Ferngate Lane
Creve Coeur, MO 63141


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching WOLFSOHN-WOLSON-WOLFSON-VULFSON #general

DonHWphoto@...
 

The actual family name is unknown. Family came >from Panevezys,
Russia, 1880-1885. Tried to research the following; Hamburg
Passenger List, Census 1910 &1920; Cemetery Records; Marriage
Licenses. Have naturalization papers, death certificates for
grandfather; grandmother; father; mother; my mothers mother .I've
researched The Hamagid Database.

Donald Wilson
927 Ferngate Lane
Creve Coeur, MO 63141


Searching: Sarah FLASTER #general

Stargzr100@...
 

I am searching for any information on Sarah (Sallie) FLASTER. Born 1819.
Died January 19, 1924 in Kovesfalva (Kamjonka), Hungary. She had 5 children
Max, Karolina, Hannah, Adolph and Jakob.

Thanks, Rosie Blum, Farmington Hills, Michigan
Stargzr100@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Sarah FLASTER #general

Stargzr100@...
 

I am searching for any information on Sarah (Sallie) FLASTER. Born 1819.
Died January 19, 1924 in Kovesfalva (Kamjonka), Hungary. She had 5 children
Max, Karolina, Hannah, Adolph and Jakob.

Thanks, Rosie Blum, Farmington Hills, Michigan
Stargzr100@aol.com


Re: Genealogy and Genetics #general

Linda Olson <lgo1@...>
 

David Lewin wrote:

I have sudddnely been thrust into interest about genetics vs. genealogy. I
am having to deal with Prostatic Cancer (thankfully discovered early with
an "improved PSA blood test" ) and the doctors all asked about my father
and grandfathers.

I am certain that our awareness has not yet reached the level where anyone
records illnesses or causes of death as part of Genealogy. Am I right?
Ought this not to be added?

David Lewin
London

MODERATOR NOTE: Genetics and genealogy has been often discussed
on this forum. To read the messages posted on this subject search
the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives, where you will find all
messages posted after September 1993. It can be accessed directly
from our home page : http//www.jewishgen.org
I saw your posting and I think it is a very important aspect of our
searchings-that we identify for future generations. Unfortunately, medical
science has not been as advanced as today.,and many conditions of death were a
"match-up" or guess. This is why we must take care and keep very good family
records now. I wish you well and good health. Have you read "The Prostrate
Book" I purchased it for a friend of mine some years back; it is aa good
resource. Linda


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogy and Genetics #general

Linda Olson <lgo1@...>
 

David Lewin wrote:

I have sudddnely been thrust into interest about genetics vs. genealogy. I
am having to deal with Prostatic Cancer (thankfully discovered early with
an "improved PSA blood test" ) and the doctors all asked about my father
and grandfathers.

I am certain that our awareness has not yet reached the level where anyone
records illnesses or causes of death as part of Genealogy. Am I right?
Ought this not to be added?

David Lewin
London

MODERATOR NOTE: Genetics and genealogy has been often discussed
on this forum. To read the messages posted on this subject search
the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives, where you will find all
messages posted after September 1993. It can be accessed directly
from our home page : http//www.jewishgen.org
I saw your posting and I think it is a very important aspect of our
searchings-that we identify for future generations. Unfortunately, medical
science has not been as advanced as today.,and many conditions of death were a
"match-up" or guess. This is why we must take care and keep very good family
records now. I wish you well and good health. Have you read "The Prostrate
Book" I purchased it for a friend of mine some years back; it is aa good
resource. Linda


Nomenclature #general

Diane Frankel <dfrankel@...>
 

As a matter of interest, I wonder if anyone has an explanation as to why a
sibling of a grandparent is commonly referred to as a Great Aunt or Uncle.
I believe that that person should be a Grand Aunt or Uncle. A kinship
report on one of the computer programs seems to agree with me.

Diane Frankel
North Miami Beach, FL
dfrankel@icanect.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nomenclature #general

Diane Frankel <dfrankel@...>
 

As a matter of interest, I wonder if anyone has an explanation as to why a
sibling of a grandparent is commonly referred to as a Great Aunt or Uncle.
I believe that that person should be a Grand Aunt or Uncle. A kinship
report on one of the computer programs seems to agree with me.

