Date   

News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

While I am sure that members with ties to Slonim will be interested in
this news release, you should all be aware of efforts to preserve Jewish
buildings and cemeteries in Belarus.

--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>
************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8 January 2001

Slonim Synagogue Saved

World Monument Fund and EEJHP Team up to Save Historic Landmark of East
European Jewry.

Minsk, 8 Janaury 2001. The East European Jewish Heritage Project
announced today that the first steps to assuring the preservation of the
historic Slonim Synagogue will be taken next week.

The historic building, listed by the World Monument Fund as the most
important Jewish structure in East Europe requiring restoration has long
been in a state of disrepair and jeopardy. Franklin J. Swartz, Executive
Director of the EEJHP, has lobbied for years for support to renew the
building. Finally with the support of Samuel Gruber, Director of the
International Survey of Jewish Monuments in the United States, the World
Monument Fund, also in the U.S., the U.K. based Conference of European
Rabbis, the Belarusian Government's Commission for the Preservation of the
Nation's Heritage and the Slonim Local Government conservation will
move ahead.

A WMF conservator and his team have already visited to begin work. 'I
am very heartened by this development,' said Mr. Swartz. Sam Gruber's
organisation and the WMF have an excellent track record. I hope that what
they were able to do in Krakow will be duplicated in Slonim.'

Located in the city centre the 16th century Synagogue was spared
destruction by both the Luftwaffe and the Soviet Air Force because of its
utility as a landmark for aerial navigation. After the war it was used as
a warehouse and for the past two decades has been empty. 'I was concerned
that unless work was begun rapidly we would have nothing to preserve', said
Mr. Swartz 'It is a great relief to me that work is finally beginning.'

The entire Jewish population of Slonim, 39,000 people, plus 2,000 Jews
from surrounding areas were murdered during the war. 'In many ways this
restoration will be a monument to a way of life which largely vanished
because of genocide, it is a monument that functions at many levels,' said
Mr. Swartz.

The Slonim Local Authority passed the title to the building over to the
Union of Religious Jewish Congregations of the Republic of Belarus in
November 2000. 'I am especially satisfied with this development',
said Mr. Swartz. 'We can be assured that the project will be in safe
hands. There has been an unfortunate history in Belarus of old line Soviet
apologists in the community misusing funds for memorials for their own
benefits. By passing the title to the building over to an organisation
run by a new generation in the Jewish community we can assure Western
donors of the integrity of the project.'Mr. Swartz pointed out that former
Communist Party Members who had actively supported repressive measures
during the Soviet period had attempted to prevent the restoration of the
synagogue as recently as last year. 'This was a disturbing development
but the failure of these attempts proves that the era of the 'Party Jew' is
coming to an end. This is another example of why the Slonim Synagogue is
not only a symbol of the past but a beacon of light for a renewed Jewish
future in East Europe.'

For more information about the Slonim Synagogue and other restoration
projects please contact:

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)

13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>


Belarus SIG #Belarus News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

While I am sure that members with ties to Slonim will be interested in
this news release, you should all be aware of efforts to preserve Jewish
buildings and cemeteries in Belarus.

--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>
************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8 January 2001

Slonim Synagogue Saved

World Monument Fund and EEJHP Team up to Save Historic Landmark of East
European Jewry.

Minsk, 8 Janaury 2001. The East European Jewish Heritage Project
announced today that the first steps to assuring the preservation of the
historic Slonim Synagogue will be taken next week.

The historic building, listed by the World Monument Fund as the most
important Jewish structure in East Europe requiring restoration has long
been in a state of disrepair and jeopardy. Franklin J. Swartz, Executive
Director of the EEJHP, has lobbied for years for support to renew the
building. Finally with the support of Samuel Gruber, Director of the
International Survey of Jewish Monuments in the United States, the World
Monument Fund, also in the U.S., the U.K. based Conference of European
Rabbis, the Belarusian Government's Commission for the Preservation of the
Nation's Heritage and the Slonim Local Government conservation will
move ahead.

