Date   

Re: question regarding records #records

Shelley Mitchell
 

I find the first helpful documents for immigrants is their Naturalization Petition. It includes name changes. Another is the burial records of Joseph’s parents. It might also help to get the death certificate. 


Shelley Mitchell, NYC


Sending payment to Zhytomyr State Archives #ukraine

Lina Goldberg
 

Hi there,

I've need to make a small payment to the Zhytomyr State Archives in Ukrainian currency (UAH). For some reason Wise/Transferwise will not let me make the transfer through them (they seem to be only allowing payment to personal cards in Ukraine), and none of my banks offer payments in UAH. The archives say they cannot accept payment in another currency.

Does anyone have any experience making payments to the Zhytomyr State Archives? If so, how did you do it? 

Lina

--
Lina Goldberg
thecuckootree.com


Re: Using given names to find populations of common descent #names

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
 

There is an interesting graduate student thesis on a similar topic - how Ashkenazi names were Americanized - that includes a statistical analysis of immigration records (for the Yiddish name) and censuses and city directories for the American name.  It is very dense, and I haven't read it all.  You can find it yourself at:
From Rochel to Rose and Mendel to Max: First Name Americanization Patterns Among Twentieth-Century Jewish Immigrants to the United States (cuny.edu)

I have the same question as Robert about names in Austria Hungary.  The given names Herman and Jacob and David appear frequently in the SPIELBERGER family.  But I cannot tell if it is one Spielberger family or several families that took the same surname.  Some of the families "daughtered out" so the DNA is inconclusive.

If anyone knows of an article about "Most Common Given Names" in the 19th Century, please share it!

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, Georgia, USA


Joseph Maneson town in Hungary #hungary

Marilyn Levinson
 

I am trying to read, with no luck the town in which my ancestor was born.  I have attached a copy of his declaration of intention, and wonder if any one can decipher the name of this place.  Thank you for your help.
Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Major new Andrzejewo records extraction project launched #poland #records

steven@...
 


Long-time Andrzejewo and area researchers will be pleased to learn that Jewish Records Indexing - Poland has undertaken a huge new “Phase 3” project to fully extract all Andrzejewo birth, marriage, and death records from 1826 to 1935 (births up to 1921). To carry out this major initiative, we also have acquired scans (digital images) of currently available Andrzejewo records in the Łomża branch of the Polish State Archives (up to 1910).

 

As Town Leader, it would be my pleasure to send you a full description of the project and explain how you will be able to obtain the extracts of your family records as they become available and before they go online.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Steven Zedeck

Town Leader, Andrzejewo Phase 3 extraction project


Re: DNA help #dna

Theo Rafael
 

Facebook is THE place for DNA discussions. There are quite a few groups on the subject and some very knowledgeable people. I haven't found any other forum which such breadth and depth. Even browsing existing discussions can be very helpful, and one can also pose new questions and get people's input.
As someone already mentioned, it's up to you to divulge (or not) any info about yourself on FB and you could use such an account strictly for genealogy research for instance and ignore other aspects of FB if you're so inclined. To really be in control though you need to learn the intricacies of privacy, notifications etc, it's quite a lot of detail if you start from scratch.
Good luck!

Theo Rafael


Re: DP Camps in Cyrpus #holocaust

Rose Feldman
 

Have you tried the IGRA collection? We don't have everything but we do have somethings.  Also try the JDC collection.  Remember the same name can appear with different spellings, so do to typographical errors or not understanding the pronunciation.
--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy


Re: Triangulated DNA matches and Pile-up Areas #dna

Phil Karlin
 

Given the length shorter than 7 cM, I agree it's probably not worth pursuing. I don't disagree with anything Adam or Ellen already wrote. 

That said, I don't think I've ever seen in my results a 5-way triangulation. If you drop #2 (orange) does the triangulation with the others lengthen? How about if you drop #4 (green) as well? 
I think a long shared segment in a pile-up region is still a long shared segment. It just may be from a common ancestor further back than the same size segment in a non-pile-up region, and so less predictive. 

Final thought: whether researching something is "a waste of time" depends on how much time you have and what else could you be spending it on. If the prize is big enough, the investment may be worth it, even if it's a long shot.

