Date   

Thank you for translating #hungary

amira_m@...
 

I'm sending thanks to those who translated >from Yiddish the marriage invite
of Kroovand.

Amira Mashiah, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Thank you for translating #hungary

amira_m@...
 

I'm sending thanks to those who translated >from Yiddish the marriage invite
of Kroovand.

Amira Mashiah, Israel


Landsmanshaften & Burial Societies #poland

David & Monique Gordon <dmgordonnj@...>
 

Where can I find a list of all the Landsmanshaften & Burial
Societies, associated with particular towns?

I am looking for these pertaining to Ruzhin, Ukraine; & Jalowka,
Poland.

Thanks
David Gordon

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The JGS of New York has a page with various landsmanshaft
lists at http://home.att.net/%7Elandsmanshaft/


Surname TOTH #hungary

Laura Steele <lsteele6@...>
 

Does anyone know the derivation of the surname of Toth? It apparantly is
not a regular word, I looked it up in my Hungarian dictionary.
Thanks,
Laura Steele


Re: Vienna Jewish Records #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

Thank you for this information. My Morgensterns lived
in Nemetujvar (now Gussing, Austria), and one of these
brothers died in Radkersburg.

I, for one, find it very relevant to my research into
this branch of my Jewish Hungarians.

--- Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@gmail.com> wrote:

I know that this is not exactly part of Hungarian
research, but I am
sure that there are quite a few people in this group
whose relatives
moved to Vienna. Also among the "new" records there
are some from
certain Burgenland communities who were at one time
part of Hungary.
The BMD records of the Vienna Jewish community which
span the period
1826 to 1938 were filmed in 1980 by the Family
History Library (FHL)
and have been available >from this source since then.
As far as I know
these films were made >from duplicates that were
located in the Vienna
municipal archives. The original records are still
with the Jewish
community of Vienna.
I understand that the FHL began to film the original
records in 2004
and hundreds of new films are now beginning to show
up on the FHL
website. As a matter of fact many records have
appeared over the last
few weeks and it seems that more are to come. Here
is an abbreviated
partial list of the "new" records.
BMD records, Vienna, 1826-1938, with indexes (over
100 films)
BMD records, Vienna, Turkish (Sephardic) community
Proklamationen (whatever that is) 1913-1937
Versoehnungsbuch (Reconciliation book) 1921-1938
Scheidungsbuch (Divorce book) 1905-1942
Uebergetretene (Conversions), some districts, index
1868-1941.
Geburtsanzeigen (Birth notices) 1893-1937 (196
films!!)
Todesanzeigen (Death notices) 1931-May 1938)
Among the "new" films there are also some BMD
records >from these
communities outside Vienna:
Baden, Horn, Klosterneuburg, St. Poelten,
Ybbs-Amstetten,
Gross Enzersdorf, Lackenbach, Mattersburg,
Eisenstadt, Rechnitz,
Stockerau-Korneuburg.
For complete details visit the FHL website at:
http://www.familysearch.org/, go to the catalogue,
go to place search
and then to Vienna, Jewish records.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Landsmanshaften & Burial Societies #poland

David & Monique Gordon <dmgordonnj@...>
 

Where can I find a list of all the Landsmanshaften & Burial
Societies, associated with particular towns?

I am looking for these pertaining to Ruzhin, Ukraine; & Jalowka,
Poland.

Thanks
David Gordon

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The JGS of New York has a page with various landsmanshaft
lists at http://home.att.net/%7Elandsmanshaft/


Hungary SIG #Hungary Surname TOTH #hungary

Laura Steele <lsteele6@...>
 

Does anyone know the derivation of the surname of Toth? It apparantly is
not a regular word, I looked it up in my Hungarian dictionary.
Thanks,
Laura Steele


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Vienna Jewish Records #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

Thank you for this information. My Morgensterns lived
in Nemetujvar (now Gussing, Austria), and one of these
brothers died in Radkersburg.

I, for one, find it very relevant to my research into
this branch of my Jewish Hungarians.

--- Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@gmail.com> wrote:

