Date   

Re: Female names Gussie and Sadie #names

Lee Jaffe
 

I did a quick survey of women with those names in my family tree who had gravestone with Hebrew inscriptions and ...

Sadye/Sadies were either Sarah,  Sheyndl, or Zelda

Gussies was consistently Gittel

--

Lee Jaffe
===============
Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod ; Roterozen / Rajgrod ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzstein) / Ternivka, Ukraine ;  Weinblatt / Brooklyn, Perth Amboy, NJ ; Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki

 


Re: Triangulated DNA matches and Pile-up Areas #dna

Lee Jaffe
 

As a belated follow-up to this discussion, I want to say that I've decided that using triangulation effectively is outside of my wheelhouse.  I've looked at the guides, taken many seminars, followed the suggested strategies, prioritized my matches, created tables and chromosome maps, and stared at tens of thousands of data points and ... nothing.  I won't go into all of the hurdles and traps I've encountered trying to establish whether or not parties share triangulated segments: generally, just because sets of segments look triangulated doesn't mean they are, and vice versa.  And, to top it off, even when you have identified sets which are triangulated, it isn't clear that they are significant.  

I'm not a naive user.  I've added hundreds of members to my family tree, prompted by DNA matches.  Yet never once has triangulation played a significant role nor has DNA made a conclusive case. Instead, I've come to think of like the game "Marco/Polo".  When you post your DNA test results, you are essentially calling out "Marco" and listening for someone else's test to respond "Polo."  You have a vague idea of distance and direction, but success ultimately does not depend on further DNA analysis, at least not alone.  Over and over, it's been a case of a match – often those which fall below the thresholds experts recommend – highlighting a person whose family surnames or town name or some other clue suggest further examination.  Then it's a matter of cooperation, sharing trees or offering to ask an aunt who might remember ... and one day they send you a photo of a mutual great-great-grandparent.  (It's happened, more than one, really.)  But without the cooperation, all the DNA evidence has gotten me nowhere.  


Lee Jaffe
===============
Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod ; Roterozen / Rajgrod ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzstein) / Ternivka, Ukraine ;  Weinblatt / Brooklyn, Perth Amboy, NJ ; Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki

 


JGS of Santa Cruz invites you to New Strategies in German Jewish Research with Karen Franklin : #announcements #records #dna of Santa Cruz invites you- Researching Eastern European Jewish Surnames with Alexander Beider, PhD. Sunday, July 17, 1pm Pacific Time- #announcements #records #dna #events #education

Leah Kushner
 

Santa Cruz Jewish Genealogy Society

Events: New Strategies in German Jewish Research 


Guest RSVP: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=2FNZPZC7GFHYG


Register or Contact us: Membership@...

Speaker: Karen Franklin, Professional Genealogist

Sunday, August 14, 2022 , 1 pm Pacific Time

Description:  In this talk, Karen identifies creative strategies for Jewish genealogical research that could be of interest to all genealogists regardless of the locations they are researching. She will describe how to utilize Leo Baeck Institute collections–including methodologies for exploring women’s stories — and will discuss the German Jewish DNA group, Facebook groups, the International German Genealogy Partnership (IGGP), databases on JewishGen, the Obermayer Awards, and many other resources.

About Karen Franklin

Karen S. Franklin is Director of Family History at Leo Baeck Institute and a Consultant for the Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. She has served as chair of the Council of American Jewish Museums, the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies, the Memorial Museums Committee of the International Council of Museums (ICOM), and as co-chair of the Board of Governors of JewishGen.org. A co-founder of the Obermayer German Jewish History Awards, she is currently on the board of the Southern Jewish Historical Society and is co-editor of the Memoirs Section of Southern Jewish History. Karen is the recipient of the 2018 IAJGS Lifetime Achievement Award.

Non-Members pay $5, Zoom link will be sent the week of the event. Members automatically receive a free Zoom link.


Zoom link will be sent to your email the week of the event, please check your Spam folder.

For more information or membership information

membership@...

Visit Our Website: SCJGS.org

co-sponsor- Chadeish Yameinu

Leah Kushner, President SCJGS



Re: 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐆𝐞𝐧 𝐅𝐮𝐭��𝐫𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐅𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 - 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩 #JewishGenUpdates #poland

Terry Ashton
 

What a poignant account of Eric's reflections of day 3, Warsaw, Majdanek and Lublin. I was very moved by the account.

