Date   

(Canada) Library and Archives Canada Insights to the 1926 Prairie Provinces Census #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously posted to this discussion group I wrote about the 1926 Prairie
Provinces Census now available on the Library and Archives (LAC) website.
LAC has written a blog piece about insights to the census for Manitoba,
Saskatchewan and Alberta including the instructions to Commissioners and
Enumerators. The blog post may be read at: https://tinyurl.com/yy5t78al
Original url:
https://thediscoverblog.com/2019/05/02/why-is-that-written-there-insights-into-the-census-of-manitoba-saskatchewan-and-alberta-1926-instructions-to-commissioners-and-enumerators/

The instructions to Commissioners and Enumerators may be found at:
https://tinyurl.com/y34odxlg
Original url:
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2017/statcan/CS98-1926I-eng.pdf

The LAC website is bi-lingual-- English and French.

To read previous IAJGS Records Access Alerts on this census or other LAC
items see the IAJGS Records Access Alert archives at:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts. You must be
registered to access the archives. To register for the IAJGS Records Access
Alert go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts
You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the
subscription will not be finalized. It is required to include your
organization affiliation (genealogy organization, etc.)

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Canada) Library and Archives Canada Insights to the 1926 Prairie Provinces Census #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Previously posted to this discussion group I wrote about the 1926 Prairie
Provinces Census now available on the Library and Archives (LAC) website.
LAC has written a blog piece about insights to the census for Manitoba,
Saskatchewan and Alberta including the instructions to Commissioners and
Enumerators. The blog post may be read at: https://tinyurl.com/yy5t78al
Original url:
https://thediscoverblog.com/2019/05/02/why-is-that-written-there-insights-into-the-census-of-manitoba-saskatchewan-and-alberta-1926-instructions-to-commissioners-and-enumerators/

The instructions to Commissioners and Enumerators may be found at:
https://tinyurl.com/y34odxlg
Original url:
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2017/statcan/CS98-1926I-eng.pdf

The LAC website is bi-lingual-- English and French.

To read previous IAJGS Records Access Alerts on this census or other LAC
items see the IAJGS Records Access Alert archives at:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts. You must be
registered to access the archives. To register for the IAJGS Records Access
Alert go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts
You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the
subscription will not be finalized. It is required to include your
organization affiliation (genealogy organization, etc.)

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


IGRA Event in Raanana: New Developments in Beit Hatfutsot Databases. Monday May 13th #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Please join us on Monday May 13th for our next IGRA meeting in Raanana,
entitled "New Developments in the Databases of The Museum of the Jewish
People at Beit Hatfutsot." The presentation will be given by Horia Haim
F. Ghiuzeli, Director, Databases Department.

The Museum's database houses searchable archives of photos, films,
genealogy etc., all related to Jews and Jewish history. The presentation
will focus specifically on new developments in the museum's databases
and how they can be useful for genealogical research.

Horia Haim F. Ghiuzeli is a historian whose expertise covers several
fields including development of multimedia databases and implementation
of computer technologies in the field of cultural heritage. He is a
frequent lecturer (including at IAJGS conferences) and author of
numerous articles on Jewish heritage.

Location: Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner Street, Ra'anana.
Time: Doors open 19:00, Presentation begins at 19:30
Cost: IGRA members-Free Admission, Non-members-NIS 20

We look forward to seeing you,

Ingrid Rockberger
Co-Chair, Sharon area
Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)

To join IGRA, go to http://genealogy.org.il/membership/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA Event in Raanana: New Developments in Beit Hatfutsot Databases. Monday May 13th #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Please join us on Monday May 13th for our next IGRA meeting in Raanana,
entitled "New Developments in the Databases of The Museum of the Jewish
People at Beit Hatfutsot." The presentation will be given by Horia Haim
F. Ghiuzeli, Director, Databases Department.

The Museum's database houses searchable archives of photos, films,
genealogy etc., all related to Jews and Jewish history. The presentation
will focus specifically on new developments in the museum's databases
and how they can be useful for genealogical research.

Horia Haim F. Ghiuzeli is a historian whose expertise covers several
fields including development of multimedia databases and implementation
of computer technologies in the field of cultural heritage. He is a
frequent lecturer (including at IAJGS conferences) and author of
numerous articles on Jewish heritage.