--
Phil Karlin
Hartford, CT USA


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #belarus

Bruce Drake
 

There is much to enjoy in “Only Memories Are Left” from the Yizkor book of Dokshytsy, Belarus. I can only compare its words to a vivid painting in its descriptions of the town and its environs.
“Sprinkled with beech trees, the road traverses the forests and the villages… There is silence and only the herdsman's flute dares interrupt the bliss… Not only the flute shatters the tranquility - A great sound suddenly is heard: " Ku ku-ku ku-ku ku-ku ku" - among the tree tops - the mockingbird… A flock of snow-white doves flying among the trees. An eye-full of blossom and new life! A new spring has conquered the land…Autumn - sheafs of standing corn - like wigwams. The smell of dry hay... And, in winter, whiteness and frost. Trees tops and house roofs covered with snow. At home - plated windows. A blazing stoked fire-place, and the windows full of blossomed frost lilies.”
The same eloquence touches stories of Disha leaving for America, the bonding of the people over the making of matzoh as Passover approaches, the joy of the children at the advent of Hannukah, young people sitting on the hay in a barn singing, "with feelings of nostalgia, warmth and love all around."
And the lament that ends the chapter after all these things have been wiped out by the Holocaust:
“In the town: streets, alleys, squares, markets, synagogues and schools. Children, boys, women, grown-ups, elderly - everything is gone to dust. Only stories are left, memories, nostalgia and a heart torn in infinite grief.”



--
Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Using given names to find populations of common descent #names

Robert Weinberg <weinberg@...>
 

Over the past 50+ years as I've pursued research on my Westphalian family I have noticed strikingly variable  patterns of first name usage in various regions within the province of Westphalia.  Since the practice of naming a newborn after a deceased relative was followed, it seems rigidly, these clusters seem to form large kindreds that are descended from common founding ancestors and may (in parallel with genetic/DNA studies) indicate relatively recent settlement and expansion of founding families 3 or 4 centuries ago.  As examples, among the men's names, the area of the Münsterland had many Leffmanns which were virtually absent in neighboring areas to the south and east, Cosmann localized in the area closer to the Rhine including the Ruhr area, Nachmann was virtually absent in most areas of Westphalia but common to the southeast, Sussmann was used almost exclusively in the northern parts of neighboring Hesse (and possibly further south)., Bendix was common in most areas of Westphalia but relatively uncommon further south, Feibes in eastern Westphalia incl. the Münsterland.  I could extend this list and have not studied women's given names because they often appear as diminutives.  I'm wondering whether any of us have ever undertaken such survey to complement the results of DNA sequencing analyses since his approach is able to associate common descent in populations of long-deceased member of these often-large kindreds.

Bob Weinberg, Brookline MA


Re: Triangulated DNA matches and Pile-up Areas #dna

Ellen
 

Lee,

I believe that I attended the same DNA workshop that you did.  I haven't had a chance to try it yet, but the instructor suggested using DNA Painter.  My understanding was that DNA Painter will automatically identify the pile-up regions so you can exclude them.    

I agree with Adam.  Even though MyHeritage is showing triangulation, if the shared segment is less than 7 cM, I would disregard it.  

Ellen 
--
Ellen Morosoff Pemrick 
Saratoga County, NY

Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)


Radymno 1849 cadastral map now on Gesher Galicia's Map Room #galicia #poland

Jay Osborn
 

We've just posted a new map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: a full-color 1849 cadastral map of the Galician town of Radymno:

https://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/radymno-1849/

Radymno today is a small town in southeastern Poland, halfway between Jarosław and the border with Ukraine, but the historical map shows that already by 1849 it had a mature town square and built features reflecting growing economic status. Redline revisions made on this copy of the map at an unknown later date (before WWI) indicate changes to building and land parcels including splits, merges, and the straightening and widening of roads. A major change hinted at in the redlines is the taming of the river which once passed just east of the town square, reduced to a narrow channel while the great San River still passes by farther to the east. To the north of the town center at the end of a narrow road, a small Jewish cemetery is seen to be evolving and growing.

This stitched digital composite map was assembled and presented in interactive format by Gesher Galicia. The original paper map is preserved by the Polish State Archive in Przemyśl. To see many more cadastral maps of Galician cities, towns, and villages, visit the Gesher Galicia Map Room:

https://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Maps Manager
Lviv, Ukraine


Origins of the Sephardic Mendoza family - Sunday Meeting #sephardic

contact@...
 

The Mendoza family of London is believed to be the largest in the Western
Sephardic diaspora, with members scattered around the world. In many
respects, it is a typical example of a poor Western Sephardic family. What
are the origins? What do we know and what do we not know? Using DNA and
archival records from Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands and England, David
Mendoza will present a speculative history of the family from pre-history to
1750s London.

David Mendoza has a background in business-to-business market research and
developing statistical models of markets. He was (then) the youngest person
elected to a committee of the UK's Market Research Society and is a Fellow
of the Royal Geographical Society. For the last few years he has worked as a
professional genealogist. With Ton Tielen he hosts the weekly Sephardic
World talks.