Ms Terry Ashton, Australia
PRASHKER-Kalisz; SZUMOWSKI/SHUMOFSKY-Lomza & London; WEINGORT-Poland; WIERZBOWICZ-Poland; GOLDMAN-Blaszki; SEGAL-SEGALOVITCH-Vilna; GOLTZ-Latvia; ABRAHAMOVICH-Latvia




From: main@... <main@...> On Behalf Of Avraham Groll
Sent: Friday, 22 July 2022 4:53 AM
To: main@...
Subject: [Special] [JewishGen.org] 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐆𝐞𝐧 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐅𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 - 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩 #JewishGenUpdates #poland

𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐆𝐞𝐧 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐅𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 - 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩
𝑊𝑒 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑛𝑒𝑑 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑎𝑓𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑎 ℎ𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑙𝑦 𝑠𝑢𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑓𝑢𝑙 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ𝐺𝑒𝑛 𝐹𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑆𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝐹𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑝 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑚, 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑑𝑢𝑐𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑖𝑛 𝑝𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑝 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝐹𝑟𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝐻𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑡𝑎𝑔𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑎𝑡𝑧𝑒𝑣𝑎ℎ 𝐹𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑑𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝐼𝑛𝑐.
𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑚 𝑖𝑠 𝑑𝑒𝑠𝑖𝑔𝑛𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑖𝑛𝑠𝑝𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏𝑒𝑔𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑓𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑑𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑛𝑣𝑜𝑙𝑣𝑒𝑚𝑒𝑛𝑡. 𝐹𝑜𝑐𝑢𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑜𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑤𝑒 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑘 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑙𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑏𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑐 𝑡𝑜𝑜𝑙𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙 𝑠𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑐ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑜𝑛𝑐𝑒 ℎ𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑚𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑛 ℎ𝑎𝑙𝑓 𝑜𝑓 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑙𝑑 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑟𝑦, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑠ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑜𝑟𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑔𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑠ℎ𝑎𝑝𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑦 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑓𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒.
𝑆𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑊𝑒𝑑𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝐽𝑢𝑙𝑦 20𝑡ℎ, 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝐹𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑝𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝑎 𝑑𝑎𝑦-𝑏𝑦-𝑑𝑎𝑦 𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑎𝑝 (𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑜𝑛𝑎𝑙 𝑟𝑒𝑓𝑙𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛𝑠) 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑟𝑙𝑤𝑖𝑛𝑑 10-𝑑𝑎𝑦 𝑡𝑟𝑖𝑝.
𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑: 𝐖𝐚𝐫𝐬𝐚𝐰, 𝐌𝐚𝐣𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐤, 𝐋𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧
𝐁𝐲 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐮𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐤
Thursday marked the first full day that all eight Fellows and our respective group leaders were together and able to collectively experience a more in-depth context of what it means to be a Polish Jew; how we got here, how we grew, how we acclimated to non-Jewish rulership, how we became a resilient people, how we navigate the present, and how we can work towards a more inclusive future.
While our tour of the Majdanek concentration and extermination camp seemed to become the main talking point of the next several days, our day began in Warsaw with an amazing visit to the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. A striking architectural gesture to the history of Polish Jews, the POLIN Museum is located in what was once a thriving Jewish district, the district that was eventually demarcated as the Warsaw Ghetto. The POLIN Museum provides a forum to establish a connection between the history of the Jewish people and Poland, curating difficult histories in a way that can be understood by children and adults alike.
I won’t recap every exhibit and artifact that the POLIN Museum offered, but I will emphasize that the museum’s use of historical narrative, artifacts, and interactive exhibits helped to curate the history of Polish Jews from the pre-medieval era to present, providing a context that enforces the fact that Jewish history is Polish history. Jews were integral in the settlement, construction, and growth of cities and towns throughout Poland, finding balance between civic life and religious practice. I found it quite inspiring that the museum focused on the genealogical story and cultural growth of Polish Jews, and despite a chronic history of exclusion and exile, the museum perpetuated a story about resilience and growth rather than defeat. Even more apt is that the museum’s research center actively connects with the Jewish community to maintain and preserve both the historical and contemporary Jewish story.