A WMF conservator and his team have already visited to begin work. 'I
am very heartened by this development,' said Mr. Swartz. Sam Gruber's
organisation and the WMF have an excellent track record. I hope that what
they were able to do in Krakow will be duplicated in Slonim.'

Located in the city centre the 16th century Synagogue was spared
destruction by both the Luftwaffe and the Soviet Air Force because of its
utility as a landmark for aerial navigation. After the war it was used as
a warehouse and for the past two decades has been empty. 'I was concerned
that unless work was begun rapidly we would have nothing to preserve', said
Mr. Swartz 'It is a great relief to me that work is finally beginning.'

The entire Jewish population of Slonim, 39,000 people, plus 2,000 Jews
from surrounding areas were murdered during the war. 'In many ways this
restoration will be a monument to a way of life which largely vanished
because of genocide, it is a monument that functions at many levels,' said
Mr. Swartz.

The Slonim Local Authority passed the title to the building over to the
Union of Religious Jewish Congregations of the Republic of Belarus in
November 2000. 'I am especially satisfied with this development',
said Mr. Swartz. 'We can be assured that the project will be in safe
hands. There has been an unfortunate history in Belarus of old line Soviet
apologists in the community misusing funds for memorials for their own
benefits. By passing the title to the building over to an organisation
run by a new generation in the Jewish community we can assure Western
donors of the integrity of the project.'Mr. Swartz pointed out that former
Communist Party Members who had actively supported repressive measures
during the Soviet period had attempted to prevent the restoration of the
synagogue as recently as last year. 'This was a disturbing development
but the failure of these attempts proves that the era of the 'Party Jew' is
coming to an end. This is another example of why the Slonim Synagogue is
not only a symbol of the past but a beacon of light for a renewed Jewish
future in East Europe.'

For more information about the Slonim Synagogue and other restoration
projects please contact:

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)

13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>


*re: Magyarositas #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Judith and all,

Very well noted by Judith. Clearly one of the sources of magyarositas
are such annotations on the vital records, mostly on birth registers.
But this information has two caveats.

(1) One has to be able to understand either German or Hungarian or
Slovak, because these annotations are always made in the Observation
column, usually by the "anyakonyv vezeto" (registers keeper) and in
the language of the time when the entry was annotated. Usually these
annotations are phrases which describe in some length when and how
the authorization to change the surname was obtained.

(2) When examining a FHC film, one may skip a relative who has
changed his surname if the researcher ignores that fact. E.g. if say
my ancestors were called STARK and one of their descendants changed
his surname to EROS, assuming that I am ignorant of that fact, I will
never notice him on a film being examined, given that I'm looking for
the surname STARK and not for EROS.

Even so, I strongly recommend to examine what the Observation columns
annotations say.

As a matter of fact, never disregard what the column of witnesses
says either. You may find relatives or discover that one of your
known relative may have had some relation to a person unknown to you.
Special attention should be given to the "sandek" (person who holds a
boy during the circumcision ceremony, called "koma" in Hungarian). In
general this honor was given to a prominent family member or to a
very close relative (father or grandfather, maternal or paternal).
These can be important clues for unknown relationships and/or further
research.

the best
Tom


Re: Kosice cemetery #hungary

Bob Friedman <inwood@...>
 

Please note that the site also has a link to specific pages in English
on the Jewish cemeteries:

http://www.kosice.sk/history/zidovsky/jevish0.htm

Each cemetery on the site has a separate alphabetical listing that
must be checked. The main site referenced in Sam's original message
(see below) appears to be for a "Public Cemetery". The Military
Cemetery covers WWI and is found at

http://www.kosice.sk/history/vojensky/m_index.htm=20

I found Jewish surnames in all three of these cemetery lists.