Location: Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner Street, Ra'anana.
Time: Doors open 19:00, Presentation begins at 19:30
Cost: IGRA members-Free Admission, Non-members-NIS 20

We look forward to seeing you,

Ingrid Rockberger
Co-Chair, Sharon area
Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)

To join IGRA, go to http://genealogy.org.il/membership/


Looking for descendants of Jacob MILLER and Joseph MILLER #france

Laurent Ettouati
 

Hello,

I am looking to get in touch with the descendants of the maternal
great-uncles of my wife who changed their name of MALARCZYK to MILLER
when emigrate to the US.

We know at least Jacob MILLER born 25/01/1894 in Lomza (Poland) married
to Becky GREENBERG born 15/08/1897 in Lomza (Poland) with 2 sons Martin
MILLER and Bernard MILLER and two daughters Ellen and Celia and Joseph
MILLER born 30/11/1897 in Lomza (Poland) married to Becky PALIWADA born
circa 1901 in Lomza (Poland) with two daughters Beatrice and Ruth and
one son Frances.

Thanks for you help.

Laurent Ettouati
--
laurent.ettouati@bbox.fr
Lyon
France


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #france

bounce-3680936-772957@...
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


French SIG #France Looking for descendants of Jacob MILLER and Joseph MILLER #france

Laurent Ettouati
 

Hello,

I am looking to get in touch with the descendants of the maternal
great-uncles of my wife who changed their name of MALARCZYK to MILLER
when emigrate to the US.

We know at least Jacob MILLER born 25/01/1894 in Lomza (Poland) married
to Becky GREENBERG born 15/08/1897 in Lomza (Poland) with 2 sons Martin
MILLER and Bernard MILLER and two daughters Ellen and Celia and Joseph
MILLER born 30/11/1897 in Lomza (Poland) married to Becky PALIWADA born
circa 1901 in Lomza (Poland) with two daughters Beatrice and Ruth and
one son Frances.

Thanks for you help.

Laurent Ettouati
--
laurent.ettouati@bbox.fr
Lyon
France


French SIG #France Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #france

bounce-3680936-772957@...
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #lodz #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #lodz #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #lithuania

Avraham Groll
 

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #lithuania

Avraham Groll
 

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


APOTHEKER Family Galicia and in the USA #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I am researching my wife's family APOTHEKER. Her grandfather Lazar
APOTHEKER (1858-1942) was born in Nowy Sacz (Tzanz) and had at least
7 siblings:Baruch Markus, Dawid Alexander, Mojzesz, Marjem,Jochewed,
Ester, Eidel. The oldest was Barukh Markus(b.1853).They were the
only APOTHEKERs there according to a document >from 1870. The head
of the family was Saul Isaak APOTHEKER(1831-1893) married to
Lea Landau.All his children named one of their boys Shaul. Recently I
had several breakthroughs and found out that Shaul's children lived in
Krakow lived later in their life in Bardejov(Slovakia),
Przemysl and the nearby shtetl Nizankowice, Dobromyl, Lesko and
Krakow. All the Apothekers I found at JRI-PL in Galician
locations are offsprings of Shaul. Ellis Island DB lists some of
them as coming >from Lemberg(Lwow) and Bobrka(Bibrka) not
too far >from there.I managed to locate Rabbi Leib APTHEKER who was
Rabbi in NY(apparently the son of Barukh Markus
mentioned above). Alexander Beider mentions also Stanislawow, Borszcz
ow and Kolomyja as places where members of the family lived in. My
wife's father Dawid APOTHEKER(1908-1995) was on the Sugihara list
and stayed during the War in Shanghai. We found on the Sugihara
list another Dawid APOTHEKER. We thought at the beginning that it
was a technical mistake but later found out that this one indicated
to the JDC that he had a cousin in NY( the son of Rabbi Leib
Apotheker).

But as far as we know he never made it to Shanghai and have no idea what
happened to him. The given names Dawid, Leib(Leo), Meshulam have also
strong presence in the family. We know of another Dawid APOTHEKER who
was in NYC in 1892 through this scandalous story,but have on idea who
he was but that he was >from Galicia.
https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23123171/david_apotheker_bigamist/

There was also an APOTHEKER family in Iassi, Romania but they are probably
not connected.