The POLIN Museum provided a historical context that strengthened our sense of belonging in our ancestral lands, but our “new” perceptions were soon to be challenged. We departed sunny Warsaw for Lublin, and several hours later the lifeless fields and remaining barbed wire fence of Majdanek appeared on the horizon, creating a stark contrast to its otherwise suburban context. This concentration turned extermination camp was not hidden or remote, but it was in clear sight of its residential neighbors. As a site of memorialization and learning, The State Museum at Majdanek is unique in that it remains as one of the most well preserved concentration turned extermination camps in Poland, providing tangible evidence to the atrocities committed to both Jews and non-Jews during the Shoah.
Personally, I did not know what to expect upon our arrival at Majdanek as this was the first concentration camp that my grandfather was sent to. When he arrived in the summer of 1943, he had already been separated from his family and survived both the Grodno and Bialystok Ghetto’s. Would I be upset, angry, or hopeful? Would tears come to my eyes because of the torture my grandfather endured or would I rejoice in knowing he survived and I could now honor his memory by walking as a free Jew in Poland? What about the others, those who were not given a chance at life and instead were sent directly to the gas chambers? How would I sympathize with those who I did not know, despite the fact that a majority of my family suffered a similar fate at other extermination camps?
Our entry through the main gates was rather tranquil; a Soviet-era concrete memorial cantilevers over a stone plinth, but this is not how the victims entered the camp. Victims were transported via train, dropped off at a platform near the Flugplatz camp (a local airfield), and forced to march several kilometers to the sorting square at the camp. Hardly a traditional European square, this small plot of land beside the processing barracks was the first step in determining whether you were disinfected and sent to a “living barrack” or detained to be executed by rifle or gas chamber. The intense emotions of this moment overcame me yet I chose to hold my composure, picturing my grandfather on these very grounds 79 years to the month. Despite the weather being overcast, the heat of the sun still cut through the clouds; did he experience the same sensations? Did he know if he would feel sunshine ever again?
Once sorted, victims would be sent to the processing barracks; females to the left and males to the right. Upon entering the processing barrack, his story came to life; the rooms where possessions were removed and prisoners shaved, followed by the disinfecting baths and showers. I remember his descriptions of how the disinfectant burned his eyes, how the showers blasted extremely hot water followed by extremely cold. How could this be real? How could one human devise a plan so inhumane and convince others to implement it? How did my grandfather and others survive? Could he — or any of the survivors — foresee that their kin would return to this very spot, 79 years later? Imagine if they knew at that very moment that, in the future, their kin would return as academics and intellectuals, seeking the truth, reconciliation, and healing. While this perspective provides hope, those that were deemed incapable of work were sent further into the barrack. An exit at the rear led to a brief moment of fresh air, quickly followed by entry into the concrete chambers where Zyklon B and carbon monoxide would be used to asphyxiate men, women, and children.
While it is inevitable that structures were modified and reconstructed in order to maintain a more accurate depiction of Majdanek, the flora and fauna — native plantings, trees, birds, etc — remain untouched. Perhaps that’s what was most painful yet inspiring; seeing the cabbage like weeds my grandfather picked for added sustenance, juxtaposed with the white and lavender perennials that inevitably come back year after year, regardless of war or peace. The work barracks have since been converted as exhibition spaces, and the living barracks of Field Three are preserved to depict the inhumane living conditions endured — barracks meant for 250 often housed up to 1000. By the time we arrived at the crematorium our group had begun to reflect individually; some of us were reticent, others mournful, and a few seeking more answers. For me, the crematorium was a reminder that the Shoah was an attempt to completely eliminate any evidence of Jews — as well as millions of non-Jews — from the historical timeline, yet there was a poetic moment; if one made it to the crematorium, they no longer had to suffer.
At the conclusion of the tour there was a memorial to the 18,400 Jews of Lublin and Majdanek murdered during the “harvest festival” in November of 1943, a fraction of the 42,000 murders that occurred in the region within the two-day span — my grandfather was transferred from Majdanek to Blizyn two months earlier by chance. The topographic depressions of the mass graves and the brutalist architecture of the Mausoleum Memorial — a semi-domed concrete structure covering a mound of ashes — remain as markers to indicate the final resting place for those that were unjustly murdered. Their voices were taken, but we can — and must — preserve their memory.
𝐀𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐮𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐤
Eric Joshua Resnick is pursuing a dual degree in historic preservation and architecture at the University of Maryland. This is his second career path as his original career was in concert production. He currently resides outside of Washington, DC but is originally from Atlantic City, New Jersey. He grew up very close to his Grandfather and has always sought ways to learn more about his lineage, especially as a Jewish American with ancestry in Poland. Outside of academics and professional life, he enjoys spending time outside, playing music, attending concerts and baseball games, trying new cuisine, and exploring the DC region with his partner and dog.
𝐂𝐡𝐞𝐜𝐤 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟒 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩.
Some photos are https://photos.app.goo.gl/3CroABG8DZYd1Jyv5
Attachments:
https://groups.jewishgen.org/g/main/attachment/670477/0
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Re: Help finding marriage record #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Shalom Yoav:

I am JRI-Poland's long time Bialystok Area Coordinator. Let me first provide you and other members of this group a full listing of all the Bialystok Jewish Vital Records that have been indexed and online for you all to search. 