Bob Friedman, NYC
inwood@pipeline.com

On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 10:26:37 EST, Sam Vass wrote:

The following URL leads to a web site that contains cemetery listings =
for=20
Kosice. It appears to be in Slovak, but the names and dates can be read.=
=20

http://www.kosice.sk/history/verejny/


Erdobenye #hungary

Graner Georges <georges.graner@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,
One of my friends is looking for the family of her ancestor DEUTSCH Leopold
Lajos, born at Erdo:benye on March 7, 1838. He later came to France where
he got married and died in 1890. Does this ring a bell for you ?

Do you know whether the Mormons have microfilmed registers >from Erdo:benye ?

Best regards,
Georges GRANER

************************************************************************
* Tracking #: 3B90573463E3D411AF790050049D3329828B6D4E
*
************************************************************************


Hungary SIG #Hungary *re: Magyarositas #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Judith and all,

Very well noted by Judith. Clearly one of the sources of magyarositas
are such annotations on the vital records, mostly on birth registers.
But this information has two caveats.

(1) One has to be able to understand either German or Hungarian or
Slovak, because these annotations are always made in the Observation
column, usually by the "anyakonyv vezeto" (registers keeper) and in
the language of the time when the entry was annotated. Usually these
annotations are phrases which describe in some length when and how
the authorization to change the surname was obtained.

(2) When examining a FHC film, one may skip a relative who has
changed his surname if the researcher ignores that fact. E.g. if say
my ancestors were called STARK and one of their descendants changed
his surname to EROS, assuming that I am ignorant of that fact, I will
never notice him on a film being examined, given that I'm looking for
the surname STARK and not for EROS.

Even so, I strongly recommend to examine what the Observation columns
annotations say.

As a matter of fact, never disregard what the column of witnesses
says either. You may find relatives or discover that one of your
known relative may have had some relation to a person unknown to you.
Special attention should be given to the "sandek" (person who holds a
boy during the circumcision ceremony, called "koma" in Hungarian). In
general this honor was given to a prominent family member or to a
very close relative (father or grandfather, maternal or paternal).
These can be important clues for unknown relationships and/or further
research.

the best
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Kosice cemetery #hungary

Bob Friedman <inwood@...>
 

Please note that the site also has a link to specific pages in English
on the Jewish cemeteries:

http://www.kosice.sk/history/zidovsky/jevish0.htm

Each cemetery on the site has a separate alphabetical listing that
must be checked. The main site referenced in Sam's original message
(see below) appears to be for a "Public Cemetery". The Military
Cemetery covers WWI and is found at

http://www.kosice.sk/history/vojensky/m_index.htm=20

I found Jewish surnames in all three of these cemetery lists.

Bob Friedman, NYC
inwood@pipeline.com

On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 10:26:37 EST, Sam Vass wrote:

The following URL leads to a web site that contains cemetery listings =
for=20
Kosice. It appears to be in Slovak, but the names and dates can be read.=
=20

http://www.kosice.sk/history/verejny/


Hungary SIG #Hungary Erdobenye #hungary

Graner Georges <georges.graner@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,
One of my friends is looking for the family of her ancestor DEUTSCH Leopold
Lajos, born at Erdo:benye on March 7, 1838. He later came to France where
he got married and died in 1890. Does this ring a bell for you ?

Do you know whether the Mormons have microfilmed registers >from Erdo:benye ?

Best regards,
Georges GRANER

************************************************************************
* Tracking #: 3B90573463E3D411AF790050049D3329828B6D4E
*
************************************************************************


Cemetery keepers #lithuania

Roman Vilner <roman.vilner@...>
 

Dear friends,

some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest, but
then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I will proceed
without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a respectable
company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg (naturally for
a fee)?

I know that list does not promote particular companies, so please
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY

roman.vilner@att.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Cemetery keepers #lithuania

Roman Vilner <roman.vilner@...>
 

Dear friends,

some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest, but
then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I will proceed
without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a respectable
company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg (naturally for
a fee)?

I know that list does not promote particular companies, so please
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY

roman.vilner@att.net


More on Inheritance Files in Kaunas Archives #lithuania

DBH12345@...
 