If any of those names ring a bell,mainly for those who live around NY, or
any one >from Galicia who has them on his tree we would be glad to hear
from you.
Regards >from Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland APOTHEKER Family Galicia and in the USA #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I am researching my wife's family APOTHEKER. Her grandfather Lazar
APOTHEKER (1858-1942) was born in Nowy Sacz (Tzanz) and had at least
7 siblings:Baruch Markus, Dawid Alexander, Mojzesz, Marjem,Jochewed,
Ester, Eidel. The oldest was Barukh Markus(b.1853).They were the
only APOTHEKERs there according to a document >from 1870. The head
of the family was Saul Isaak APOTHEKER(1831-1893) married to
Lea Landau.All his children named one of their boys Shaul. Recently I
had several breakthroughs and found out that Shaul's children lived in
Krakow lived later in their life in Bardejov(Slovakia),
Przemysl and the nearby shtetl Nizankowice, Dobromyl, Lesko and
Krakow. All the Apothekers I found at JRI-PL in Galician
locations are offsprings of Shaul. Ellis Island DB lists some of
them as coming >from Lemberg(Lwow) and Bobrka(Bibrka) not
too far >from there.I managed to locate Rabbi Leib APTHEKER who was
Rabbi in NY(apparently the son of Barukh Markus
mentioned above). Alexander Beider mentions also Stanislawow, Borszcz
ow and Kolomyja as places where members of the family lived in. My
wife's father Dawid APOTHEKER(1908-1995) was on the Sugihara list
and stayed during the War in Shanghai. We found on the Sugihara
list another Dawid APOTHEKER. We thought at the beginning that it
was a technical mistake but later found out that this one indicated
to the JDC that he had a cousin in NY( the son of Rabbi Leib
Apotheker).

But as far as we know he never made it to Shanghai and have no idea what
happened to him. The given names Dawid, Leib(Leo), Meshulam have also
strong presence in the family. We know of another Dawid APOTHEKER who
was in NYC in 1892 through this scandalous story,but have on idea who
he was but that he was >from Galicia.
https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23123171/david_apotheker_bigamist/

There was also an APOTHEKER family in Iassi, Romania but they are probably
not connected.

If any of those names ring a bell,mainly for those who live around NY, or
any one >from Galicia who has them on his tree we would be glad to hear
from you.
Regards >from Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Question about camps in 1941 in Ukraine near the Transylvanian border? #ukraine

Susanna Vendel
 

After the Second Wienna Award in 1940-41 a brother and a sister of my
father (living in Oradea) fled across the border, to Ukraine. In 1960
our family, than living in Romania, got in touch with the sister (the
brother had died in a camp) who was at that time living in Mariinsk.
She told us that they were caught on the other side of the border and
put in a Soviet camp and after some years she was sent to Mariinsk
where she lived under harsh conditions. When I met her in 1998 she
did't want to tell me more about her life in the camp. I know only
that she raised her children in Mariinsk and they moved to Moscow
around aprox 1980. She is not living anymore.

I wonder if it is possible to find some information about the camps
near the Ukraine's border and about the deportees life in Mariinsk?
Even if there are registers or name lists etc.?

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Question about camps in 1941 in Ukraine near the Transylvanian border? #ukraine

Susanna Vendel
 

After the Second Wienna Award in 1940-41 a brother and a sister of my
father (living in Oradea) fled across the border, to Ukraine. In 1960
our family, than living in Romania, got in touch with the sister (the
brother had died in a camp) who was at that time living in Mariinsk.
She told us that they were caught on the other side of the border and
put in a Soviet camp and after some years she was sent to Mariinsk
where she lived under harsh conditions. When I met her in 1998 she
did't want to tell me more about her life in the camp. I know only
that she raised her children in Mariinsk and they moved to Moscow
around aprox 1980. She is not living anymore.

I wonder if it is possible to find some information about the camps
near the Ukraine's border and about the deportees life in Mariinsk?
Even if there are registers or name lists etc.?

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #austria-czech

bounce-3680936-772950@...
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #austria-czech

bounce-3680936-772950@...
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org

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