I know that this is not exactly part of Hungarian
research, but I am
sure that there are quite a few people in this group
whose relatives
moved to Vienna. Also among the "new" records there
are some from
certain Burgenland communities who were at one time
part of Hungary.
The BMD records of the Vienna Jewish community which
span the period
1826 to 1938 were filmed in 1980 by the Family
History Library (FHL)
and have been available >from this source since then.
As far as I know
these films were made >from duplicates that were
located in the Vienna
municipal archives. The original records are still
with the Jewish
community of Vienna.
I understand that the FHL began to film the original
records in 2004
and hundreds of new films are now beginning to show
up on the FHL
website. As a matter of fact many records have
appeared over the last
few weeks and it seems that more are to come. Here
is an abbreviated
partial list of the "new" records.
BMD records, Vienna, 1826-1938, with indexes (over
100 films)
BMD records, Vienna, Turkish (Sephardic) community
Proklamationen (whatever that is) 1913-1937
Versoehnungsbuch (Reconciliation book) 1921-1938
Scheidungsbuch (Divorce book) 1905-1942
Uebergetretene (Conversions), some districts, index
1868-1941.
Geburtsanzeigen (Birth notices) 1893-1937 (196
films!!)
Todesanzeigen (Death notices) 1931-May 1938)
Among the "new" films there are also some BMD
records >from these
communities outside Vienna:
Baden, Horn, Klosterneuburg, St. Poelten,
Ybbs-Amstetten,
Gross Enzersdorf, Lackenbach, Mattersburg,
Eisenstadt, Rechnitz,
Stockerau-Korneuburg.
For complete details visit the FHL website at:
http://www.familysearch.org/, go to the catalogue,
go to place search
and then to Vienna, Jewish records.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Judy Floam (>from Baltimore - my birth town!) posted as follows:

"Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one of
my mother's brothers)."


Judy has brought up a very interesting question, to which I can respond as
follows.

In fact, not only did the rabbis specify that the Hungarian secular name
Vilmos was a legal kinui for the two Hebrew names Binyamim and Ze'eyv, but
also they specified that these two Hebrew names also had another *Yiddish*
kinui, Volf. That is, for men having the two names Binyamin and Volf,
their Legal Jewish Name would need to be written as: Binyamin haMechune
Volf. And for Ze'eyv, Ze'eyv haMechune Volf. So, here we see there is an
interesting linkage between the two Hebrew names and the Yiddish name Volf.

Another interesting fact: if you visit the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames >

and search for the Hungarian name Vilmos, you will find one listing for
this name by itself, besides the two listings for the name together with
Binyamin and Ze'eyv. And this record for Vilmos alone shows that this
Hungarian secular name is considered to be *equivalent* to the German
secular name Wilhelm and its nickname Willi. Also shown there are
Latin/Latinized names (Villemus and Wilhelmus) which were also *equivalent*
to the Hungarian and German secular names.

The German secular name Wilhelm was a very popular name with Jews
throughout Europe, including Hungary, and some Hungarian Jews substituted
the Hungarian version (Vilmos) of Wilhelm, while others alternatively used
both under different circumstances. Interestingly, the German secular name
William was also widely used throughout Europe, including Hungary, and the
name William was a secular kinui in German-speaking lands (including
Hungary) for many Hebrew names; however, it did not enjoy a *special*
statistical linkage to any specific Hebrew given names in either Germany or
Hungary.

So, Jewish genealogists should draw conclusions >from these
statistical results in doing their research of archival documents.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Judy Floam (>from Baltimore - my birth town!) posted as follows:

"Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one of
my mother's brothers)."


Judy has brought up a very interesting question, to which I can respond as
follows.

In fact, not only did the rabbis specify that the Hungarian secular name
Vilmos was a legal kinui for the two Hebrew names Binyamim and Ze'eyv, but
also they specified that these two Hebrew names also had another *Yiddish*
kinui, Volf. That is, for men having the two names Binyamin and Volf,
their Legal Jewish Name would need to be written as: Binyamin haMechune
Volf. And for Ze'eyv, Ze'eyv haMechune Volf. So, here we see there is an
interesting linkage between the two Hebrew names and the Yiddish name Volf.

Another interesting fact: if you visit the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames >

and search for the Hungarian name Vilmos, you will find one listing for
this name by itself, besides the two listings for the name together with
Binyamin and Ze'eyv. And this record for Vilmos alone shows that this
Hungarian secular name is considered to be *equivalent* to the German
secular name Wilhelm and its nickname Willi. Also shown there are
Latin/Latinized names (Villemus and Wilhelmus) which were also *equivalent*
to the Hungarian and German secular names.

The German secular name Wilhelm was a very popular name with Jews
throughout Europe, including Hungary, and some Hungarian Jews substituted
the Hungarian version (Vilmos) of Wilhelm, while others alternatively used
both under different circumstances. Interestingly, the German secular name
William was also widely used throughout Europe, including Hungary, and the
name William was a secular kinui in German-speaking lands (including
Hungary) for many Hebrew names; however, it did not enjoy a *special*
statistical linkage to any specific Hebrew given names in either Germany or
Hungary.