The meeting is on Sunday 3 July 2022 at 11am in LA, 2pm NYC, 7pm London, 8pm
Paris/Amsterdam and 9pm Jerusalem. Patrons can join us on Zoom. The link is
shared at our Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/sephardi Everyone is
welcome to join us on YouTube at:
https://www.youtube.com/SephardicGenealogyAndHistory PLEASE subscribe to the
YouTube channel. It helps us a lot and costs you nothing.

Watch our last speaker, Carol Castiel, discuss The Moroccan Jews of Cabo
Verde - Preservation of Memory. https://youtu.be/PTZzkMiH2O4

Over the last two years Sephardic World has become the leading forum for
learning about Sephardic history and genealogy. We have no commercial
sponsorship or public funding. There is no charge to attend our meetings or
to view our content. If you are not a patron and can afford it, please
consider supporting our work.

Best wishes,

David Mendoza and Ton Tielen
Sephardic Genealogical Society
https://www.sephardic.world/


Re: Alternates for first name Blimah #names

Marcel Apsel
 

Blima can be translated as Flower in English, Fleur in French, Perach, Pericha and Pircha in Hebrew.  Another yiddish variant is Bluma.

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium  


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Holocaust Exhibit at Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York City #announcements #holocaust #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

The Museum of Jewish Heritage- A Living Memorial to the Holocaust opens a new exhibit: The Holocaust: What Hate Can Do on July 1. The exhibit aims to bring the horrific history to life through hundreds of objects and survivor testimonies including many on display for the first time ever. JewishGen is an affiliate of the Museum.

 

The exhibit uses 750 original objects, photos, film, and personal stories donated by survivors and their families who settled in New York and nearby to "tell a global story through a local lens," a spokesperson from the museum said in a statement. The artifacts speak to times before, during, and after the Holocaust, including Jewish life and experiences of "legalized racism and fascism, pogroms, ghettos, mass murder, and concentration camps."

 

The exhibit also includes an audio tour narrated by several speakers, including actress Julianna Margulies. The audio tour is available to download through the free Bloomberg Connects app. https://www.bloombergconnects.org/

of which the Museum is a partner.

 

For information on the cost of tickets and more see:

https://www.travelandleisure.com/attractions/museums-galleries/new-holocaust-exhibit-new-york-city

 

You are required to sign to register in advance with your name, address and email address.

 

There is a curator talk, The Holocaust: What Hate Can Do on July 7, 2022 which is virtual. While free there is a suggested donation of $10.00.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: DNA help #dna

Michele Lock
 

I have to second the suggestion of the above Facebook group. The discussion board there is good for answering questions about the pros and cons of testing at the different DNA companies. It's also good for getting advice on how to interpret the testing results from different companies, and how to use DNA matches to find unknown relatives. 

If you are concerned about Facebook and privacy issues - I have a very lean profile on Facebook, with a fake birthday and only the town that I currently live in listed, nothing else. I'm only on the site for the Jewish genealogy groups there. 

Below is an article that the group moderator Jennifer Mendelsohn wrote about Ashkenazi Jews and DNA testing, and the issue of endogamy:
https://clevertitletk.medium.com/no-you-dont-really-have-7-900-4th-cousins-some-dna-basics-for-those-with-jewish-heritage-857f873399ff
--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Rabinowitz in Papile, Lithuania and Riga, Latvia
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


SCHÖN, SCHLEICHKORN, Łomna, Poland #poland

Yale Reisner
 

ב"ה
Dear JewishGenners:

The June 28, 2022 edition of the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza carried a legal notice from the Regional Court in Bochnia, First Civil Division, announcing that a property in the community of Łomna, Nowy Wiśnicz Township has been granted by the local governor to the County of Bochnia for its use.  The properties in question are identified as:

dz. ewid. 34/5 consisting of 0.0337 hectares, separated from the former dz. ewid. 34/1 [LWH 51] and

parcela bud. 54 [LWH 59]  

located in the community of Łomna, Nowy Wiśnicz Township.

The owners of record are:

Leisor SCHÖN
Gołda SCHÖN
Marya SCHÖN
Rachela (née MULLER) SCHÖNOWA and
Marya SCHLEICHKORN.

The Court has given the County of Bochnia permission to utilize the properties for its own purposes in return for its placing in escrow the sum of 7,832.00 Polish złotys.
That sum will be held by the Court for the period of TEN YEARS and will be paid out to those who can prove their rights to the property within that time.