There have been many questions sent to me privately after the distribution to donors to Kaunas Guberniya research groups of the first 121 wills (mentioning 1254 beneficiaries and witnesses) that Vitalija Gircyte has translated >from the 1872 thru 1884 Kaunas Courts.

The primary questions were about the existence of more modern wills,
especially >from the 1920 through 1940 period. This is the situation: court
files on the confirmation of wills and similar records for 1920 - 1940 do
exist, although possibly in fragmentary or somewhat different conditions for different places. They are mostly in the Lithuanian Central State Archives (Address: O. Milasiaus, 21, LT-2016, Vilnius, Lithuania.)

Vitalija says that there are court records in Kaunas for the Vilkija
district court of 1920 - 1940 and some Jewish wills are among them. I would suggest not writing to her to search these, as they will soon be indexed as this project continues.

However getting any of these modern wills is more difficult than the older
ones. As in America and most of the world, privacy concerns limit access to
all records which are considered legal documents and this includes wills.
According to Lithuanian law, access to legal records is restricted for 75
years.

This does not mean that they are absolutely inaccessible - you can certainly look for the will of your parents or grandparents and receive a copy if it exists, but you have to apply formally and directly to the Lithuanian Central State Archives, produce the proof of relationship, etc. I do not yet know what constitutes proof of relationship, but will find out >from both the Kaunas Regional Archives, and the State Historical Archives, the Metrical Archives, and the Lithuanian Central State Archives in Vilnius. Vitalija says that these records are definitely checked when people request information.

At the Central State Archives, there is a general policy not to assist
genealogists, as with some other institutions. You are more likely to have
success if you are taken to the Lithuanian Central State Archives by someone such as Regina Kopilovech or another private researcher who has established good relationships with them. With this assistance and an appointment you can look at the records yourself.

Another exciting finding regarding these wills is that they include many
surnames that have not appeared on other documents which Vitalija has
researched in the Kaunas Regional Archives. This is because many lawyers,
doctors, wealthy merchants >from various towns, and even clerks and other
educated people who had been excluded >from the revision and family lists
because of their status, appear as the deceased or are mentioned in various
capacities on the wills. We have already noted that residents of one town,
are noted as "belonging" or being registered to another.

So far I am aware of at least nine people who have written to me indicating
that they have found one or more of the wills for their ancestors. A number of others have indicated that their ancestor is listed as a witness. I would not suggest that you order a will for these witnesses, because there won't be any additional information for them.

The indexes of inheritance files are being distributed to donors to the seven Kaunas Guberniya research groups prior to being included in the ALD. Contact your District coordinator who can be found at <http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/research.htm> for further information. Davida Noyek Handler at <Litvaks@aol.com> is the temporary coordinator for the Kaunas District.

David Hoffman
Coordinator, Raseiniai District Research Group
Coordinator, Ariogala Shtetl Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania More on Inheritance Files in Kaunas Archives #lithuania

DBH12345@...
 

There have been many questions sent to me privately after the distribution to donors to Kaunas Guberniya research groups of the first 121 wills (mentioning 1254 beneficiaries and witnesses) that Vitalija Gircyte has translated >from the 1872 thru 1884 Kaunas Courts.

The primary questions were about the existence of more modern wills,
especially >from the 1920 through 1940 period. This is the situation: court
files on the confirmation of wills and similar records for 1920 - 1940 do
exist, although possibly in fragmentary or somewhat different conditions for different places. They are mostly in the Lithuanian Central State Archives (Address: O. Milasiaus, 21, LT-2016, Vilnius, Lithuania.)

Vitalija says that there are court records in Kaunas for the Vilkija
district court of 1920 - 1940 and some Jewish wills are among them. I would suggest not writing to her to search these, as they will soon be indexed as this project continues.

However getting any of these modern wills is more difficult than the older
ones. As in America and most of the world, privacy concerns limit access to
all records which are considered legal documents and this includes wills.
According to Lithuanian law, access to legal records is restricted for 75
years.