Births: 1835, 1839, 1846, 1848, 1855-1866, 1869, 1871-1872, 1874-1875, 1877-1884, 1886, 1888-1905

Marriages: 1835, 1854, 1856-1905

Deaths: 1835, 1846, 1852, 1854-1877, 1879-1882, 1884-1886, 1888-1890, 1892-1894, 1897-1900, 1902-1905

As you can see all the marriage records from 1865 to 1875 have been indexed by professional archivists in Bialystok. The images of most or all these records are at the szukajwarchiwach link from your posting. 

I searched our marriage indices for all the years and found no marriage of Yissaschar Dov Ber Goldberg and Reizel nee Katz. 

I suggest to you that this couple were married in another town, likely the town of residence of the bride. If uou believe this was Bialystok, then they were likely married in a nearby town. I am 99.9% convinced that the JRI-Poland indexing team indexed all the marriage records from this period.

I wish you success in your search. If you have more information to share, please communicate to me privately. 

Best regards,
Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland Bialystok Area Coordinator


On 2022-07-21 6:38 pm, aaran1286@... wrote:

Shalom, 

I am looking for the marriage record of my ancestors: 

Yissaschar Dov Ber Goldberg* (and)
Reizel nee Katz 

It took place probably between 1865-1875. 

It has not been indexed on JRI Poland, so I was wondering if the original paper might be somewhere here: https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/en/zespol?p_p_id=Zespol&p_p_lifecycle=1&p_p_state=normal&p_p_mode=view&_Zespol_javax.portlet.action=zmienWidok&_Zespol_nameofjsp=jednostki&_Zespol_id_zespolu=122447

If anyone could find the document, that would be greatly appreciated. 

Thank you very much. 

Kol tuv, 

Yoav Aran 
London

* Yissaschar Dov Ber was born Bramson, so -- although unlikely -- he may appear as Bramson name, not Goldberg. His first name in Polish records is usually "Ber" or "Berkow". 


JewishGen announces "The Weekly News Nosh"...a weekly e-newsletter from JewishGen.org #announcements #JewishGenUpdates

Phil Goldfarb
 

We are saddened to hear that Gary Mokotoff, one the "founding fathers" of Jewish genealogy, has retired his weekly ezine - Nu? What’s New? For many years, thousands of readers looked forward to his weekly email, which contained commentary, announcements, interesting tidbits, links to various articles, resources, and information of interest to the Jewish genealogical community.


In Gary's honor, and as a tribute to his devotion and dedication, JewishGen will attempt to follow in his footsteps, and publish our own free weekly update going forward. Called The Weekly News Nosh It will be e-mailed each week to JewishGen.org and JewishGen Discussion Group subscribers and edited by Phil Goldfarb, President of the JGS of Tulsa, Lead Moderator of the JewishGen Discussion Group, and member of the JewishGen Leadership Team. For the past ten years Phil has edited a similar weekly newsletter for his Genealogy Society containing information of interest to Jewish Genealogists.


Phil has spoken at several IAJGS Conferences, as well as individual JGS meetings, both nationally and internationally and has given over 2,000 presentations in his health care communications career. A 4th generation pharmacist by profession, he is the founding President of the JGS of Tulsa in 2005, has served as a member and Chairman of the IAJGS Awards Committee, has written two books, and in 2020 won an Emmy Award as a co-producer for best Historical Documentary titled: L’dor V’dor, Generation to Generation: A History of Tulsa’s Jewish Community.  He also writes a monthly column for the Tulsa Jewish Review, many of which have been picked up by news outlets around the world.

We envision this newsletter to be somewhat similar to Nu? What’s New? but besides containing Jewish Genealogy news, it will also contain new stories and links about Jewish History and Culture which is also of interest to Jewish Genealogists. Our hope is that it will be educational, interesting, and fun at the same time.


