Date   

Re: Israel search techniques needed #general

Kate
 

Hi!

I have one of my relatives name David Sheinis. He emigrated to NYC from Kiev. I do not have any other details. My other relatives are from Ukraine as well with last names Shutiy and Meer.

I would like to learn more about these last names and find relatives if possible.

Thanks,
Kate
katya.verner@...

 


now online: new episode of Genealogy Coffee Break from the Center for Jewish History #education

Moriah Amit
 

Starting this month, the Center for Jewish History is changing the format of our Genealogy Coffee Break series. While we will continue to produce and share a new episode each month, we will no longer air the episode live. In our May episode, we reveal our favorite tips for using FamilySearch.org. You may now view this episode and all of our previous episodes anytime on the Center for Jewish History's Facebook page or YouTube channel (closed captions are available on both). To receive updates on future episodes, please "Like" or "Follow" our Facebook page or subscribe to our YouTube channel. 
--
Moriah Amit
Senior Genealogy Librarian, Center for Jewish History
New York, NY
mamit@...


Menachem Kaiser's "Plunder" wins prestigious Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

-
Menachem Kaiser's "Plunder" has won the prestigious Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, 
an annual award that comes with a $100,000 prize.  
 
Plunder is a fascinating read for genealogists with an interest in research of records in Poland.  
As Kaiser wrote on the JRI-Poland blog "(How) data helped me solve a decades-old family puzzle | JRI-Poland"

The award follows on Plunder receiving A New York Times Critics’ Best Nonfiction Book of 2021, 
and the Canadian Jewish Literary Award for Biography. 

Although a memoir about his efforts to reclaim his family's home in Poland, it dramatically 
illustrates the importance of every record (source) and how each document can play a key
part of unraveling a family's story.  JRI-Poland is honored by Kaiser's declaration on the 
blog..."The records JRI-Poland provided were the foundation on which the narrative rests. 
And I am forever grateful."
 
The announcement of the award has appeared on multiple websites including the Jerusalem Post
Stanley Diamond, M.S.M. 
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
  
 


Re: Headstone translation request #translation

fredelfruhman
 

The Hebrew year is 5720.
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


Name Adoption Lists #names

Jonathan Rose
 

I am interested in the Name Adoption Lists. What is the status of Phase II? When will any of them be accessible on line? How do I search & access the ones listed for Phase I? I have found some on line in other sources & on the Archiv de Bas-Rhin. Thank you.

 

Jonathan Rose

 

NEW POSTAL ADDRESS & PHONE NUMBER

Jonathan Rose

Professor of Law  & Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar Emeritus

Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Arizona State University,

609 E. Carter Dr.

Tempe, AZ 85282

(480) 839-2104
mailto:Jonathan.Rose@...

Faculty Profile
SSRN Page

 


Gravestone Translation Requests #translation

SS
 

Hello All:

Please translate the Hebrew on the gravestones of my ggm and ggf. Thank you for your help.

Sandy Schepis
sanks1129@...


Re: Genealogy software? #general

Max Heffler
 

I use Brother's Kepper 7 as my master local database and geni.com as most most-up-to-date online source - a manual process. I use Family Tree Maker to backup my Ancestry.com tree and for merging duplicates. I used Family Tree Builder to backup my MyHeritage tree and for lopping off sections too disconnected from the lines I manage.

Max Heffler
Houston, TX


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Alan Ehrlich via groups.jewishgen.org <alan.ehrlich=ehrlich-online.com@...>
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2022 7:26 AM
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Genealogy software? #general
 
Of all the genealogy software packages and iterations I’ve tried over the years, my preference still goes to Brother’s Keeper 7

Information and free (trial) download at www.bkwin.com

Kind regards,
Alan Ehrlich
Geneva Switzerland

--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


Summer Camp #usa

Myrna Waters
 

My sister attended Camp Nah-Jee-Wah (NJ Jewish Y Camp) located in Milford, PA., and later on Camp Wahnee in Brandon, VT.  This was in the l960's.
--
Myrna (Slatnick) Waters
NJ/NY/FL USA

Researching:  SLEPACK (or similar) Belarus/Bialystok area; SLATNICK/SLOTNIK (or similar) Minsk/Puchovichi area of Russia from 1905/1914 to NY & Newark, NJ and Canada; KURZMANN Jaslo, Poland and Drohobych, Ukraine area (both formerly in what was the Galician area of Austria prior to WWI), KURTZMAN in NY/Bronx and NJ/Newark, SADOWSKY (or similar) from Belarus area of Russia/Bialystok 19th century to Newark, NJ 1905 or after.


