Date   

Bernard Offen-Krakow #galicia

Edna Hoover
 

I just came across a reference to Bernard Offen on p. 210-211 of Ruth Ellen
Gruber's chapter on Krakow in "Upon the Doorposts of Thy House" (1994). At
the time she met him, he was working as a local tour guide and developing a
film project called "Jacob, the Shoemaker." She says he lived in San
Francisco part of the year. Does anyone know how I can get in touch with
him or his family?

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]

"Edna Hoover"
Brooklyn NY
JGFF Researcher # 66736
For:
OFFEN Mielec, Rzeszow Area, Poland
MAURER Mielec, Rzeszow Area, Poland


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Bernard Offen-Krakow #galicia

Edna Hoover
 

I just came across a reference to Bernard Offen on p. 210-211 of Ruth Ellen
Gruber's chapter on Krakow in "Upon the Doorposts of Thy House" (1994). At
the time she met him, he was working as a local tour guide and developing a
film project called "Jacob, the Shoemaker." She says he lived in San
Francisco part of the year. Does anyone know how I can get in touch with
him or his family?

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]

"Edna Hoover"
Brooklyn NY
JGFF Researcher # 66736
For:
OFFEN Mielec, Rzeszow Area, Poland
MAURER Mielec, Rzeszow Area, Poland


Name equivalents #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

My great grandfather's death certificate lists his father's name as Louis.
He has no tombstone. My great grandfather's youngest son's name was Lajos,
so Louis makes sense to me.

A person, whom I am reasonably certain was his brother, lists his father's
name as George on the death certificate and Yehudah as the father's name on
his tombstone.

Could George and Louis both be equivalents of Yehudah?

All speculation appreciated.

Debbi Korman
Van Nuys, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Name equivalents #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

My great grandfather's death certificate lists his father's name as Louis.
He has no tombstone. My great grandfather's youngest son's name was Lajos,
so Louis makes sense to me.

A person, whom I am reasonably certain was his brother, lists his father's
name as George on the death certificate and Yehudah as the father's name on
his tombstone.

Could George and Louis both be equivalents of Yehudah?

All speculation appreciated.

Debbi Korman
Van Nuys, CA


GA'CS #hungary

B Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Regarding the comments that Ga'cs is aka Galicia, I was previously told
Ga'cs is now known as Halic, Slovakia. On my great-grandmother's death
certificate, where it asks place of father's birth, was written "Ga'cs",
nothing else. So would it be Galicia or Ga'cs/Halic, Slovakia?

Thanks to anyone who can unravel the mystery.

Regards,
Bonnie Zeisler Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com
Seeking: ZEISLER/CZEISLER; LOWY; UNGAR. GROEDEL; WEINER; ERNST/ECSEDI =
(Eger,
DiosGyor, Kazincz, Ga'cs, Marmarross, Budapest, Szolnok; Szentes; =
Kapolna;
Tarnamera, Ujfalu; Vacs)


Re: hung. translation #hungary

ilona lerman <phililona2001@...>
 

Thanks to those of you who helped with my query of a
few days ago.
Now I have another- a cousin found written on the back
of an old wedding picture the following:
Emlekul. Moritzes Szerench. This is Nacritol and I
think a date follows. Are these names, places, or
something else? (Moritz was an uncle)
Thanks again in advance for your kind help.

Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak


Hungary SIG #Hungary GA'CS #hungary

B Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Regarding the comments that Ga'cs is aka Galicia, I was previously told
Ga'cs is now known as Halic, Slovakia. On my great-grandmother's death
certificate, where it asks place of father's birth, was written "Ga'cs",
nothing else. So would it be Galicia or Ga'cs/Halic, Slovakia?

Thanks to anyone who can unravel the mystery.

Regards,
Bonnie Zeisler Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com
Seeking: ZEISLER/CZEISLER; LOWY; UNGAR. GROEDEL; WEINER; ERNST/ECSEDI =
(Eger,
DiosGyor, Kazincz, Ga'cs, Marmarross, Budapest, Szolnok; Szentes; =
Kapolna;
Tarnamera, Ujfalu; Vacs)


Hungary SIG #Hungary re: hung. translation #hungary

ilona lerman <phililona2001@...>
 

Thanks to those of you who helped with my query of a
few days ago.
Now I have another- a cousin found written on the back
of an old wedding picture the following:
Emlekul. Moritzes Szerench. This is Nacritol and I
think a date follows. Are these names, places, or
something else? (Moritz was an uncle)
Thanks again in advance for your kind help.

Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak


*Re: Auschwitz database #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

Gabor gives us a pretty good outline of what the Auschwitz Museum archives contain and the period covered. For those with families in the previous Czechoslovak Republic, keep in mind that the Bohemian deportations begin as early as in autumn 1941 (before the Final Solution) and that the mass of Slovakian deportation occurred in the summer/fall of 1942. Thus the bulk of Czechoslovak citizen were deported during the period which those records register.
See: <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005405>

Two exceptions, very important for the H-SIG researcher:

1. Because of war efforts reasons, most of the professionals (doctors, lawyers, engineers, etc.) and their families received "exception papers" >from the local authorities, and were called "vinimky" in Slovakian, "kivetelesek" in Hungarian. These people were deported much later.