Diane Frankel
North Miami Beach, FL
dfrankel@icanect.net


Reparations #general

Ellen Sattler-Harpin <EHarpin@...>
 

Shalom,
I have not seen any mention on any of the sites of Reparations paid by
Germany for losses sustained during the Holocaust. I know sometime
around the late fifites/early sixties, my grandmother received a payment
from Germany. It was about the same time that she also found she had a
brother who had survived and come to the USA and two nieces who had also
survived. We were in Los Angeles at the time, so I wonder where she
might have filed, how I could get the information on who and what she
claimed on the forms? Any suggestions would be most welcome as I'm
having a difficult time tracing back to Austria/Poland. Thanks so much.
Ellen Sattler-Harpin mailto: EHarpin@webtv.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reparations #general

Ellen Sattler-Harpin <EHarpin@...>
 

Shalom,
I have not seen any mention on any of the sites of Reparations paid by
Germany for losses sustained during the Holocaust. I know sometime
around the late fifites/early sixties, my grandmother received a payment
from Germany. It was about the same time that she also found she had a
brother who had survived and come to the USA and two nieces who had also
survived. We were in Los Angeles at the time, so I wonder where she
might have filed, how I could get the information on who and what she
claimed on the forms? Any suggestions would be most welcome as I'm
having a difficult time tracing back to Austria/Poland. Thanks so much.
Ellen Sattler-Harpin mailto: EHarpin@webtv.net


Arlene Rich, Cleveland JGS #general

Rita Permut
 

Sorry to send this via Jewishgen but two tries to the e-mail address I
have used before and both messages bounced. Arlene, please e-mail me
your address. Thank you.

Rita Permut
ritapermut@erols.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Arlene Rich, Cleveland JGS #general

Rita Permut
 

Sorry to send this via Jewishgen but two tries to the e-mail address I
have used before and both messages bounced. Arlene, please e-mail me
your address. Thank you.

Rita Permut
ritapermut@erols.com


Looking for STRAHL in Chicargo 1921- originaly from Lithuania #general

Martin Balk <martin@...>
 

I have an Affidavit of support made by an Isidel STRAHL, in the County
of Cook State of Illinois on 9th Feb. 1921.

It sates that Isidel was naturalized in Cook County Court in 1904.

In 1921 he was living 3330 w. Roosevelt Rd, City of Chicago
In this Isidel states that he is the President of Tanner - Rome Coal
Company, it then Contains details of his wealth earnings.

Then it goes on to say that he is the cousin of L. BALK aged 43 residing
in London.
The L Balk is my Grandfather Leon (Lieb) Balk.
I also have a copy of Naturalization Papers for Israel Strahl, Cook
County 1894.

If any one can help with further details of the Strahl I would be most
grateful.
A copy of the affidavit can be found on my Web Site
http://www.balk.freeserve.co.uk

Martin Balk
London UK
martin@balk.freeserve.co.uk

Seeking
BALK -Taurage/Tavrick/Tarrogen Lithuania
STRAHL Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for STRAHL in Chicargo 1921- originaly from Lithuania #general

Martin Balk <martin@...>
 

I have an Affidavit of support made by an Isidel STRAHL, in the County
of Cook State of Illinois on 9th Feb. 1921.

It sates that Isidel was naturalized in Cook County Court in 1904.

In 1921 he was living 3330 w. Roosevelt Rd, City of Chicago
In this Isidel states that he is the President of Tanner - Rome Coal
Company, it then Contains details of his wealth earnings.

Then it goes on to say that he is the cousin of L. BALK aged 43 residing
in London.
The L Balk is my Grandfather Leon (Lieb) Balk.
I also have a copy of Naturalization Papers for Israel Strahl, Cook
County 1894.

If any one can help with further details of the Strahl I would be most
grateful.
A copy of the affidavit can be found on my Web Site
http://www.balk.freeserve.co.uk

Martin Balk
London UK
martin@balk.freeserve.co.uk

Seeking
BALK -Taurage/Tavrick/Tarrogen Lithuania
STRAHL Lithuania


Re: Genealogy and Genetics #general

Stanley Diamond
 

On Sat, 21 Nov 1998, David Lewin, London, England
<davidlewin@bigfoot.com> writes:

I have sudddnely been thrust into interest about genetics vs. genealogy.
I am having to deal with Prostatic Cancer (thankfully discovered early
with an "improved PSA blood test" ) and the doctors all asked about
my father and grandfathers.
I am certain that our awareness has not yet reached the level where
anyone records illnesses or causes of death as part of Genealogy.
Am I right? Ought this not to be added?
There are very valid reasons for doing so and many genealogy software
programs provide a place to note such data. For example, the most
popular program, Family Tree Maker has a page where one can enter
"cause of death" and "medical information" as well as "height" and
"weight."