This does not mean that they are absolutely inaccessible - you can certainly look for the will of your parents or grandparents and receive a copy if it exists, but you have to apply formally and directly to the Lithuanian Central State Archives, produce the proof of relationship, etc. I do not yet know what constitutes proof of relationship, but will find out >from both the Kaunas Regional Archives, and the State Historical Archives, the Metrical Archives, and the Lithuanian Central State Archives in Vilnius. Vitalija says that these records are definitely checked when people request information.

At the Central State Archives, there is a general policy not to assist
genealogists, as with some other institutions. You are more likely to have
success if you are taken to the Lithuanian Central State Archives by someone such as Regina Kopilovech or another private researcher who has established good relationships with them. With this assistance and an appointment you can look at the records yourself.

Another exciting finding regarding these wills is that they include many
surnames that have not appeared on other documents which Vitalija has
researched in the Kaunas Regional Archives. This is because many lawyers,
doctors, wealthy merchants >from various towns, and even clerks and other
educated people who had been excluded >from the revision and family lists
because of their status, appear as the deceased or are mentioned in various
capacities on the wills. We have already noted that residents of one town,
are noted as "belonging" or being registered to another.

So far I am aware of at least nine people who have written to me indicating
that they have found one or more of the wills for their ancestors. A number of others have indicated that their ancestor is listed as a witness. I would not suggest that you order a will for these witnesses, because there won't be any additional information for them.

The indexes of inheritance files are being distributed to donors to the seven Kaunas Guberniya research groups prior to being included in the ALD. Contact your District coordinator who can be found at <http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/research.htm> for further information. Davida Noyek Handler at <Litvaks@aol.com> is the temporary coordinator for the Kaunas District.

David Hoffman
Coordinator, Raseiniai District Research Group
Coordinator, Ariogala Shtetl Research Group


Litvak videos - yeshiva tour and Ponevez revisited #lithuania

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

Browsing through the online catalog of the Hebrew Theological College
Saul Silber Memorial Library (in Skokie, Illinois) I came across the
following two videos which I had not heard of before and thought that others may be interested in them. HTC catalog:
http://www.librarycom.com/htc/

*Hightlights of the Lithuanian yeshiva tour [video recording] / sponsored by Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.

Library of Congress Call Number: DS 135 L5 Y5 1999
Main Entry-Personal Name: Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
Title Statement: Hightlights of the Lithuanian yeshiva tour [video
recording] / sponsored by Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
Edition Statement:
Publication Distribution Data: Jerusalem Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
1999
Physical Description: 1 VHS cass. ; 55 min.

*Ponevez revisited [film by Irving Wiener]

Library of Congress Call Number: Video DS 135 L5 W45 1998
Main Entry-Personal Name: "Wiener, Irving"
Title Statement: Ponevez revisited [film by Irving Wiener]
Edition Statement:
Publication Distribution Data: "Patchogue, NY ; Brooklyn" Hoffman Visual
Communication ; M. Wiener [1998]
Physical Description: 1 VHS cassette
General Note: Contains film photographed in 1932 & 1934 by Irving Wiener
and video >from 1997 visit to Ponevez.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
http://members.screenz.com/bennypostcards

_


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Litvak videos - yeshiva tour and Ponevez revisited #lithuania

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

Browsing through the online catalog of the Hebrew Theological College
Saul Silber Memorial Library (in Skokie, Illinois) I came across the
following two videos which I had not heard of before and thought that others may be interested in them. HTC catalog:
http://www.librarycom.com/htc/

*Hightlights of the Lithuanian yeshiva tour [video recording] / sponsored by Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.

Library of Congress Call Number: DS 135 L5 Y5 1999
Main Entry-Personal Name: Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
Title Statement: Hightlights of the Lithuanian yeshiva tour [video
recording] / sponsored by Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
Edition Statement:
Publication Distribution Data: Jerusalem Yeshiva Ahavas Torah Baranovich.
1999
Physical Description: 1 VHS cass. ; 55 min.