2. After late 1938, a portion of the southern part of the Czechoslovak Republic was annexed to Hungary. Jews >from that part were deported only in spring 1944, when the German Army occupied Hungary.

Friendly regards
Tom

At 01:00 -0500 26.08.2004, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Auschwitz database
From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=E1bor_Hirsch?= <hirsch@cyberlink.ch>
Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 09:33:49 +0200
X-Message-Number: 5

This documentation is based on the original records kept by the SS
authorities of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and death camps.
They contain entries for the death dates of Auschwitz prisoners in the
period >from July 27, 1941 to December 31, 1943.

It might deal also with many >from Czechoslovakia? Slovakia?.
So in my opinion (but I can fail) the Jews of Hungary inside the border
of 1942 are not included in the datebase, but some >from greater Hungary
might.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch
.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Elmebaj #hungary

Blumstein
 

At 1:00 AM -0500 on 8/26/04, David Sencer typed:
Would dementia work? That is a common stated cause of death of the aged.
Probably. I checked the Hungarian Dictionary <http://dict.sztaki.hu/english-hungarian> and it gave dementia, insanity and lunacy as definitions.

Paul Blumstein
Los Angeles


Hungary SIG #Hungary *Re: Auschwitz database #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

Gabor gives us a pretty good outline of what the Auschwitz Museum archives contain and the period covered. For those with families in the previous Czechoslovak Republic, keep in mind that the Bohemian deportations begin as early as in autumn 1941 (before the Final Solution) and that the mass of Slovakian deportation occurred in the summer/fall of 1942. Thus the bulk of Czechoslovak citizen were deported during the period which those records register.
See: <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005405>

Two exceptions, very important for the H-SIG researcher:

1. Because of war efforts reasons, most of the professionals (doctors, lawyers, engineers, etc.) and their families received "exception papers" >from the local authorities, and were called "vinimky" in Slovakian, "kivetelesek" in Hungarian. These people were deported much later.

2. After late 1938, a portion of the southern part of the Czechoslovak Republic was annexed to Hungary. Jews >from that part were deported only in spring 1944, when the German Army occupied Hungary.

Friendly regards
Tom

At 01:00 -0500 26.08.2004, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Auschwitz database
From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=E1bor_Hirsch?= <hirsch@cyberlink.ch>
Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 09:33:49 +0200
X-Message-Number: 5

This documentation is based on the original records kept by the SS
authorities of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and death camps.
They contain entries for the death dates of Auschwitz prisoners in the
period >from July 27, 1941 to December 31, 1943.

It might deal also with many >from Czechoslovakia? Slovakia?.
So in my opinion (but I can fail) the Jews of Hungary inside the border
of 1942 are not included in the datebase, but some >from greater Hungary
might.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch
.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Elmebaj #hungary

Blumstein
 

At 1:00 AM -0500 on 8/26/04, David Sencer typed:
Would dementia work? That is a common stated cause of death of the aged.
Probably. I checked the Hungarian Dictionary <http://dict.sztaki.hu/english-hungarian> and it gave dementia, insanity and lunacy as definitions.

Paul Blumstein
Los Angeles


elmebaj #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

I am not a doctor either but would agree with David Sencer that "elmebaj"
was likely used as a general word to describe senile dementia or mental
feebleness associated with old age. In my Orszagh Hungarian-english
dictionary it is translated as "mental disorder" or "insanity".

Judy

Judy Young
Ottawa
jy-abcd@cyberus.ca


Hungary SIG #Hungary elmebaj #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

I am not a doctor either but would agree with David Sencer that "elmebaj"
was likely used as a general word to describe senile dementia or mental
feebleness associated with old age. In my Orszagh Hungarian-english
dictionary it is translated as "mental disorder" or "insanity".

Judy

Judy Young
Ottawa
jy-abcd@cyberus.ca


Re: Acrostic on Gravestone in jewishgen digest: August 25, 2004 #general

Judith27
 

Dear Elsie,
I have several photos of Hebrew gravestones inscribed with acrostic
verses, with the initial letters of each line spelling out the letters of the
deceased's Hebrew name, that I show as examples of this genre of Hebrew
epitaph writing in a talk I give on Hebrew tombstones. One, in particular, using
the Hebrew letters of the name Nachman -- Nun, Chet, Mem, and Nun -- is really
quite a remarkable acrostic literary endeavor. Not only do the four letters of
this name generate and start the lines -- but they are also the first letters
of the four words on the first line, the first letters of the four words on the
last line, and in a display of really extraordinary visual, verbal,
linguistic, and poetic gymnastics, they are also the last letters on each of the
lines. A quadruple acrostic "home run" created >from just 16 words!
I do not know if there was ever a book with suggestions for lines or
even complete acrostic epitaphs, but I do know that at the back of one of the
prayers books I have, _The Complete Artscroll Siddur_ (Nusach Ashkenaz) there is
a three page section entitled "Verses For People's Names." These p'sookim come
from the Hebrew Bible, >from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the various
Prophets. They are arranged alphabetically by first letter, and then by the last
letter, so that someone could recite a line of Scripture combining the first
and last letters of his or her own name when praying. There are ten different
p'sookim given that start with the letter Yud, including one for my first name
Yehudit, with a Yud at the beginning and a Tav at the end that comes, according
to the footnote >from Tehillim, Psalm 146 verse 9.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

