Date   
November issue of Sharsheret Hadorot #germany

Klausner
 

Shalom,
I am pleased to announce that the November issue of Sharsheret Hadorot, the
*** bilingual *** Journal of the Israel Genealogical Society, just appeared. Below
is the Table of Contents. Thank you, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
Visit our Website: www.isragen.org.il

Sharsheret Hadorot, Vol.19, No.4 November 2005

Rabbis of Solotwina near Stanislau - by Edward Gelles
Sources in Researching the Orenstein Family - by Shmuel Even-Or
The Enigma of the Family Name Souroujon - by Moshe Souroujon
Aaron Frank and Family - by Basil Frank
from Lithuania to Israel Via South Africa - by Beryl Baleson
The Day the Jews Returned to their Shtetl - by Gilda Kurtzman
Never Give Up - by Shalom Bronstein
The Foundling Who Sought and Found Parents, Siblings and an Inheritance - by
Shmuel Shamir
Joy That Turned to Sorrow - by Yehuda Klausner
Yekaterinoslav (Dnepropetrovsk) - by Yehuda Klausner

German SIG #Germany November issue of Sharsheret Hadorot #germany

Klausner
 

Shalom,
I am pleased to announce that the November issue of Sharsheret Hadorot, the
*** bilingual *** Journal of the Israel Genealogical Society, just appeared. Below
is the Table of Contents. Thank you, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
Visit our Website: www.isragen.org.il

Sharsheret Hadorot, Vol.19, No.4 November 2005

Rabbis of Solotwina near Stanislau - by Edward Gelles
Sources in Researching the Orenstein Family - by Shmuel Even-Or
The Enigma of the Family Name Souroujon - by Moshe Souroujon
Aaron Frank and Family - by Basil Frank
from Lithuania to Israel Via South Africa - by Beryl Baleson
The Day the Jews Returned to their Shtetl - by Gilda Kurtzman
Never Give Up - by Shalom Bronstein
The Foundling Who Sought and Found Parents, Siblings and an Inheritance - by
Shmuel Shamir
Joy That Turned to Sorrow - by Yehuda Klausner
Yekaterinoslav (Dnepropetrovsk) - by Yehuda Klausner

POT submitter researcher Alex Salm #germany

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Guys
Does anyone knowhow I can contact Alex SALM, he is a researcher who
submitted 3 POT documents for women who must be my GGAunts who i never
new about, so I wanted to find out how he found out about them and if he
knows any more. Thanks

Ben Forman ben.forman~@btconnect.com manchester UK

MODERATOR NOTE: We ask that native English speakers follow rules of English
grammar, spelling and punctuation when writing to this Forum.

There was a rather extensive discussion of Alex Salm's data in this Forum earlier
this year. Use the archive search engine to find it.
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

German SIG #Germany POT submitter researcher Alex Salm #germany

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Guys
Does anyone knowhow I can contact Alex SALM, he is a researcher who
submitted 3 POT documents for women who must be my GGAunts who i never
new about, so I wanted to find out how he found out about them and if he
knows any more. Thanks

Ben Forman ben.forman~@btconnect.com manchester UK

MODERATOR NOTE: We ask that native English speakers follow rules of English
grammar, spelling and punctuation when writing to this Forum.

There was a rather extensive discussion of Alex Salm's data in this Forum earlier
this year. Use the archive search engine to find it.
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

Research on IGI Listings for Trebic: preliminary findings and a proposal #austria-czech

Elaine and Art <elars@...>
 

As compared to the experience of Henry Waellisch in looking up the
family name DEUTSCH in the IGI, in which he found no entries >from
Trebic, I can contrast my own research.

I have taken the names of those ancestors or their spouses who are in my
SPIRA family file and were born in Trebic (Trebitsch), and looked up
their family names in the IGI. Of the 21 Trebic families in my ancestry
I found 19 families listed in the index.
The total number of individuals listed is 210! (see group listings
below). I have not counted births, marriages or deaths of the same
indiviudals as separate entries. Nor have I separately counted
individuals with duplicate listings. Most names cover a 50-60 year
period in the 1810-1870s I also noticed that a small number of entries
had dates of death recorded in the index, a few even extending into the
early 1940s.

