Date   

Re: Online index or data base for DP camps after WWII? #holocaust

ntc52@...
 

I know that my mother was in Iserlohn, North Rhine, Germany, dp camp but haven't found any lists and would very much be interested to do so. She was raised RC but was actually ethnically Jewish..
I have found the following useful:
dpcamps.org/dpcampseurop.html -lists the  dp camps in Germany 
dpcamps.org/dpcampsmap  - which shows how Germany was divided into zones 1946
www.straty.pl/   fpnp.pl    search for repressed persons
arolsen /ITS tracing service
USHMM
Facebook group  'sons & daughters of displaced Poles from WW11
I hope that this helps.
Noreen Clark (Szczepanski & Mrozowska)


Re: Hebrew Translation #translation

davidmdubin@...
 

H(ere) L(ies)
the honorable (abbreviated) Gdil son of Michael
and also her (???) spouse Beyla daughter of David
May their souls be bound in the bonds of (everlasting) life (abbreviated)

the man’s name is likely misspelled and the name should be Gdalya, גדלי׳ rather than גדיל. That carelessness might also explain the error in gender on the third line.  
--
David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ


looking for information about the Schneerberg family from Pfaffenhoffen France #france

btal2000@...
 

 

Hello,

I am the descendent of  Leopold Schneeberger born in Pfaffenhoffen France, in Dec 14th 1856.

He was the son of Raphael Schneeberg born I think in 1823.

Can anyone provide more information about this Schneeberg family ?

Thanks

Benny Tal

Btal2000@...

 

נשלח מ- דואר עבור Windows

 


‭‮


Re: Hebrew Translation #translation

ramot418@...
 

The exact wording of the Hebrew is unclear to me.  However what is clear is that this inscription refers to a husband and wife: Gdal son of Micha'el, and Beila daughter of David.
-------------------------------------------------
Steve Goldberg
Jerusalem, Israel
Researching:
Sagan/Shagan family from Veliuona (Velon), Lithuania
Goldberg family from Vidukle, Lithuania
Susselovitch/Zuselovitch family from Raseiniai (Rassein), Lithuania


Re: help with Hebrew tombstone translation - #translation

ramot418@...
 

"Here lies the modest woman Chana the daughter of Tzvi Ze'ev Benderski, born 5601 (1841), died 14th of Nissan 5688" (April 4, 1928)
---------------------------------------------------------
Steve Goldberg
Jerusalem, Israel
Researching:
Sagan/Shagan family from Veliuona (Velon), Lithuania
Goldberg family from Vidukle, Lithuania
Susselovitch/Zuselovitch family from Raseiniai (Rassein), Lithuania


Help needed in contacting Rosalyn Rappel #dna #usa

Yohanan
 

Rosalyn Rappel is a match in AncestryDNA to my wife, 204cM shared with longest segment of 52cM, which looks like a significant match.
If she is related we hope to find a new branch to the family, who lost many in the Holocaust.
Unfortunately there is no reply from her to my messages via Ancestry messaging system.
Searching this name in the internet I found only one possible person name Rosalyn Rappel, in New York, but she is either in her 90s or deceased.
Possible other member of the family in the same address is William Rappel.
We appreciate any help in contacting Rosalyn or any of her family members.

Yohanan LOEFFLER
Melbourne, Australia

Researching (main surnames):
From Austria, Slovakia: LOFFLER / LEFLER, LEDERER, SCHNEIDER, NATHAN, SEELENFRIED, ZAPPERT.
From Bukowina, Galicia: MINSTER / MUNSTER, NAGEL, SCHERL, IWANIR.
From Poland / Belarus: ALTMAN, KAMINSKY, KAMINKIER, LUBETKIN, SZTARK, YOSELEWICZ, KOSLOWSKI, KRAMARZ, RAUCHFELD.


Trying to find family of US citizen living in Slovakia in Holocauar #holocaust #records #slovakia

tzipporah batami
 

MY MOTHERS FATHER WORKED WITH AN AMERICAN MARRIED TO SOMEONE IN SLOVAKIA. THIS MAN HELPED MY MOTHER AND HER FAMILY IN THE HOLOCAUST. I COULD NOT FIND RECORD IN SLOVAKIA OF HIM, AND I DONT KNOW WHAT STATE IN USA HE WAS BORN. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN AROUND 1900. WHICH US AGENCY COULD HELP WITHOUT KNOWING HIS STATE? HE WOULD PROBABPY HAVE HAD TO GET AN EXIT VISA TO LEAVE, COULD THAT BE CHECKED?