It is our hope that you will enjoy our free Weekly News Nosh which will start next week and spread the word about it!

 

 

 


Female names Gussie and Sadie #names

Yohanan
 

Any suggestions what Female Hebrew names could be associated with the name Gussie, born 1867, and with her mothre's name, Sadie, both born in Russia?
--
Yohanan LOEFFLER
Melbourne, Australia

Researching (main surnames):
From Austria, Slovakia: LOFFLER / LEFLER, LEDERER, SCHNEIDER, NATHAN, SEELENFRIED, ZAPPERT.
From Bukowina, Galicia: MINSTER / MUNSTER, NAGEL, SCHERL, IWANIR.
From Poland / Belarus: ALTMAN, KAMINSKY, KAMINKIER, LUBETKIN, SZTARK, YOSELEWICZ, KOSLOWSKI, KRAMARZ, RAUCHFELD.


Seeking Katzenellenbogens #belarus

Deb Katz
 

I'm looking for living male descendants of a Katzenellenbogen (or any variant) lineage who  traces to Katzenellenbogen in the Minsk region of modern Belarus.  The person DOES NOT need to have the tradition of descent from the Maharam of Prague (via Saul Wahl Katzenellenbogen)---in fact, it would be just as well if they do not have this tradition.  
 
I'm hoping to find someone as described above who might be willing to take a Y-chromosome DNA test (which I will pay for) as part of a research project on a major YDNA cohanim lineage where there is a significant subgroup of Nelson/Katznelson/Katzenellenbogens.   
 
To keep this short I've left out a lot of detail...if interested and it seems relevant, please contact me via email below and I can fill you in. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
Deb Katz
Pacific Beach CA USA
Genetic Genealogy Maven

--
Deb
aka Debra Katz
Pacific Beach CA USA
dnadeb@...


Help finding marriage record #poland

aaran1286@...
 

Shalom, 

I am looking for the marriage record of my ancestors: 

Yissaschar Dov Ber Goldberg* (and)
Reizel nee Katz 

It took place probably between 1865-1875. 

It has not been indexed on JRI Poland, so I was wondering if the original paper might be somewhere here: https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/en/zespol?p_p_id=Zespol&p_p_lifecycle=1&p_p_state=normal&p_p_mode=view&_Zespol_javax.portlet.action=zmienWidok&_Zespol_nameofjsp=jednostki&_Zespol_id_zespolu=122447

If anyone could find the document, that would be greatly appreciated. 

Thank you very much. 

Kol tuv, 

Yoav Aran 
London

* Yissaschar Dov Ber was born Bramson, so -- although unlikely -- he may appear as Bramson name, not Goldberg. His first name in Polish records is usually "Ber" or "Berkow". 


Finding Passport Document from Riga (Livland and Jalgava, (Courland )Provinces and 1890-1910 #latvia #records

DBarany
 

Dear Colleagues

 

I am looking for passport and/or traveling papers for my Great Grandmother (arrival 1906). I believe she may be from Riga.  
I am looking for passport and or traveling papers for my Great Great Aunt (arrival est 1899-1904). I believe her last known residence was Jelgava (Mitau). 

Searches on Ancestry, Family Search, and Jewish Gen yielded nothing- perhaps I have the wrong search terms?
Or perhaps I need to find additional archives?

Thank you all for your help and guidance,
Deborah Barany
--
Deborah Barany
deborahbarany@...


𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐆𝐞𝐧 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐅𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 - 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩 #JewishGenUpdates #poland