My list breaks down as follows:

BAECK- 15 individuals (births recorded >from 1809-1857);
DURRHEIM-4 (1835-1896) FUERST- 24 (1823-1926);GLASNER- 7( 1868-1885);
GOTTLEIN-6 (1818-1824) GRUENBERGER-6 (1804-1839);KOHNSTEIN- 15 (1815-1862);
KURREIN- 2 (1833, 1840) LEDERER- 6 (1841-1879);ORNSTEIN- 18 (1795-1889);
POLNAUER- 23 (1800-1906) RANZENHOFER-2 (1879); RUBIN- 3 (1876-1891);
SCHNUERMACHER- 9 (1813-1858) SPIRA- 12 (1800-1854); SUBAK- 24 (1816-1857);
TICHA-6 (1853-1867) WALLIS- 7 (1817-1825);WERTHEIMER- 21 (1789-1857)

These results raise the question of what proportion of the rest of the
Trebic Jewish community was similarly submitted. If my experience with
a relatively few number of families is an indication, it must have been
sizeable, perhaps reaching into the low thousands.

I would like to propose that other members of the Austria-Czech SIG,
whose ancestry includes relatives >from Trebic, carry out a similar study
of the data for their families in the IGI listing
(www.familysearch.com). Watch for duplicate and multiple entries for
the same individuals. Even a large family can be researched in a matter
of minutes. If mailed to me I will collate the results and post the
data to the group. Please group the results by family name and numbers
of individuals in each family, and give a range of dates for each
family. Of course, individuals who wish to see the results of their
own distinct research reach the group at large should still send them to
Austria-Czech, but I would appreciate receiving a copy of your findings
as well.

It will then be of interest to compare the cumulative numbers in the IGI
listing to the population figures available for the town during
comparable time periods. The results may be an indicator of the extent
of LDS "collection" and posthumous conversion activity in this one
Moravian town.

Arthur Spira
British Columbia, Canada

Researching: SPIRA of Trebic; WERTHEIMER of Trebic;
ORNSTEIN of Trebic; DUERRHEIM of Trebic;
MAX of Safov (Schaffa)

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Research on IGI Listings for Trebic: preliminary findings and a proposal #austria-czech

Elaine and Art <elars@...>
 

As compared to the experience of Henry Waellisch in looking up the
family name DEUTSCH in the IGI, in which he found no entries >from
Trebic, I can contrast my own research.

I have taken the names of those ancestors or their spouses who are in my
SPIRA family file and were born in Trebic (Trebitsch), and looked up
their family names in the IGI. Of the 21 Trebic families in my ancestry
I found 19 families listed in the index.
The total number of individuals listed is 210! (see group listings
below). I have not counted births, marriages or deaths of the same
indiviudals as separate entries. Nor have I separately counted
individuals with duplicate listings. Most names cover a 50-60 year
period in the 1810-1870s I also noticed that a small number of entries
had dates of death recorded in the index, a few even extending into the
early 1940s.

My list breaks down as follows:

BAECK- 15 individuals (births recorded >from 1809-1857);
DURRHEIM-4 (1835-1896) FUERST- 24 (1823-1926);GLASNER- 7( 1868-1885);
GOTTLEIN-6 (1818-1824) GRUENBERGER-6 (1804-1839);KOHNSTEIN- 15 (1815-1862);
KURREIN- 2 (1833, 1840) LEDERER- 6 (1841-1879);ORNSTEIN- 18 (1795-1889);
POLNAUER- 23 (1800-1906) RANZENHOFER-2 (1879); RUBIN- 3 (1876-1891);
SCHNUERMACHER- 9 (1813-1858) SPIRA- 12 (1800-1854); SUBAK- 24 (1816-1857);
TICHA-6 (1853-1867) WALLIS- 7 (1817-1825);WERTHEIMER- 21 (1789-1857)

These results raise the question of what proportion of the rest of the
Trebic Jewish community was similarly submitted. If my experience with
a relatively few number of families is an indication, it must have been
sizeable, perhaps reaching into the low thousands.

I would like to propose that other members of the Austria-Czech SIG,
whose ancestry includes relatives >from Trebic, carry out a similar study
of the data for their families in the IGI listing
(www.familysearch.com). Watch for duplicate and multiple entries for
the same individuals. Even a large family can be researched in a matter
of minutes. If mailed to me I will collate the results and post the
data to the group. Please group the results by family name and numbers
of individuals in each family, and give a range of dates for each
family. Of course, individuals who wish to see the results of their
own distinct research reach the group at large should still send them to
Austria-Czech, but I would appreciate receiving a copy of your findings
as well.