FEIGIE TEICHMAN


help with Hebrew tombstone translation - #translation

Laura Stone
 

Hello, 

Can someone translate this headstone for me? I’m not positive, but I think this may be my 3rd great-grandmother. I appreciate the help! 

Laura Stone



New Jewish DNA From 14th Century Erfurt #sephardic #dna #germany

Adam Cherson
 

If you haven't already heard, a halakhic loophole has allowed researchers to take DNA samples from 14th Century Jewish remains in Erfurt (https://twitter.com/ShaiCarmi/status/1526850050772590592).


This is an interesting day for those of us studying the topic, because the Erfurt data are the first set of samples I know of allowing for an in depth view of 14th Century, N. European Jewry.

 

According to a simple model I've formulated, the three Erfurt clusters represent: 1) Erfurt1a: older N. European Ashkenazim (perhaps descendants of the first wave of Jewish migration to the area circa 800-1100 CE); note that modern German Ashkenazim in the same cluster area as Erfurt1a, 2) Erfurt1b: a wave of migrants from Spain (many Jews were fleeing from Sepharad as early as the Granada Massacre of 1066 and after the Almohads conquered Sepharad circa 1121 until about 1269); on the scatter, Erfurt1b clusters nearby to modern Sephardim; 3) Erfurt2: this is the one that I find most fascinating because it introduces a new aspect to the history which I had not thought about until now: a wave of Jewish migrants coming from the Southern Italian Peninsula seem to have acquired Avar-Longobardic genes since the time when the Longobards and their Avar allies invaded those territories. I am not too clear on the exact historical exigencies that brought this group to N. Europe, nor when the migration may have occurred, but I believe that the data support a period of Jewish-Avar hybridization in Southern Italy (and possibly N. Italy as well) from about 650 CE until 1000 CE. Could the Avars be the answer to the riddle of Central Asian genes in the Ashkenazic population? We shall see....

 

I really don’t know too much about the Avars, besides their Uralic linguistic affinities, but I suppose they could be the vector bringing the unusual East Asian genes into the Erfurt samples, via the Longobards in S. Central Italy. According to this recent study: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.01.19.476915, the Avars received Xiongnu genes before coming into the Pannonian Plain. According to Amorim, et al, (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-06024-4) the Avars became allies of the Longobards (the sample SZ1 which is on the scatter is a later burial from a Longobard cemetery in the Pannonian area, reported in this paper). Amorim goes on to say: “the Longobard duchies of Spoleto and Benevento ruled much of the inland areas of the [Italian] peninsula…” This would have been the time of the Lombard princes Pandulf and Landulf.  It is known that Benevento was a Jewish population center during this period (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benevento#Jewish_history), so there appears to have been an opportunity for introgression.

 

I am not sure what to make of the Erfurt3s: I14897 appears to be a Sephardic-S. Italian hybrid. I13867 could be a Original Ashknenazi-S. Italian hybrid.

 

An interesting aspect of this model is that the Erfurt average point clusters with modern Eastern European Ashkenazim which suggests to me that we see in Erfurt, the ingredients which were later to become the Eastern Ashkenazim population.

 

There is much to be unraveled here and I am curious to see what models others make of these data.


--
Adam Cherson
NY, NY


(US-NYC) Jewish Theological Seminary Exhibit on Rare Ketubbots #announcements #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

 

The Forward publication has an article under culture about a new exhibit showing how Jewish marriage evolved- from 12th century -century Egypt to modern-day America. “To Build a New Home: Celebrating the Jewish Wedding” It is the first show in the Jewish Theological Seminary’s library new gallery with rare ketubbot from different centuries and continents:” from 17th and 18th century Italy; a 13th-century French religious compendium outlining marriage rituals and including a bawdy wedding poem; a fragment from a 12th-century prenuptial agreement affirming the right of the groom’s mother-in-law to live with the married couple; and from the modern era, a ketubbot making it possible for Jewish women to initiate a religious divorce.” The JTS weblink for the exhibit is: https://www.jtsa.edu/news/library-exhibit-jewish-marriage/

 

The exhibit is available from May 18-August 14, 2022.

 

Ketubots are a genealogical resource with names of parents of the bride and groom and much more. It deals with a variety of marital responsibilities-it describes the grooms rights and responsibilities towards the bride.

 

To read the Forward article see: https://tinyurl.com/murcy8zr

Original URL:

https://forward.com/culture/505916/jewish-theological-seminary-to-build-a-new-home-ketubah-jewish-weddings-museum/

Note: The Forward is a subscription periodical. It permits several free access articles per month.