So, Jewish genealogists should draw conclusions >from these
statistical results in doing their research of archival documents.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Re: h-sig digest: June 15, 2006 #hungary

מירי <micla5@...>
 

hi
My cousin is Naomi Kornfeld married Smuel Weiss >from Dunaszerdahely.
MIRI KLEIN, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: h-sig digest: June 15, 2006 #hungary

מירי <micla5@...>
 

hi
My cousin is Naomi Kornfeld married Smuel Weiss >from Dunaszerdahely.
MIRI KLEIN, Israel


Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

vilmos is the hungarian version of william (in this case the idea of "equivalent" names is quite correct), and likewise of wilhelm, guillaume, and liam. the only reason for linking wilhelm to binyamin/zeev/wolf (see jewishgen archives for why these three names are linked) was originally the similarity of sound , in german, and later on probably just because it was "inherited" that way, because there is no other logical connection to associate them.

in fact, probably the most famous binyamin zeev is a great example of how hungarian jews named their children: theodor herzl. (maybe his parents didn't like yedidiah or velvel?)

i also think that the idea that jewish parents consulted a book of gittin when naming a baby is silly. the names had to have come first, and the books later sought to codify the naming patterns that were already in use. with the popularity of completely non-jewish names (like janos and pisti or geza) following the emancipation, the books of gittin gained importance. (rabbis didn't need a book to remind them that yankel was a diminutive of jacob.)

the point is not whether one individual vilmos had a jewish name of zeev or binyamin, but rather that, given a secular name like vilmos (or arpad or zoltan, or theodor), it is impossible to make any conclusions about their jewish name (without further evidence).


....... klein tamas, toronto

From: "Judy and Gary Floam" <gfloam@netrax.net> wrote:

Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.


Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

Vilmos is the Hungarian equivalent of William. I too
have two great uncles whose names were recorded as
Wolf at birth and were later known as Vilmos, or Vili.

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England

--- Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@netrax.net> wrote:

Just a further thought on this question: does the
name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to
do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the
Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William
(including my father and one of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.
<snip>


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re: Re:The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

vilmos is the hungarian version of william (in this case the idea of "equivalent" names is quite correct), and likewise of wilhelm, guillaume, and liam. the only reason for linking wilhelm to binyamin/zeev/wolf (see jewishgen archives for why these three names are linked) was originally the similarity of sound , in german, and later on probably just because it was "inherited" that way, because there is no other logical connection to associate them.

in fact, probably the most famous binyamin zeev is a great example of how hungarian jews named their children: theodor herzl. (maybe his parents didn't like yedidiah or velvel?)

i also think that the idea that jewish parents consulted a book of gittin when naming a baby is silly. the names had to have come first, and the books later sought to codify the naming patterns that were already in use. with the popularity of completely non-jewish names (like janos and pisti or geza) following the emancipation, the books of gittin gained importance. (rabbis didn't need a book to remind them that yankel was a diminutive of jacob.)

the point is not whether one individual vilmos had a jewish name of zeev or binyamin, but rather that, given a secular name like vilmos (or arpad or zoltan, or theodor), it is impossible to make any conclusions about their jewish name (without further evidence).


....... klein tamas, toronto

From: "Judy and Gary Floam" <gfloam@netrax.net> wrote:

Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re:The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

Vilmos is the Hungarian equivalent of William. I too
have two great uncles whose names were recorded as
Wolf at birth and were later known as Vilmos, or Vili.

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England

--- Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@netrax.net> wrote:

Just a further thought on this question: does the
name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to
do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the
Yiddish-German-English counterparts to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William
(including my father and one of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.
<snip>


Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Katz, Itzik <Itzik.Katz@...>
 

Vilmos has no meaning in Hungarian. The Hungarian word and equivalent
name for Zeev (wolf) is Farkas (Hungarian spelling were s =3D sh). My
great grandfather's Hebrew name was Chaim Zeev and incidentally his
Hungarian name was Farkas. As mentioned many time in the H-SIG there
isn't always a connection between a person's Hebrew name to his
Hungarian one.

Isaac Katz
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Judy and Gary Floam [mailto:gfloam@netrax.net]=20
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2006 6:57 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: Re: Re:[h-sig] The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos

Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts
to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one
of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.




----- Original Message -----
From: Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@wanadoo.fr>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2006 4:14 PM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos

<snip>


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Re:The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Katz, Itzik <Itzik.Katz@...>
 

Vilmos has no meaning in Hungarian. The Hungarian word and equivalent
name for Zeev (wolf) is Farkas (Hungarian spelling were s =3D sh). My
great grandfather's Hebrew name was Chaim Zeev and incidentally his
Hungarian name was Farkas. As mentioned many time in the H-SIG there
isn't always a connection between a person's Hebrew name to his
Hungarian one.

Isaac Katz
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Judy and Gary Floam [mailto:gfloam@netrax.net]=20
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2006 6:57 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: Re: Re:[h-sig] The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos

Just a further thought on this question: does the name "vilmos" have a
meaning in Hungarian? And does it have anything to do with wolves?
"Ze'ev" means wolf in Hebrew and the Yiddish-German-English counterparts
to
that Hebrew name were often Wolf or William (including my father and one
of
my mother's brothers).

Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.




----- Original Message -----
From: Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@wanadoo.fr>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2006 4:14 PM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos

<snip>


Resource Room at IAJGS Conference #southafrica

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times (1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair
glory1@RCN.COM


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Resource Room at IAJGS Conference #southafrica

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times (1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair
glory1@RCN.COM