It will then be of interest to compare the cumulative numbers in the IGI
listing to the population figures available for the town during
comparable time periods. The results may be an indicator of the extent
of LDS "collection" and posthumous conversion activity in this one
Moravian town.

Arthur Spira
British Columbia, Canada

Researching: SPIRA of Trebic; WERTHEIMER of Trebic;
ORNSTEIN of Trebic; DUERRHEIM of Trebic;
MAX of Safov (Schaffa)

Trebic memorial on Viewmate VM7147 #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

Recent exchanges about Trebic and Celia Male's suggestion have prompted me to
place a photograph on Viewmate. The item is numbered VM7147 and you can
navigate there via this address
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

It is a photo of a memorial in the Trebic cemetary to local Jews who had served
and lost their lives in World War 1. You'll find some names familiar to this
list. Also listed is the person's rank, unit? and place of death.

I took this photo and a few others of headstones in August this past summer.
Please email me directly with questions.

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville ON
Canada

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Trebic memorial on Viewmate VM7147 #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

Recent exchanges about Trebic and Celia Male's suggestion have prompted me to
place a photograph on Viewmate. The item is numbered VM7147 and you can
navigate there via this address
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

It is a photo of a memorial in the Trebic cemetary to local Jews who had served
and lost their lives in World War 1. You'll find some names familiar to this
list. Also listed is the person's rank, unit? and place of death.

I took this photo and a few others of headstones in August this past summer.
Please email me directly with questions.

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville ON
Canada

Is Isserlein to Israel as Schando is to Alexander? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I was amused at Fritz Neubauer's apt comment that
"Xandl" was Viennese dialect for Alexander: Could she
possibly said "Xandl" (pronounced something like
"k-sandal" which may sound like "sh ..." at the
beginning for English ears, and the Viennese "l" at
the end can also sound more like an English o-sound.
The authoritative dictionary for Austrian usage, the
"Oesterreichisches Worterbuch", 38th edition, 1997,
has the following entry on page 694: Xandl
(maennlicher Vorname):

Researching a completely different topic, I have just
found this
re ISSERLEIN (ISSERLIN), Israel ben Pethahiah
Ashkenazi:

NB long URL - cut and paste in its entirety into your
browser.

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=365&
letter=I&search=isserlin

or try this: http://tinyurl.com/d9n62 which does work
on the second step!

We rarely write about the genealogy of medieval Jews
in Austria - so here goes: Isserlein was the foremost
Talmudic authority of Germany in the first half of the
fifteenth century; born ca 1490-1500 probably at
Ratisbon; died at Neustadt, nr Vienna, 1460. He
belonged to an established family of scholars: his
paternal gt-grandfather was Israel of Krems, author of
the "Haggahot Asheri"; and his maternal uncle was the
martyr Aaron Blumlein....

If you read the last sentence it says: Isserlein is a
pet name for Israel. How delightful that this foremost
scholar has a petname - probably given to him as a
toddler in Krems by his loving parents - by which he
is still known today.
Unfortunately, I have not yet found the location of
ISSERLEIN's grave in 1460 - I presume it was in Wiener
Neustadt where medieval Jewish graves have been
discovered.

Prof. Esterson will no doubt tell us if this "pet name
theory" is incorrect; Fritz Neubauer will let us know
how ISSERLEIN was pronounced in 1400s Krems and Vienna
and I am sure Traude Triebel will be out with her
camera in Wiener Neustadt looking for his medieval
grave.

Hurrah for our SIG and all the expertise we have,
collectively.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote:

You can also read about Isserlein's sojourn in
Slovenia here:
http://www.centropa.org/traveltips.asp?ID=6700&TypeID=36658

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Is Isserlein to Israel as Schando is to Alexander? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I was amused at Fritz Neubauer's apt comment that
"Xandl" was Viennese dialect for Alexander: Could she
possibly said "Xandl" (pronounced something like
"k-sandal" which may sound like "sh ..." at the
beginning for English ears, and the Viennese "l" at
the end can also sound more like an English o-sound.
The authoritative dictionary for Austrian usage, the
"Oesterreichisches Worterbuch", 38th edition, 1997,
has the following entry on page 694: Xandl
(maennlicher Vorname):

Researching a completely different topic, I have just
found this
re ISSERLEIN (ISSERLIN), Israel ben Pethahiah
Ashkenazi:

NB long URL - cut and paste in its entirety into your
browser.