Avraham Groll
 

𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐆𝐞𝐧 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐅𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 - 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩
𝑊𝑒 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑛𝑒𝑑 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑎𝑓𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑎 ℎ𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑙𝑦 𝑠𝑢𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑓𝑢𝑙 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ𝐺𝑒𝑛 𝐹𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑆𝑐ℎ𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝐹𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑝 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑚, 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑑𝑢𝑐𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑖𝑛 𝑝𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑝 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝐹𝑟𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝐻𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑡𝑎𝑔𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑎𝑡𝑧𝑒𝑣𝑎ℎ 𝐹𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑑𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝐼𝑛𝑐.
𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑚 𝑖𝑠 𝑑𝑒𝑠𝑖𝑔𝑛𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑖𝑛𝑠𝑝𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏𝑒𝑔𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑓𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑑𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑛𝑣𝑜𝑙𝑣𝑒𝑚𝑒𝑛𝑡. 𝐹𝑜𝑐𝑢𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑜𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑤𝑒 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑘 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑙𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑏𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑐 𝑡𝑜𝑜𝑙𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙 𝑠𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑐ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑛 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑜𝑛𝑐𝑒 ℎ𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑚𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑛 ℎ𝑎𝑙𝑓 𝑜𝑓 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑙𝑑 𝐽𝑒𝑤𝑟𝑦, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑠ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑜𝑟𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑔𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑠ℎ𝑎𝑝𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑔𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑜𝑔𝑦 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑓𝑢𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑒.
𝑆𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑊𝑒𝑑𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝐽𝑢𝑙𝑦 20𝑡ℎ, 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝐹𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑝𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑖𝑠ℎ 𝑎 𝑑𝑎𝑦-𝑏𝑦-𝑑𝑎𝑦 𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑎𝑝 (𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑜𝑛𝑎𝑙 𝑟𝑒𝑓𝑙𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛𝑠) 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑟𝑙𝑤𝑖𝑛𝑑 10-𝑑𝑎𝑦 𝑡𝑟𝑖𝑝.
𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟑: 𝐖𝐚𝐫𝐬𝐚𝐰, 𝐌𝐚𝐣𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐤, 𝐋𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧
𝐁𝐲 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐮𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐤
Thursday marked the first full day that all eight Fellows and our respective group leaders were together and able to collectively experience a more in-depth context of what it means to be a Polish Jew; how we got here, how we grew, how we acclimated to non-Jewish rulership, how we became a resilient people, how we navigate the present, and how we can work towards a more inclusive future.
While our tour of the Majdanek concentration and extermination camp seemed to become the main talking point of the next several days, our day began in Warsaw with an amazing visit to the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. A striking architectural gesture to the history of Polish Jews, the POLIN Museum is located in what was once a thriving Jewish district, the district that was eventually demarcated as the Warsaw Ghetto. The POLIN Museum provides a forum to establish a connection between the history of the Jewish people and Poland, curating difficult histories in a way that can be understood by children and adults alike.
I won’t recap every exhibit and artifact that the POLIN Museum offered, but I will emphasize that the museum’s use of historical narrative, artifacts, and interactive exhibits helped to curate the history of Polish Jews from the pre-medieval era to present, providing a context that enforces the fact that Jewish history is Polish history. Jews were integral in the settlement, construction, and growth of cities and towns throughout Poland, finding balance between civic life and religious practice. I found it quite inspiring that the museum focused on the genealogical story and cultural growth of Polish Jews, and despite a chronic history of exclusion and exile, the museum perpetuated a story about resilience and growth rather than defeat. Even more apt is that the museum’s research center actively connects with the Jewish community to maintain and preserve both the historical and contemporary Jewish story.