*Ponevez revisited [film by Irving Wiener]

Library of Congress Call Number: Video DS 135 L5 W45 1998
Main Entry-Personal Name: "Wiener, Irving"
Title Statement: Ponevez revisited [film by Irving Wiener]
Edition Statement:
Publication Distribution Data: "Patchogue, NY ; Brooklyn" Hoffman Visual
Communication ; M. Wiener [1998]
Physical Description: 1 VHS cassette
General Note: Contains film photographed in 1932 & 1934 by Irving Wiener
and video >from 1997 visit to Ponevez.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
http://members.screenz.com/bennypostcards

_


Divorce and Litvaks #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Andrea Vangor asks:

<<
A question for the list: was divorce practiced by Litvak Jews circa
1880-85? >>

The answer is definitely "yes". A glance through the book, "Jewish Vital
Records, Revisions Lists and Other Jewish Holdings in the Lithuanian
Archives" compiled by Harold Rhode and Sallyann Sack (Avotaynu, 1996)
shows the designation for divorce records (v) in almost every town for which there are vital records in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives. For some towns, those records do include the time period in question.

In the book, "There Once Was a World," by Prof. Yaffa Eliach, about
Eishyshok, the town in which my father was born, you can find an extensive
section about the divorces that took place in the shtetl in the latter
part of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th.

Meir Wilkanski, son of shtetl dayan (judge) Reb. Layzer Wilkanski, was privy to the intimate transactions surrounding divorces -- and averted divorces -- and later recorded this information in his autobiographical books.

As Wilkanski recounts, Prof. Eliach notes in her book, the reasons that motivated couples to seek a divorce were "as diverse as the range of human emotion, as colorful as the spectrum of human life itself" : miserliness, sexual abuse, incest, interfering in-laws, money, illness, children >from previous marriages, violence.

Among the Eishyshok records in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives
(1891-1914, there are six divorces, all recorded after 1903. But in these cases, no reason is given for the divorce.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@aol.com
San Francisco, CA, USA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Divorce and Litvaks #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Andrea Vangor asks:

<<
A question for the list: was divorce practiced by Litvak Jews circa
1880-85? >>

The answer is definitely "yes". A glance through the book, "Jewish Vital
Records, Revisions Lists and Other Jewish Holdings in the Lithuanian
Archives" compiled by Harold Rhode and Sallyann Sack (Avotaynu, 1996)
shows the designation for divorce records (v) in almost every town for which there are vital records in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives. For some towns, those records do include the time period in question.

In the book, "There Once Was a World," by Prof. Yaffa Eliach, about
Eishyshok, the town in which my father was born, you can find an extensive
section about the divorces that took place in the shtetl in the latter
part of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th.

Meir Wilkanski, son of shtetl dayan (judge) Reb. Layzer Wilkanski, was privy to the intimate transactions surrounding divorces -- and averted divorces -- and later recorded this information in his autobiographical books.

As Wilkanski recounts, Prof. Eliach notes in her book, the reasons that motivated couples to seek a divorce were "as diverse as the range of human emotion, as colorful as the spectrum of human life itself" : miserliness, sexual abuse, incest, interfering in-laws, money, illness, children >from previous marriages, violence.

Among the Eishyshok records in the Lithuanian State Historical Archives
(1891-1914, there are six divorces, all recorded after 1903. But in these cases, no reason is given for the divorce.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@aol.com
San Francisco, CA, USA


PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses #belarus

Martin Kronman <mkronman@...>
 

Its a long bitter story why this is the second time within the week that I
have notify you of a change in email address. It is now
mkronman@dreamscape.com. Please forgive me for this!

Martin Kronman
Syracuse, NY

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make any changes in the JGFF

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from the JewishGen homepage
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click on JGFF and once there
select SEARCH

Search any surname that you listed in that program and your
researcher CODE will be shown in parenthesis.
Please WRITE IT DOWN!