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=365&
letter=I&search=isserlin

or try this: http://tinyurl.com/d9n62 which does work
on the second step!

We rarely write about the genealogy of medieval Jews
in Austria - so here goes: Isserlein was the foremost
Talmudic authority of Germany in the first half of the
fifteenth century; born ca 1490-1500 probably at
Ratisbon; died at Neustadt, nr Vienna, 1460. He
belonged to an established family of scholars: his
paternal gt-grandfather was Israel of Krems, author of
the "Haggahot Asheri"; and his maternal uncle was the
martyr Aaron Blumlein....

If you read the last sentence it says: Isserlein is a
pet name for Israel. How delightful that this foremost
scholar has a petname - probably given to him as a
toddler in Krems by his loving parents - by which he
is still known today.
Unfortunately, I have not yet found the location of
ISSERLEIN's grave in 1460 - I presume it was in Wiener
Neustadt where medieval Jewish graves have been
discovered.

Prof. Esterson will no doubt tell us if this "pet name
theory" is incorrect; Fritz Neubauer will let us know
how ISSERLEIN was pronounced in 1400s Krems and Vienna
and I am sure Traude Triebel will be out with her
camera in Wiener Neustadt looking for his medieval
grave.

Hurrah for our SIG and all the expertise we have,
collectively.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote:

You can also read about Isserlein's sojourn in
Slovenia here:
http://www.centropa.org/traveltips.asp?ID=6700&TypeID=36658

How to contact submitter to Yad Vashem names database? #belarus

DElliot874@...
 

I searched the Yad Vashem names database for "ziklik", and came across many
names submitted by 'Zelig Shakhar/Shuster'. Any suggestions for locating him?
Are there any Israeli whitepage websites in English?

David Ekelchik
Teaneck, New Jersey
Searching: ZIKLIK, SICKLICK, TZIKLIK, MEDVEDEV >from Lenin and Mikszawice

Belarus SIG #Belarus How to contact submitter to Yad Vashem names database? #belarus

DElliot874@...
 

I searched the Yad Vashem names database for "ziklik", and came across many
names submitted by 'Zelig Shakhar/Shuster'. Any suggestions for locating him?
Are there any Israeli whitepage websites in English?

David Ekelchik
Teaneck, New Jersey
Searching: ZIKLIK, SICKLICK, TZIKLIK, MEDVEDEV >from Lenin and Mikszawice

SHAEVITZ, MOSHOVITZ from Novogrudok #belarus

rshaevitz <rshaevitz@...>
 

Both of my parents lived in Novogrudok (which has numerous spelling) which
was approximately 50 miles south west of Minsk.

My father's Americanized name is SHAEVITZ. My mother's Americanized name
is MOSHOVITZ (both are spelled numerous ways). They left Novogrudok
around 1914 by way of Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, and settling in
Cleveland, Ohio. I would appreciate any information of anyone have
relatives in Novogrudok and if my parents names are familiar to someone.

I appreciate your help.

Robert M. Shaevitz
Cape Coral, Fl 33914

Belarus SIG #Belarus SHAEVITZ, MOSHOVITZ from Novogrudok #belarus

rshaevitz <rshaevitz@...>
 

Both of my parents lived in Novogrudok (which has numerous spelling) which
was approximately 50 miles south west of Minsk.

My father's Americanized name is SHAEVITZ. My mother's Americanized name
is MOSHOVITZ (both are spelled numerous ways). They left Novogrudok
around 1914 by way of Bremen, Germany to Baltimore, and settling in
Cleveland, Ohio. I would appreciate any information of anyone have
relatives in Novogrudok and if my parents names are familiar to someone.

I appreciate your help.