 

Information on visiting the exhibit and about the exhibit is available at: https://www.jtsa.edu/news/library-exhibit-jewish-marriage/

 

The JTS is located at: 3080 Broadway (at 122nd Street), New York City

Summer library hours: Monday and Wednesday, 8:30 am – 8:00 pm, and Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 am – 7:00 pm. 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Margolioth rabbinic dynasty— Galicia #galicia #rabbinic

Dan Rottenberg
 

I recently discovered the 18th-Century Galician rabbi Yosef Margolioth, son of R. Alexander Sender Margolioth (1730?-1802), who was rabbi of Zbaraz and Satanov. I speculate that this Rabbi Yosef may be identical to my great-great-great-great-great-grandfather Joseph Margulies, who died in Zbaraz in 1828 at the age of 70.

 

Several sources have suggested that all Jews from eastern Galicia with some variation of the name Margulies/Margolioth are descended from the famous rabbinic family to which Alexander Sender Margolioth belonged. In the 1770s Alexander Sender Margolioth succeeded his father-in-law as rabbi of Zbaraz, the eastern Galicia town where five generations of my Margulies relatives lived during the 19th Century. Two nephews of my great-grandfather Louis Margulies (1864-1923) told me many years ago that some ancestor, possibly their great-grandfather, had been a rabbi.  

 

Thus I’ve spent many years searching for the connection between my Margulies ancestors and the Margolioth dynasty, which can be traced back to the Katzenellenbogens and Rashi. Yosef Margolioth strikes me as the possible missing link, but I need to know more about him to confirm this connection.    

 

R. Yosef is not mentioned among the children of Alexander Sender in Neil Rosenstein’s The Unbroken Chain. But Yosef is mentioned in a Margolioth tree by Yehudah Klausner. A Geni.com entry by Randy Schoenberg (updated 21 July 2019) calls him R. Joseph Margolioth, ABD Zmigrod, birth estimated between 1743 and 1793. According to Meir Wunder's Elef Margalit, R' Yosef Yoska, son of R' Sender of Zbaraz, was av beis din Zbarazh, and signed beis din documents in Czortkov (96 kilometers due south of Zbaraz) between 5566-5572 (1806-1812). In Wunder’s Morei Galicia, in the entry on R. Alexander Sender, Wunder mentions that Alexander’s son R. Yosef was rov of Zmygrod (succeeding his brother, Yehudah Aryeh Leibish), but makes no reference to Zbaraz. Wunder says R. Yosef was son-in-law of R' Yehoshua (no surname), who was Rosh Hakahal in Drogobycz (a town southeast of Lviv and about 200 km east of Zbaraz). R. Wunder does not give any other information on R. Yosef Yoska, either in Elef Margalit or in Meorei Galicia.

 

Does anyone know anything more about this R. Yosef Margolioth? In particular, who were his children? What was his wife’s name? Dates of his birth and death? The answers might help me determine whether he is my ancestor.

Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA
dan@...

 


Looking for feedback on Polish tourguide Tomasz Cebulski, #poland

Jake Jacobs
 

Looking for information on Polish tour guide Tomasz Cebulski. My brother contacted the Polin Museum and was put in touch with Tomasz for a day long tour of Auschwitz.  Does anybody have experience with him as a guide? As a genealogical researcher? Any suggestions on working with him?

Many thanks -

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Hebrew Translation #translation

Isabel Cymerman
 

Can someone translate the Hebrew on this grave of Goodman and Rebecca Rose?  Thank you very much in advance.
 
Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT
isabelcym@...
Searching:   CUKIERMAN, GRYNBERG, GRYNFARB, LUBELCZYK, ZABAWNY - Siedlce
                   DRONZNIK, NEMENCHINSKI, SAPOZHNIK, SOLECZNIK/SOLC, TABACZNIK - Vilna
                    CYMERMAN, KHELEMSKI, LANSKI, WYSZINSKI, ZYSKIND - Przedborz
 


Re: Brick Wall -->Epiphany -->Breakthrough #usa

Michele Lock
 

I'm glad you were able to figure out the one town was Kosava in Belarus.

What I do when I've been able to locate one town for certain, but have close relatives giving other names for their town of origin, I go to Google maps, and blow up the region around the town name, in this case Kosava. Then I look for nearby towns (actually villages) that have names in Belorussian that sound similar to the names given in documents. For instance - Lubizetz: about 10 miles east of Kosava is the village with the name Liubishchitsy. In Yiddish, the last syllable was often left off of names, and the "i" after an 'L' was usually left out. This would give the name "Lubishchits", very close to the name "Lubizetz". 

And the names Brasew and Rastonbresie: Kosava is located in the Brest region of Belarus. I think the 'Brasev' and 'bresie' are referring to Brest. And the 'Raston' part of the second name - this may refer to the town Ruzany, located about 14 miles northwest of Kosava. Ruzany did have a synagogue, according to the Jewishgen page on the town. 