Subject: acrostic on gravestone
From: Elsie Duman <chava@voicenet.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 04:07:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

My great-grandmother died and was buried in Philadelphia in 1916. Her grave
is marked with a vertical stone containing an acrostic poem, in Yiddish, of
her name, Genessa. Has anyone seen a similar marker? Was there a book
containing appropriate verses for names? Thanks for any information.

Elsie Duman


Thanks #general

Olga Parker <ogparker@...>
 

I posted two photos of tombstones, wanting translations of the Hebrew
portion on the stones. In the same mail which brought me the information
that I could inform members of the list that my photos were available for
viewing, I had several replies giving me the desired translation, and today
I have had a couple more. I have thanked each person individually, but I
want to say thanks to all those who make this great service available to us
with no language abilities. They all agree on the information provided in
Hebrew on the stones, so I won't need any further translation. What a great
group.

I have made a contribution in thanks to JewishGenerosity.

Olga Parker
reply to: ogparker@rushmore.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Acrostic on Gravestone in jewishgen digest: August 25, 2004 #general

Judith27
 

Dear Elsie,
I have several photos of Hebrew gravestones inscribed with acrostic
verses, with the initial letters of each line spelling out the letters of the
deceased's Hebrew name, that I show as examples of this genre of Hebrew
epitaph writing in a talk I give on Hebrew tombstones. One, in particular, using
the Hebrew letters of the name Nachman -- Nun, Chet, Mem, and Nun -- is really
quite a remarkable acrostic literary endeavor. Not only do the four letters of
this name generate and start the lines -- but they are also the first letters
of the four words on the first line, the first letters of the four words on the
last line, and in a display of really extraordinary visual, verbal,
linguistic, and poetic gymnastics, they are also the last letters on each of the
lines. A quadruple acrostic "home run" created >from just 16 words!
I do not know if there was ever a book with suggestions for lines or
even complete acrostic epitaphs, but I do know that at the back of one of the
prayers books I have, _The Complete Artscroll Siddur_ (Nusach Ashkenaz) there is
a three page section entitled "Verses For People's Names." These p'sookim come
from the Hebrew Bible, >from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the various
Prophets. They are arranged alphabetically by first letter, and then by the last
letter, so that someone could recite a line of Scripture combining the first
and last letters of his or her own name when praying. There are ten different
p'sookim given that start with the letter Yud, including one for my first name
Yehudit, with a Yud at the beginning and a Tav at the end that comes, according
to the footnote >from Tehillim, Psalm 146 verse 9.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

Subject: acrostic on gravestone
From: Elsie Duman <chava@voicenet.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 04:07:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

My great-grandmother died and was buried in Philadelphia in 1916. Her grave
is marked with a vertical stone containing an acrostic poem, in Yiddish, of
her name, Genessa. Has anyone seen a similar marker? Was there a book
containing appropriate verses for names? Thanks for any information.

Elsie Duman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks #general

Olga Parker <ogparker@...>
 

I posted two photos of tombstones, wanting translations of the Hebrew
portion on the stones. In the same mail which brought me the information
that I could inform members of the list that my photos were available for
viewing, I had several replies giving me the desired translation, and today
I have had a couple more. I have thanked each person individually, but I
want to say thanks to all those who make this great service available to us
with no language abilities. They all agree on the information provided in
Hebrew on the stones, so I won't need any further translation. What a great
group.

I have made a contribution in thanks to JewishGenerosity.

Olga Parker
reply to: ogparker@rushmore.com


Dutch Ashkenazi Ethos #general

Aubrey Jacobus <zen28027@...>
 

I have a 100% Polish ancestry : 50 years ago I married into a family with
a 75% Dutch ancestry to some mild eyebrow raising on both sides :
One of the more striking differences I observed in the ethos of both groups
was in the area of " Covert " ( respect ) :
In the Dutch families there was the supreme importance attached to
" Covert " - e.g . to be left out of an invitation to a stone setting by
some remote acquaintance was regarded as an unforgiveable insult.

Was this exceptional ? or typical

Aubrey Jacobus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Dutch Ashkenazi Ethos #general

Aubrey Jacobus <zen28027@...>
 

I have a 100% Polish ancestry : 50 years ago I married into a family with
a 75% Dutch ancestry to some mild eyebrow raising on both sides :
One of the more striking differences I observed in the ethos of both groups
was in the area of " Covert " ( respect ) :
In the Dutch families there was the supreme importance attached to
" Covert " - e.g . to be left out of an invitation to a stone setting by
some remote acquaintance was regarded as an unforgiveable insult.

Was this exceptional ? or typical

Aubrey Jacobus