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen FB page #yizkorbooks #belarus #JewishGenUpdates

Bruce Drake
 

“Immediately after they took my father, which happened in the first weeks of the German occupation, hunger knocked at our door. My mother who worked and sewed her whole life was broken after losing father. She could not advise us on how to get food…Our house was without a breadwinner.”
“Hunger,” a chapter in the Yizkor book of the vanished town of Zhetl, Belarus (known today as Dzyatlava) is about what the title says. There were many ways Jews suffered under the German occupation — brutality, extermination, rampant anti-Semitism — but this account focuses on how central the struggle for food was in the lives of Pesie Mayevsky’s family.
In their continuing, desperate search for food, the family scoured the forest for mushrooms and tried to find enough money to buy what they could. Her mother sells what she could of the children’s’ clothes and she and the children knock on farmers’ doors to take in work in exchange for something to eat. One farmer gives them a pile of frozen small potatoes in exchange for work, giving them half of what they earned, but Mayevsky writes: “A pile of frozen potatoes, a treasure in our starving home! It took a lot of suffering and self sacrifice to obtain them.”
In the ghetto, Mayevsky’s mother, brother and sister were killed. She and others ultimately escaped. But hunger pursues them.

--
Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: change of surname #names #romania

soring0412@...
 

The Romanian never required Jews by law to adopt family names. 
The text of Romanian civil laws regarding registration assumed that all had family names. There was never a law that said that all have to have surnames. 

In 1895 there was a law that required anyone who used in daily life a name or surname different than that registered in the records to  register the name/surname change. That was the only requirement - but most Jews did not bother. In fact, in 1949 the communist authorities repeated this requirement in a decree.

Sorin Goldenberg
Israel.


Re: Did you go to a Jewish summer camp? #usa

Judi Wagner
 

Wow, love this thread
my first sleep away camp experience was at Camp Westmont in 1961, I was 9.  I was not allowed to take a snake home on the bus, but I did bring a frog and salamander.  I then spent many summers at Camp B’nai B’rith in Starlight, Pa, just over border from Hancock, NY.  My first anti semitic experience was in town when the owner of a candy store did not want to serve Jewish campers.  I loved everything about sleep away camp and made many special friends.  I also worked at the camp when I was older.  It was run by the Skolnick family.  I still have many photos of all the campers and counselors, and kitchen staff, circa late 1960’s.  Wearing white, lighting a giant menorah, and Israeli dancing on Friday nights, learning sports, swimming in a lake, performing in shows, arts and crafts, a truly life changing and enriching experience.  My husband and I started dating in high school, and we worked summers at Camp Impala, and Camp Nimrod, both in Catskills.  My daughter continued the sleep away camp tradition at Camp  Blue Ridge in Georgia and loved it as well. Our three grandsons are third generation campers, going to Camp Walden in upstate NY.  How lucky are we and our families to have the Jewish camp experience!

Judi Kessel Wagner
Boca Raton, FL

KISSILEVSKIJ, and BRODY,   Berdichev Ukraine ; HIRSCHFELD, and ZEIGER,  Hodod, Romania; KLEIN and GROSZMAN, Satoraljaujhely, Hungary; WAGNER, Warsaw, Poland; WEINSTEIN, Hotin, Bessarabia; RECHTER and HALPERN, Bolekhov, Ukraine






Re: Who Am I: A TAFLOWICZ or A MINC/MINTZ? #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Hi Marilyn.   Thanks for the interesting question.   Those Tomaszow Mazowiecki records were document from the index page by JRI-Poland in 1997 and now after 25 years, I am finally putting my efforts into doing extending extracts.  The 1844 Marriage record that you mentions was indexed by the 19th Century indexer as FOLKOWICZ  but as you say the record states TAFLOWICZ. 