The POLIN Museum provided a historical context that strengthened our sense of belonging in our ancestral lands, but our “new” perceptions were soon to be challenged. We departed sunny Warsaw for Lublin, and several hours later the lifeless fields and remaining barbed wire fence of Majdanek appeared on the horizon, creating a stark contrast to its otherwise suburban context. This concentration turned extermination camp was not hidden or remote, but it was in clear sight of its residential neighbors. As a site of memorialization and learning, The State Museum at Majdanek is unique in that it remains as one of the most well preserved concentration turned extermination camps in Poland, providing tangible evidence to the atrocities committed to both Jews and non-Jews during the Shoah.
Personally, I did not know what to expect upon our arrival at Majdanek as this was the first concentration camp that my grandfather was sent to. When he arrived in the summer of 1943, he had already been separated from his family and survived both the Grodno and Bialystok Ghetto’s. Would I be upset, angry, or hopeful? Would tears come to my eyes because of the torture my grandfather endured or would I rejoice in knowing he survived and I could now honor his memory by walking as a free Jew in Poland? What about the others, those who were not given a chance at life and instead were sent directly to the gas chambers? How would I sympathize with those who I did not know, despite the fact that a majority of my family suffered a similar fate at other extermination camps?
Our entry through the main gates was rather tranquil; a Soviet-era concrete memorial cantilevers over a stone plinth, but this is not how the victims entered the camp. Victims were transported via train, dropped off at a platform near the Flugplatz camp (a local airfield), and forced to march several kilometers to the sorting square at the camp. Hardly a traditional European square, this small plot of land beside the processing barracks was the first step in determining whether you were disinfected and sent to a “living barrack” or detained to be executed by rifle or gas chamber. The intense emotions of this moment overcame me yet I chose to hold my composure, picturing my grandfather on these very grounds 79 years to the month. Despite the weather being overcast, the heat of the sun still cut through the clouds; did he experience the same sensations? Did he know if he would feel sunshine ever again?
Once sorted, victims would be sent to the processing barracks; females to the left and males to the right. Upon entering the processing barrack, his story came to life; the rooms where possessions were removed and prisoners shaved, followed by the disinfecting baths and showers. I remember his descriptions of how the disinfectant burned his eyes, how the showers blasted extremely hot water followed by extremely cold. How could this be real? How could one human devise a plan so inhumane and convince others to implement it? How did my grandfather and others survive? Could he — or any of the survivors — foresee that their kin would return to this very spot, 79 years later? Imagine if they knew at that very moment that, in the future, their kin would return as academics and intellectuals, seeking the truth, reconciliation, and healing. While this perspective provides hope, those that were deemed incapable of work were sent further into the barrack. An exit at the rear led to a brief moment of fresh air, quickly followed by entry into the concrete chambers where Zyklon B and carbon monoxide would be used to asphyxiate men, women, and children.
While it is inevitable that structures were modified and reconstructed in order to maintain a more accurate depiction of Majdanek, the flora and fauna — native plantings, trees, birds, etc — remain untouched. Perhaps that’s what was most painful yet inspiring; seeing the cabbage like weeds my grandfather picked for added sustenance, juxtaposed with the white and lavender perennials that inevitably come back year after year, regardless of war or peace. The work barracks have since been converted as exhibition spaces, and the living barracks of Field Three are preserved to depict the inhumane living conditions endured — barracks meant for 250 often housed up to 1000. By the time we arrived at the crematorium our group had begun to reflect individually; some of us were reticent, others mournful, and a few seeking more answers. For me, the crematorium was a reminder that the Shoah was an attempt to completely eliminate any evidence of Jews — as well as millions of non-Jews — from the historical timeline, yet there was a poetic moment; if one made it to the crematorium, they no longer had to suffer.
At the conclusion of the tour there was a memorial to the 18,400 Jews of Lublin and Majdanek murdered during the “harvest festival” in November of 1943, a fraction of the 42,000 murders that occurred in the region within the two-day span — my grandfather was transferred from Majdanek to Blizyn two months earlier by chance. The topographic depressions of the mass graves and the brutalist architecture of the Mausoleum Memorial — a semi-domed concrete structure covering a mound of ashes — remain as markers to indicate the final resting place for those that were unjustly murdered. Their voices were taken, but we can — and must — preserve their memory.
𝐀𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐄𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐡𝐮𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐤
Eric Joshua Resnick is pursuing a dual degree in historic preservation and architecture at the University of Maryland. This is his second career path as his original career was in concert production. He currently resides outside of Washington, DC but is originally from Atlantic City, New Jersey. He grew up very close to his Grandfather and has always sought ways to learn more about his lineage, especially as a Jewish American with ancestry in Poland. Outside of academics and professional life, he enjoys spending time outside, playing music, attending concerts and baseball games, trying new cuisine, and exploring the DC region with his partner and dog.
𝐂𝐡𝐞𝐜𝐤 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟒 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐩.
Some photos are available here.