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Send an e-mail containing your researcher CODE, your full name
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Please consider modifying your PASSWORD to one that you will
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Go back to the beginning of the JGFF and click on MODIFY, select
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Belarus SIG #Belarus PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses #belarus

Martin Kronman <mkronman@...>
 

Its a long bitter story why this is the second time within the week that I
have notify you of a change in email address. It is now
mkronman@dreamscape.com. Please forgive me for this!

Martin Kronman
Syracuse, NY

---------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
---------------
Re: change of e-mail addresses - Please save this for future use
----------------------------------------------------------------
We're sorry, there is no secretarial staff at any of the
JewishGen programs to make changes to any subscription
on your behalf. You are expected to do this yourself.

***********************************************************
HERE IS HOW A DESCRIPTION HOT TO DO THAT
PLEASE KEEP THIS FOR FUTURE USE!
***********************************************************
&
***********************************************************
REMEMBER TO CHANGE YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS IN JGFF ETC. AS WELL
***********************************************************

To change your e-mail address:
------------------------------
If you still have access to your former e-mail address AND
from THAT ADDRESS ONLY send an e-mail to:
listserv@lyris.jewishgen.org

and say:

set (listname) email=and type your new e-mail address

In place of the word "listname" insert the list to which
you belong, if you belong to more than one list, type the
same message again.
NOTE: There is no space on either side of the=sign

------------------------------

If you no longer have access to your old address, the
simplest way is to go to the online system and enter an
Unsubscribe order >from the old address and then enter a
Subscribe order >from the new address.

For any of the SIG or Research Group mailing lists, the
URL is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv/sigs.htm


***********************************************************
REMEMBER TO CHANGE YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS IN JGFF ETC. AS WELL
***********************************************************

To change your e-mail address in the JGFF the URL is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/

Select the MODIFY icon.

You will need both your password and researcher code to
make any changes in the JGFF

To get your JGFF researcher CODE:

from the JewishGen homepage
http://www.jewishgen.org
click on JGFF and once there
select SEARCH

Search any surname that you listed in that program and your
researcher CODE will be shown in parenthesis.
Please WRITE IT DOWN!

To get your password:
Send an e-mail containing your researcher CODE, your full name
and address to
password@jewishgen.org
and your PASSWORD will be returned to you.

Please consider modifying your PASSWORD to one that you will
remember.

Go back to the beginning of the JGFF and click on MODIFY, select
changing password, then follow the instructions to change your
password to one you will not forget.

Finally, if you are requesting a change in your e-mail address
in conjunction with a gift through the JewishGen-erosity program
please notify

owner-jewishgen-erosity@jewishgen.org

Thanks for your cooperation,
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The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife #belarus

David Frey <dfrey@...>
 

In the tale of the "Trip to Beshincovichi" in the Belarus Online
Newsletter, Issue No. 3 - May 1999:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/frey.htm

written by yours truly, I humbly suggested that the purpose of my
trip was to find some evidence that the family tale of Rabbi Avram
Isroel Gildenson was in some sense true. Upon finding the "lost"
cemetery of the town it became apparent that at least certain facts
were true. There was such a town. Some of the gravestones suggested
that members of my current family were named after their parents or
grandparents.

However since the gravestones contained only references such as Rifka,
daughter of Rev. Mendel and some dates, actual verification would be
difficult.

One of the central components of the story of the Rabbi was that he
was married twice and his second wife was married three times. All we
knew of this prolific woman was that her first husband had the last
name of Steinhart by whom she bore a daughter named Elka Leah, the
second husband's name has been lost to history and the third was
named Gildenson, The Rabbi of the town, and possibly a student of
Menachem Mendal of Vitebsk.

But even though I found the cemetery, I found not one shred of direct
evidence that the family tale was true. The story passed on by my
Grandmother, Beila, and told to me by my mother was that the woman at
the centre of this saga was named Frumma Chana, and that she owned
and ran a grocery store.