Robert M. Shaevitz
Cape Coral, Fl 33914

Jewishs school in Gravesend? #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

I have been researching my Aarons family lately and have found the following
family in the 1871 census, who I believe are related to me:

109 Leman Street, Whitechapel, 1871
Perry Aarons Head 42 Cigar Dealer b.Vauxhall
Rachel " Wife 47 Greenwich
Mary " Dau. 15 Liverpool
Henry " Son 14 Gravesend, Essex
John " " 12 Whitechapel
Rachel " Dau. 10 "
Perry " Son 9 "
Louis " " 8 St. Georges
Joseph " " 7 Whitechapel

I was intrigued by the reference to Gravesend and when I did a search of the
1871 census I came up with what looks like a Jewish school in Milton,
Gravesend, Kent:

Perry Aarons abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Jacob Bamberger abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Emmanuel Berg abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Joseph Bernstein abt 1861 Dowlais, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Lewis Bernstine abt 1860 Donbail, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Benjamin Blasberg abt 1859 Cardiff, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Emmanuel Cohen abt 1860 Liverpool, Lancashire, England Pupil Milton Kent
Davie Davis abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Henry Harris abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
David W Lyons abt 1859 Cardiff, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Lewis Marks abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Simon Marks abt 1859 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Joseph Prag abt 1860 Liverpool, Lancashire, England Pupil Milton Kent
Harvey H Salamon abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Harry Say abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent

(The same Perry Aarons seems to appear in two places on the census). On the
next page the names of the staff are given.
It is interesting that all these boys were a similar age.

Does anyone know anything about this school, or a Jewish community in this
area at this time?

Regards, Lois Kaufman

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Jewishs school in Gravesend? #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

I have been researching my Aarons family lately and have found the following
family in the 1871 census, who I believe are related to me:

109 Leman Street, Whitechapel, 1871
Perry Aarons Head 42 Cigar Dealer b.Vauxhall
Rachel " Wife 47 Greenwich
Mary " Dau. 15 Liverpool
Henry " Son 14 Gravesend, Essex
John " " 12 Whitechapel
Rachel " Dau. 10 "
Perry " Son 9 "
Louis " " 8 St. Georges
Joseph " " 7 Whitechapel

I was intrigued by the reference to Gravesend and when I did a search of the
1871 census I came up with what looks like a Jewish school in Milton,
Gravesend, Kent:

Perry Aarons abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Jacob Bamberger abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Emmanuel Berg abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Joseph Bernstein abt 1861 Dowlais, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Lewis Bernstine abt 1860 Donbail, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Benjamin Blasberg abt 1859 Cardiff, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Emmanuel Cohen abt 1860 Liverpool, Lancashire, England Pupil Milton Kent
Davie Davis abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Henry Harris abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
David W Lyons abt 1859 Cardiff, Wales Pupil Milton Kent
Lewis Marks abt 1861 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Simon Marks abt 1859 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Joseph Prag abt 1860 Liverpool, Lancashire, England Pupil Milton Kent
Harvey H Salamon abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent
Harry Say abt 1860 London, Middlesex, England Pupil Milton Kent

(The same Perry Aarons seems to appear in two places on the census). On the
next page the names of the staff are given.
It is interesting that all these boys were a similar age.

Does anyone know anything about this school, or a Jewish community in this
area at this time?

Regards, Lois Kaufman

Re: Three Naming questions #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Steve Franklin of Baltimore (my old home town!) posted as follows:

"All brothers gave surname Benjamin on arrival in UK. I have so far not
| been able to find any references to the name Benjamin in Lithuania, where
| they originated according to naturalization papers. I have also looked under
| Binyomin etc. to no avail. Doe anyone have any suggestions how to proceed
| back?

>from my own experience with given names (not surnames, but the same logic may
apply), "Benjamin" can be used interchangeably with Beynes, Beinis, Benesh, and
even Berman. My great-grandfather and the person after whom he was named used
all of these variations, or at least were referred to by all of them."


The Hebrew given name Binyamin had a number of Yiddish kinuim which were
attached to the Hebrew name, such that they were to be written together in
legal Jewish papers (like a Get, Ketuva, etc.). Some of these Yiddish
kinuim were: Benya, Beynesh, Beynush, Bunami, Bunem, Bunma, Volf, and Wolf.