I suggest that you also look at the Marriage record of Estera's brother Eyzyk TAFLOWICZ in 1843 akta # 5 found at https://metryki.genbaza.pl/genbaza,detail,289965,35   In this record it states that Eyzyk is the son of Hajm and Zelda TAFLOWICZ.  Then look at the bottom of the pages where the signagures are located.  Eyzyk's signature in Hebrew is Eyzk TAFLOWICZ,  Hajm signature in Hebrew is Hajm MINTZ!   On the Polish signature side it shows Eyzyk TAFLOWICZ under that is Haym the ditto symbol under the words TAFLOWICZ and then it shows MINTZ.  Then under Haym name is Zelda's name with the ditto symbol under both TAFLOWICZ and MINTZ

So to answer your question, yes Estera TAFLOWICZ and Estera MINTZ as the same person.  

Hadassah Lipsius
lipsius@...
JRI-Poland Tomaszow Mazowiecki Town leader.  


Re: The name Ruda #names

David Shapiro
 

Tiv Gittin, a source for the forms of given names for the writing of gittin (bills of divorce), quotes,Sefer Shomos, an earlier source that he heard the name Ruda in Belgrade, and that it was the name of an specific herb. The Tiv Gittin himself that in his area (he lived in Brodie) the name and the herb are pronounced Ruta.

David Shapiro
Jerusalem


Re: Genealogy software? #general

Alan Ehrlich
 

Of all the genealogy software packages and iterations I’ve tried over the years, my preference still goes to Brother’s Keeper 7

Information and free (trial) download at www.bkwin.com

Kind regards,
Alan Ehrlich
Geneva Switzerland


Re: Headstone translation request #translation

dasw5@...
 

Shaindel Leah daughter of Moshe Alexander 
Died 11 Day of Tishrei in the year 5768

Dassy Wilen
dasw5@...


tombstone translation #translation

Malka
 

Good morning,

Here lies or here is buried (abbreviation on top)

Shindel Leah

Daughter of reb Moshe Alexander Z”L

Passed 11 Tishrei 5720

May her soul be gathered in eternal life (abbreviation below)

Shabbat shalom,

Malka Chosnek

 

 


Re: Hebrew name translation on tombstone #translation

segslusky@...
 

I’m thinking that Nathan might have chosen the name Phillips to correspond with his father’s name Pinchas/Phineas.

Susan Slusky
Highland Park, NJ


Re: Headstone translation request #translation

kosher@...
 

The translation of the gravestone is as follows:
Top line: here lies (abbr.)
2nd line: Shayndel Leah
3rd line: daughter of Mr. Moshe Alexander, may he rest in peace (abbr.)
4th line: who died on the 11th of Tishrei 5720 
Bottom line: may her soul be bound up in the bond of everlasting life (abbr.)

Keith Osher
Newton, MA


Re: The name Ruda #names

pinardpr@...
 

In several Slavic languages, like Czech, Polish, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, "ruda" means "ore."

I don't know if that has any connection to your relatives' names, but it might have depending on where they lived.

Otherwise, it can also be a nickname for Rudolf.

Rick Pinard
Prague


Re: Anglicising Czechoslovak forenames #names #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

If the children were born during the First Czechoslovak Republic (1918-38), then English was fashionable. Not very common, but fashionable nonetheless.

I have a friend born into a Jewish family in Moravia in the 1920's named Maud, for example.

Generally, speaking the authorities were very cavalier about first names during the Monarchy, Republic and so-called Protectorate -- translating into the individual German and Czech variants back and forth depending on which office and where, I suppose. That was a very odd habit, we don't usually do today.

Perhaps, using an English name avoided a Francis becoming either a Frantisek or a Franz?

Rick Pinard
Prague

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