Anyone contacting the Court in this matter should make reference to Docket No. I Ns 115/22.

Best wishes,

Yale J. Reisner
Warsaw, Poland
JGFF #913980

Yale J. 

Anyone contacting the Court in this matter should make reference to Docket No. I Ns 115/22.





Re: Triangulated DNA matches and Pile-up Areas #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Lee,

I'm not a 'degreed' geneticist but have been working as a private researcher for many years. What I am about to say is only my perspective based on experience. In addition to the possibility of pile-up zones, there is another aspect and that is the length of and number of triangulating segments. In your example I see a 6.6 cM segment and do not know whether this is the only one for the group.

My view is definitely in the 'more is better' camp. In my work I tend to disregard anything under 7 cM and especially if it is the only triangulating segment for the group.This is all the more so when one considers that many of the chip-reading programs use something called imputation, which is in effect a way of filling in gaps between segments to make them appear longer.

As with all genetic analysis I feel much more secure when triangulation results are supported by other evidence, both genetic and non. For example I tend to be accept smaller triangulation segments when the overall amount of matching is consistent with the degrees of relationship I am trying to prove for the various group members.

Genetic analysis is often somewhat impressionistic and I don't think anyone can say for sure that this or that segment length is or is not significant. I look at your example this way: if you remove the pile-up zone from consideration, you have a triangulation of about 2.4 cM, which is below what most people, including myself consider significant. Therefore, if this is your only evidence of common ancestry for the group I wouldn't consider this result as proof. If it is only one of several other types of evidence then it could lend a tiny bit of support to the hypothesis.

There is a blog and discussion dedicated to segment analysis which may discusses such matters as segment length and pile-ups in greater detail and may provide you with valuable information: https://segmentology.org/ You may want to re-post your question there for additional opinion and discussion.

--
Adam Cherson


LANDAN, Rabka-Zdrój, Poland #poland

Yale Reisner
 

 ב"ה

Dear JewishGenners:


The June 28, 2022 edition of the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza carried a legal notice in which the Regional Court in Nowy Targ, First Civil Division, announced that the Court, at the request of one Elżbieta Urbańczyk-Fiorucci, is seeking the heirs to a number of properties located in Rabka-Zdrój.  The properties are identified as:


dz. ewid. nr 515 [LWH 252];  nr 523 [LWH 252]; nr 527 [LWH 252]; nr 535 [KW NS2L/00011086/0]; nr 563 [KW NS2L/00011086/0]; nr 590 [LWH 172]; nr 597 [LWH 252]; nr 601 [LWH 172, 252, 756]; nr 603 [LWH 252]; nr 2715/2 [KW NS2L/00011086/0]; nr 2718 [LWH 252, KW NS2L/00011086/0]; nr 3709/1 [KW NS2L/00011080/8, KW NS2L/00010511/2], all located in Rabka-Zdrój.


The notice lists the names of nearly fifty individuals who are thought to have shares in these properties.  Of all the names listed, only one appears to be Jewish.  The Jewish co-owner is:


Chana LANDANOWA (i.e. Mrs. LANDAN).  Since Rabka-Zdrój is a spa town, Mrs. Landan might have lived in Rabka-Zdrój or might have lived elsewhere and just owned a vacation home there.  Unfortunately, the Court offers no further details about her.


If you are an heir to Mrs. Landan or you have information pertinent to this matter, the Court asks that you make contact within three months of the notice's publication.  In contacting the Court, please make reference to Docket No. I Ns 523/22.


Best wishes,


Yale J. Reisner

Warsaw, Poland

JGFF #913980

<yalereisner@...>.


Re: Searching for Riuva/Rivka/Sonia Levine or Levine #russia #belarus

Michele Lock
 

The spelling 'Riuva' is likely due to a miss-hearing; it could well be Rivka or Rifka. 

Have you looked for other persons with the surname Levine living in Northern Ireland in the early 1900s, in the town (or towns) where your great grandmother lived? It is more than likely that she lived with family when she first came to your country, and probably lived with family up until the time she married. Just be aware that Levin/Levine is a common Jewish surname, and not all persons with this name are related.

The record of a Rivka Levin born on June 6, 1895 - I would get an image the original record (whatever it is), to see if there is any more information on it that might be useful to you. 

As someone else above mentioned, there is always DNA testing. If Rivka had siblings, the great grandchildren of those siblings would be third cousins to you, and some of them might show up as DNA matches, if you and they test at the same company.
--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Rabinowitz in Papile, Lithuania and Riga, Latvia
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus

3661 - 3680 of 673445