Tonight, this very night I looked through:

"The Vsia Rossiia translation team for the 1911 Vitebsk data:
Roberta Solit supplied the paper copies of Vsia Rossiia used
in the translation. The data was translated by Tom Gartman,
Vitaly Charney edited the data and supplied the list of
abbreviations."

And to my amazement I did a search on Gildensohn and came up with:

Surname: GILDENSON
Given: Khava Mord.
Patronymic:
Occupation: Grocery
Year: 1911
Column #: 407
Town: Beshenkovichi
Uyezd: Lepel
Gubernia: Vitebsk

So here it was, the first actual proof that someone name Khava
Gildenson, grocery store owner, actually existed. >from Frumme Chana
to Khava, daughter of Mordichi, is not such a big leap. Perhaps the
Mordichi that my uncle Morris the Doctor was named after, and
probably the Mother of Elka Leah, named after the first wife of the
Rabbi.

And just make the story complete, my lately departed Mother's name
was Elka Leah. I was with her for five years as she slowly died of
Alzheimer's.

And so while the details of the story are not complete, as they never
are, the G-d of my people, the G-d who I prayed to, while standing in
front of that overgrown cemetery, G-d granted me a pearl to wear in
my heart, as long as it lasts, and to pass on to my sons when it
finally gives out.

Baruch Ha Shem

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au


Belarus SIG #Belarus The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife #belarus

David Frey <dfrey@...>
 

In the tale of the "Trip to Beshincovichi" in the Belarus Online
Newsletter, Issue No. 3 - May 1999:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/frey.htm

written by yours truly, I humbly suggested that the purpose of my
trip was to find some evidence that the family tale of Rabbi Avram
Isroel Gildenson was in some sense true. Upon finding the "lost"
cemetery of the town it became apparent that at least certain facts
were true. There was such a town. Some of the gravestones suggested
that members of my current family were named after their parents or
grandparents.

However since the gravestones contained only references such as Rifka,
daughter of Rev. Mendel and some dates, actual verification would be
difficult.

One of the central components of the story of the Rabbi was that he
was married twice and his second wife was married three times. All we
knew of this prolific woman was that her first husband had the last
name of Steinhart by whom she bore a daughter named Elka Leah, the
second husband's name has been lost to history and the third was
named Gildenson, The Rabbi of the town, and possibly a student of
Menachem Mendal of Vitebsk.

But even though I found the cemetery, I found not one shred of direct
evidence that the family tale was true. The story passed on by my
Grandmother, Beila, and told to me by my mother was that the woman at
the centre of this saga was named Frumma Chana, and that she owned
and ran a grocery store.

Tonight, this very night I looked through:

"The Vsia Rossiia translation team for the 1911 Vitebsk data:
Roberta Solit supplied the paper copies of Vsia Rossiia used
in the translation. The data was translated by Tom Gartman,
Vitaly Charney edited the data and supplied the list of
abbreviations."

And to my amazement I did a search on Gildensohn and came up with:

Surname: GILDENSON
Given: Khava Mord.
Patronymic:
Occupation: Grocery
Year: 1911
Column #: 407
Town: Beshenkovichi
Uyezd: Lepel
Gubernia: Vitebsk

So here it was, the first actual proof that someone name Khava
Gildenson, grocery store owner, actually existed. >from Frumme Chana
to Khava, daughter of Mordichi, is not such a big leap. Perhaps the
Mordichi that my uncle Morris the Doctor was named after, and
probably the Mother of Elka Leah, named after the first wife of the
Rabbi.

And just make the story complete, my lately departed Mother's name
was Elka Leah. I was with her for five years as she slowly died of
Alzheimer's.

And so while the details of the story are not complete, as they never
are, the G-d of my people, the G-d who I prayed to, while standing in
front of that overgrown cemetery, G-d granted me a pearl to wear in
my heart, as long as it lasts, and to pass on to my sons when it
finally gives out.

Baruch Ha Shem

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au