To illustrate the importance of the family information we document and
the databases that we in the Jewish genealogical world are creating,
I would like to quote an excerpt >from the Los Angeles Summer Seminar
syllibus for Jewish Records Indexing - Poland:

"JRI-Poland has been recognized by the international medical and scientific
community because of the potential benefit of the database for Ashkenazic
families trying to trace their medical histories, particularly those at
increased risk for hereditary conditions and diseases. The project has
received recognition >from investigators at the Cancer Research Center of
Albert Einstein College of Medicine - Yeshiva University, Hebrew University -
Hadassah Medical School, Epidemiology-Genetics Program - Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, McGill University - Montreal Children’s
Hospital Research Institute, McGill University - Division of Medical
Genetics,
Mount Sinai Hospital - Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Yale University
Cancer Genetics Program"

Simply stated, one never knows when, sometime in the future, it may be
vital to a member of your family to know their genetic history and/or to find
matches for bone marrow transplants, etc.

My personal genealogical efforts have enabled me to find, and warn
distant cousins that the "mild chronic anemia" with which they have
been dogged all their lives may, in fact, be an indication that they are
unsuspecting carriers of the Beta-Thalassemia trait... something virtually
unknown in Ashkenazic populations. While the trait does not affect
carriers, the danger is to future generations because the offspring of two
carriers have a one in four chance of inheriting the disease which, until
recent years, was typically fatal by the second decade.

This trait, is most often found in Greek and Italian populations and is also
known as Mediterranean Anemia,. On the other hand, until very recently,
doctors treating Ashkenazim did not consider Beta-Thalassemia as a likely
cause of the anemia. It is one reason why I am interested in making
contact with all Ashkenazic carriers of the trait and working with them to
set up programs to find and warn distant branches of their families. For
more information please refer to my website noted below.

Stanley M. Diamond, Montreal
"Genealogy with an extra reason" ... Beta-Thalassemia Research Project
Tel: (514) 484-0100 Fax: (514) 484-7306
SMSDiamond@aol.com
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/1439


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogy and Genetics #general

Stanley Diamond
 

On Sat, 21 Nov 1998, David Lewin, London, England
<davidlewin@bigfoot.com> writes:

I have sudddnely been thrust into interest about genetics vs. genealogy.
I am having to deal with Prostatic Cancer (thankfully discovered early
with an "improved PSA blood test" ) and the doctors all asked about
my father and grandfathers.
I am certain that our awareness has not yet reached the level where
anyone records illnesses or causes of death as part of Genealogy.
Am I right? Ought this not to be added?
There are very valid reasons for doing so and many genealogy software
programs provide a place to note such data. For example, the most
popular program, Family Tree Maker has a page where one can enter
"cause of death" and "medical information" as well as "height" and
"weight."

To illustrate the importance of the family information we document and
the databases that we in the Jewish genealogical world are creating,
I would like to quote an excerpt >from the Los Angeles Summer Seminar
syllibus for Jewish Records Indexing - Poland:

"JRI-Poland has been recognized by the international medical and scientific
community because of the potential benefit of the database for Ashkenazic
families trying to trace their medical histories, particularly those at
increased risk for hereditary conditions and diseases. The project has
received recognition >from investigators at the Cancer Research Center of
Albert Einstein College of Medicine - Yeshiva University, Hebrew University -
Hadassah Medical School, Epidemiology-Genetics Program - Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, McGill University - Montreal Children’s
Hospital Research Institute, McGill University - Division of Medical
Genetics,
Mount Sinai Hospital - Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Yale University
Cancer Genetics Program"

Simply stated, one never knows when, sometime in the future, it may be
vital to a member of your family to know their genetic history and/or to find
matches for bone marrow transplants, etc.

My personal genealogical efforts have enabled me to find, and warn
distant cousins that the "mild chronic anemia" with which they have
been dogged all their lives may, in fact, be an indication that they are
unsuspecting carriers of the Beta-Thalassemia trait... something virtually
unknown in Ashkenazic populations. While the trait does not affect
carriers, the danger is to future generations because the offspring of two
carriers have a one in four chance of inheriting the disease which, until
recent years, was typically fatal by the second decade.

This trait, is most often found in Greek and Italian populations and is also
known as Mediterranean Anemia,. On the other hand, until very recently,
doctors treating Ashkenazim did not consider Beta-Thalassemia as a likely
cause of the anemia. It is one reason why I am interested in making
contact with all Ashkenazic carriers of the trait and working with them to
set up programs to find and warn distant branches of their families. For
more information please refer to my website noted below.

Stanley M. Diamond, Montreal
"Genealogy with an extra reason" ... Beta-Thalassemia Research Project
Tel: (514) 484-0100 Fax: (514) 484-7306
SMSDiamond@aol.com
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/1439