Usually, in the home, Jewish community, and frequently in non-Jewish
environments the Yiddish names were used between people, rather than the
Hebrew names. Perhaps this was because Jews had a reverence for Hebrew
names and the Hebrew Language in general, and it was felt that one should
use this holy tongue (Lashon Kodesh) only for holy matters. In addition,
there was a rabbinic dictum which stated that one must never spell (in
Hebrew) Hebrew names (like Avraham, Yitschak, Miryam, etc.) in any way
which differs >from their spelling in the Tanach.

In effect, Yiddish and Yiddish names became a loazi (secular) language and
secular names, and they were treated as such by Jews. In other words,
Yiddish names and secular names (like the German names Albert, Alfred,
etc.) obeyed the same regulations written in Hilchot Gitin law books.

These restrictions did not hold for surnames, and in general Jews were free
to adopt such names as they wished to adopt, subject to some limitations
which were placed on them by some civil authorities.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Three Naming questions #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Steve Franklin of Baltimore (my old home town!) posted as follows:

"All brothers gave surname Benjamin on arrival in UK. I have so far not
| been able to find any references to the name Benjamin in Lithuania, where
| they originated according to naturalization papers. I have also looked under
| Binyomin etc. to no avail. Doe anyone have any suggestions how to proceed
| back?

>from my own experience with given names (not surnames, but the same logic may
apply), "Benjamin" can be used interchangeably with Beynes, Beinis, Benesh, and
even Berman. My great-grandfather and the person after whom he was named used
all of these variations, or at least were referred to by all of them."


The Hebrew given name Binyamin had a number of Yiddish kinuim which were
attached to the Hebrew name, such that they were to be written together in
legal Jewish papers (like a Get, Ketuva, etc.). Some of these Yiddish
kinuim were: Benya, Beynesh, Beynush, Bunami, Bunem, Bunma, Volf, and Wolf.

Usually, in the home, Jewish community, and frequently in non-Jewish
environments the Yiddish names were used between people, rather than the
Hebrew names. Perhaps this was because Jews had a reverence for Hebrew
names and the Hebrew Language in general, and it was felt that one should
use this holy tongue (Lashon Kodesh) only for holy matters. In addition,
there was a rabbinic dictum which stated that one must never spell (in
Hebrew) Hebrew names (like Avraham, Yitschak, Miryam, etc.) in any way
which differs >from their spelling in the Tanach.

In effect, Yiddish and Yiddish names became a loazi (secular) language and
secular names, and they were treated as such by Jews. In other words,
Yiddish names and secular names (like the German names Albert, Alfred,
etc.) obeyed the same regulations written in Hilchot Gitin law books.

These restrictions did not hold for surnames, and in general Jews were free
to adopt such names as they wished to adopt, subject to some limitations
which were placed on them by some civil authorities.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

Litvaks. :-) #lithuania

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Meri-Jane Rochelson wrote:
.>
As a proud Litvak married to the son of a "mixed marriage"--
Litvak/Galitzianer--I would be sad to see the memory of this distinction
fade. <SNIP>
By the way, most Litvaks I speak with assume that it was always recognized
that we were the more intellectual and scholarly of Ashkenazic Jews. But a
very well-educated Jewish friend >from a Galitzianer background once told me
that in his family they always assumed the opposite.
When I started tracing the genealogy of my Litvak side, a cousin, to whom
the fact we were Lithuanian was news (Everyone always said we were from
"Russia"), told this fact to her Rabbi. His response was that this meant
she was a "Litvak". She asked what that meant. His response was "It means
you married down". <GRIN>

Sam Schleman

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Litvaks. :-) #lithuania

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Meri-Jane Rochelson wrote:
.>
As a proud Litvak married to the son of a "mixed marriage"--
Litvak/Galitzianer--I would be sad to see the memory of this distinction
fade. <SNIP>
By the way, most Litvaks I speak with assume that it was always recognized
that we were the more intellectual and scholarly of Ashkenazic Jews. But a
very well-educated Jewish friend >from a Galitzianer background once told me
that in his family they always assumed the opposite.
When I started tracing the genealogy of my Litvak side, a cousin, to whom
the fact we were Lithuanian was news (Everyone always said we were from
"Russia"), told this fact to her Rabbi. His response was that this meant
she was a "Litvak". She asked what that meant. His response was "It means
you married down". <GRIN>

Sam Schleman