Re: Avotaynu Inc is closing its doors #announcements

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

A heartfelt thank you to Gary and Sallyann for the enormous help you and Avotaynu have been to us for so many years. You have indeed made a difference and will be missed.
Connie Fisher Newhan
#1272


Re: JewishGen Genetic Genealogy Class: Creating a Genetic Testing Strategy July 31-August 8 #dna #education #JewishGenUpdates

L Fagan
 

Based on several emails that I have received, I wanted to clarify that if you have already tested at a few genetic genealogy sites that it is ok to join the introductory course.  Part of the content of the introductory course is about how and why to move the genetic data to other sites and which of the other types of DNA tests to consider to obtain more information.  The advanced course (to be taught in the Fall) goes into how to analyze the matches.

Dates: July 31 - August 8th.
Registration at:  https://jewishgen.org/education/edu-courses.asp

Lawrence Fagan, Instructor  -- Email:  Larryjg1@... for
questions about the course.
 
 


White Passport for Leib Shrubishky #lithuania #records

Annette Cohen
 

I’m trying to get a copy of the white passport issued on 15 Dec 1910 to my grandfather, Leib Srubishky, aka Louis Srubiski (and, later, Louis Cohen). 
 
According to the record in the All Lithuania Revision List Database, the Passport Issuance Record is KRA/I-210/1/645.
 
I’ve emailed and re-emailed both “lcva” and “Kaunas” @ archyvai.lt, as was suggested to me, but it’s been months, and neither has responded. 
 
Any other suggestions for finding what I’m after?
 
Annette Cohen
—————
Researching SrubiskiSchwartzbergTorf in Lithuania and KutlerKorsoverWeinerGoltzzekerTeitelman in Ukraine

 


Re: Avotaynu Inc is closing its doors #announcements

Madeleine Isenberg
 

I, too, add my regrets at this closing but also thank Sallyann and Gary for their help and encouragement for the couple of pieces I managed to contribute over the years.

All good things seem to have to come to an end we will all feel that loss.

Out best wishes as you move on.
--
Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@...
Beverly Hills, CA
 
Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLÜCKSMAN, STOTTER in various parts of Galicia, Poland
(Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno, Lapuszna, Krakow, Ochotnica) who migrated into Kezmarok or
nearby towns in northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had businesses in Moravska Ostrava);
GOLDSTEIN in Sena or Szina, Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva and Tokaj, Hungary.
GOLDBERG, TARNOWSKI in Chmielnik and KHANISHKEVITCH in Kielce, Poland


Polish translation #translation

Stuart
 

Subj: ViewMate translation request - Polish

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM99255
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Stuart Lichtman


Re: ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

# AGE/GENDER WHO PERFORMED THE RITE OF CIRCUITION DATE AND MONTH MAIN ACTS AND RECORDS, OBLIGATIONS OF PARTNERS AND THEIR WITNESSES WHO IS MARRIED AND WITH WHOM, AS WELL AS THE NAMES AND STATUS OF THE PARENTS
MALE FEMALE CHRISTIAN JEWISH
151 20 31 ASSISTANT OF THE RENEIV RABBI AUGUST, 5 ELUL, 3 RECORDING ACCORDING TO THE LAW OF MOSES, KTUBA 8 THOUSAND RUBLES SINGLE, TELSHEVSKIY BOISHER, YOSEL GABRIEL-GERSHONOVICH VOLPERT WITH A DAMSEL, THE DAUGHTER OF RENAE MERCHANTS, ARONOV-ASHEROV ZUKER
TRANSLATED BY MICHAEL RYABINKY
Boynton Beach, FL


ViewMate translation request - Hungarian #translation #hungary

starrbrt@aol.com
 

Hello!

I posted a marriage record and a death record in Hungarian on ViewMate, and I'm hoping to get a translation of the portions that I highlighted on those records. The records are viewable at the following addresses:


Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much!!!

Best regards,
Wendy Starr


Re: Searching for Dr Fenyves Zoltán and family #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Jason,
Those look like street names.  Of what town?
Fenyves is a Hungarian name, and people were known to have "Magyarized" their names.  Attached is an extraction from the "Hungarian Book of Name Changes 1800-1893", that shows what the previous names were.  Other members of the family may not have changed their names, so this might help.  You can see the given name also of the person who had initiated the change and sometimes other family members; there is the document number and a two digit year at the end, corresponding to the year that the change was made.

In addition, some years ago, I had an exchange of emails with a woman, "Katinka" in New Zealand, who was also searching for her family name of FENYVES.

And one more thing, about 8 years ago, I told her I had come across a tombstone in Los Angeles (where I live) of a FENYVES.  I added this to findagrave.com: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/156335894/ernesto-fenyves

Hope some of this helps!



--
Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@...
Beverly Hills, CA
 
Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLÜCKSMAN, STOTTER in various parts of Galicia, Poland
(Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno, Lapuszna, Krakow, Ochotnica) who migrated into Kezmarok or
nearby towns in northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had businesses in Moravska Ostrava);
GOLDSTEIN in Sena or Szina, Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva and Tokaj, Hungary.
GOLDBERG, TARNOWSKI in Chmielnik and KHANISHKEVITCH in Kielce, Poland


Re: Please assist with headstone translation #translation

davidmdubin@...
 

I think the date is 19 Nisan 5676, which was indeed a Saturday, April 22, 1916
--
David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ

3321 - 3340 of 673526