I would, however, be interested in others' opinions on this matter of the town names.

--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Rabinowitz in Papile, Lithuania and Riga, Latvia
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


Re: Help with Hebrew Translation on Gravestone please #translation

shimonsporn
 

I forgot to translate the verse  from the Prophets Samuel / Shmuel A, 25: 29, that is traditionally engraved on Jewish tombstones

May his (her) soul be bound in the bundle of life

Shimon Sporn of Beit Shemesh, Israel

Researcher # 57380

Perl, Margolies, Itzkowitz, Lehrer families from Kisvarda, Fenyeslitke, Ustilug,


Re: Can't find IKG-Wien Trauungsbuch B, 1873 #austria-czech #records

David Lewin
 

At 17:20 21/06/2022, m.rind via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I have been frustrated in my attempts to find a certain IKG-Wien metrical book. GenTeam and JewishGen both have an extract of a certain marriage record from 15 May 1873 (marriage of Berthold Wilheim-Kohn and Pauline Weiss, born Tauber), which they locate in a book designated "B" at record number 282. But I cannot find a corresponding book anywhere on FamilySearch either in the catalogue of " IKG Matriken 1784-1911" (the indexed records) or in that of "IKG Matrikel, 1826-1943" (the largely unindexed records). I find Trauungsbücher with preceding and following letter designations ("A," "C," etc.) and covering the preceding and following years, but "B" and "1873" seem to be missing. I have gone through the catalogues repeatedly and can't find the corresponding book. Yet such a book must exist, because GenTeam and JewishGen both have an extract from it! I am wondering if I have a weird blind spot or if a particular book was removed from the FamilySearch catalogue for some reason. Can someone either locate the book or tell me why it is missing?

As my query is so specific, replies are probably best made by email.
--
Miles Rind
Seattle, Washington, USA


In the absence of a solution, try   https://www.ikg-wien.at/en/contact

David Lewin
London

Search & Unite attempt to help locate people who, despite the passage of so many years since World War II, may still exist "out there".
We also assist in the process of re-possession of property in the Czech Republic and Israel.
See our Web pages at https://remember.org/unite/


Re: Brick Wall -->Epiphany -->Breakthrough #usa

Moishe Miller
 

Thanks for sharing your success, especially after so many years. Have you tried researching Tillie's widower father, Benjamin, who is enumerated with Tillie in the 1920 census. He was the son of Eliezer, per the tombstone at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/143697956/benjamin-abramovitz
I would think that the "Leizer", Tillie's brother, was named for his grandfather.
--

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@...
JGFF #3391


Can't find IKG-Wien Trauungsbuch B, 1873 #austria-czech #records

m.rind@...
 

I have been frustrated in my attempts to find a certain IKG-Wien metrical book. GenTeam and JewishGen both have an extract of a certain marriage record from 15 May 1873 (marriage of Berthold Wilheim-Kohn and Pauline Weiss, born Tauber), which they locate in a book designated "B" at record number 282. But I cannot find a corresponding book anywhere on FamilySearch either in the catalogue of "IKG Matriken 1784-1911" (the indexed records) or in that of "IKG Matrikel, 1826-1943" (the largely unindexed records). I find Trauungsbücher with preceding and following letter designations ("A," "C," etc.) and covering the preceding and following years, but "B" and "1873" seem to be missing. I have gone through the catalogues repeatedly and can't find the corresponding book. Yet such a book must exist, because GenTeam and JewishGen both have an extract from it! I am wondering if I have a weird blind spot or if a particular book was removed from the FamilySearch catalogue for some reason. Can someone either locate the book or tell me why it is missing?

As my query is so specific, replies are probably best made by email.
--
Miles Rind
Seattle, Washington, USA


Re: Visiting Ukraine #galicia #ukraine

Steven Turner
 

I toured the same region that you are planning to and I highly recommend Alex Denisenko - tuagtuag@.... as a guide. He lives in Liviv. He should be able to answer all of your questions.

He is an excellent researcher also which should help you in planning your trip.

Steven S. Turner
Roslyn, NY


International Archives Day Video Produced by TsDIAL in Lviv #galicia #records #ukraine

Steven Turner
 

In honor of International Archives Day Olesia Stefayk, our Archival Advisor at TsDIAL in Lviv made this brief video on the importance of archives and how they are protecting their contents in light of the current hostilities.
We thank Olesia for this important work they are doing and for sharing this video with us.
https://youtu.be/EGzsl0UWDeY

Steven S. Turner
President, Gesher Galicia

4041 - 4060 of 673588