Date   

Gorzkowice Records #poland

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

If there are any records, they would be located at the Piotrkow Archive.

Archiwum Panstwowe w Piotrkowie Trybunalskim
ul. Torunska 4
97-300 Piotrkow Trybunalski
tel: (44) 649-69-71
fax: 649-69-71
email: kancelaria@...
www.piotrkow-tryb.ap.gov.pl

However, during a search on the Polish State Archives website, I did
not find any.

On the other hand, you are in luck, as there are Books of Residents
[ksiegi ludnosci stalej] there for Gorzkowice for 1902-1931.

See: http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/ela.php?l=en and type in
Gorzkowice.

My grandmother and her family lived for a time in Gorzkowice in the
mid-1800s (prior to when they moved to Zychlin), when my great-
grandfather Toronczyk was a melamed there.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Sandek listed on birth records #poland

Renee Stevens <brstevens@...>
 

I am poring over birth records recently received >from AGAD for the towns of
Zniesienie and Mosty Wielkie. I note that the name of the Sandek is often
repeated for several births in a family. The German label for this record
entry is: "der Pathen oder Zeugen des Sandek oder Schames". I have several
questions about that:

1. What is the translation for that entry? My German is very primitive
(primarily based on childhood Yiddish) but it suggests that the record
could show either the sandek or the schames. What is the correct
translation?

2. What is the likelihood that a sandek or schames would be a family
relation or friend? If so, would this be another angle with which to extend
the genealogy search?

3. Does anyone know of any particular cultural patterns that may have
been specific to this area of Austro-Hungary (Lemberg/Lvov and vicinity)?

Many thanks
Renee Glattstein Stevens
Bethesda, MD

searching:
GLATTSTEIN/GLATSTEIN (Lvov)
WOLF (Lvov, Vienna)
SELIGMAN (Mosty Wielkie, Sokal, Lvov, Vienna)
ROSENGARTEN (Mosty Wielkie)
TENNENBAUM/TENENBAUM (Nieznanov, Lvov)
PARNES (Nieznanov, Lvov, Tarnopol)


JRI Poland #Poland Gorzkowice Records #poland

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

If there are any records, they would be located at the Piotrkow Archive.

Archiwum Panstwowe w Piotrkowie Trybunalskim
ul. Torunska 4
97-300 Piotrkow Trybunalski
tel: (44) 649-69-71
fax: 649-69-71
email: kancelaria@...
www.piotrkow-tryb.ap.gov.pl

However, during a search on the Polish State Archives website, I did
not find any.

On the other hand, you are in luck, as there are Books of Residents
[ksiegi ludnosci stalej] there for Gorzkowice for 1902-1931.

See: http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/ela.php?l=en and type in
Gorzkowice.

My grandmother and her family lived for a time in Gorzkowice in the
mid-1800s (prior to when they moved to Zychlin), when my great-
grandfather Toronczyk was a melamed there.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


JRI Poland #Poland Sandek listed on birth records #poland

Renee Stevens <brstevens@...>
 

I am poring over birth records recently received >from AGAD for the towns of
Zniesienie and Mosty Wielkie. I note that the name of the Sandek is often
repeated for several births in a family. The German label for this record
entry is: "der Pathen oder Zeugen des Sandek oder Schames". I have several
questions about that:

1. What is the translation for that entry? My German is very primitive
(primarily based on childhood Yiddish) but it suggests that the record
could show either the sandek or the schames. What is the correct
translation?

2. What is the likelihood that a sandek or schames would be a family
relation or friend? If so, would this be another angle with which to extend
the genealogy search?

3. Does anyone know of any particular cultural patterns that may have
been specific to this area of Austro-Hungary (Lemberg/Lvov and vicinity)?

Many thanks
Renee Glattstein Stevens
Bethesda, MD

searching:
GLATTSTEIN/GLATSTEIN (Lvov)
WOLF (Lvov, Vienna)
SELIGMAN (Mosty Wielkie, Sokal, Lvov, Vienna)
ROSENGARTEN (Mosty Wielkie)
TENNENBAUM/TENENBAUM (Nieznanov, Lvov)
PARNES (Nieznanov, Lvov, Tarnopol)


Obituary help #general

AREACO@...
 

Dear Jenners,

I volunteered for Random Acts of Kindness. My first request was to find an
obituary for Cleaves Albert Jones who died in Los Angeles (my home town) in
1951. I have no idea where to start. I have his death data. Supposedly he
was in WWI as a flyer but I can find no record. He died at 55. There is no
SSDI record. We have a huge Veterans Administration which includes hospitals
and housing. I tried the LA Times but could not figure out how to get old
obituaries.

Any suggestions? I would really like to help the person who asked for my
help.

Thanks,
Anita Arkin
Tarzana


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Obituary help #general

AREACO@...
 

Dear Jenners,

I volunteered for Random Acts of Kindness. My first request was to find an
obituary for Cleaves Albert Jones who died in Los Angeles (my home town) in
1951. I have no idea where to start. I have his death data. Supposedly he
was in WWI as a flyer but I can find no record. He died at 55. There is no
SSDI record. We have a huge Veterans Administration which includes hospitals
and housing. I tried the LA Times but could not figure out how to get old
obituaries.

Any suggestions? I would really like to help the person who asked for my
help.

Thanks,
Anita Arkin
Tarzana


re which French & Swiss archives to contact #france

Bea <blspabas@...>
 

many thanks for your reply, Georges & the Moderator.

Unfortunately the cdhf.net link doesn't appear to work. So I tried the
moderator's links at the bottom of my last post to this SIG.

The rules do not seem to mention anything about naturalisation records or
files. I am hoping you might be able to email me to tell me how I could
find out if there are any nat files for my family in France (and
Switzerland). Here in the UK, as long as one is a member of the National
Archives in Kew, one can request the file after tapping in the names one is
looking for in their online catalogue - the UK files would then either be
open and one could then read them in the archives/by paying for them to be
sent by post or email, or if closed, request a review by asking the national
archives if they could open these under the freedom of information act,
then, about 6 weeks later, as long as the archives open the files, again
they then can be read.

I am hoping the French and Swiss methods are similar, and would like to ask
if you know of someone who can help me with this.

My family were released >from Siberia in 1956. >from what I have been able to
establish >from Latvia, that is where the family returned to after 1956, but
after about 1990-1992, the family emigrated. Latvia will not tell me to
where, even though these surely are exceptional circumstances and they have
all relevant information and proof of relationship >from me. For 68 years my
family thought our Latvian cousins were dead. I now know they were alive at
least up until 1992. I hope in the long term to find them. I have put the
surnames in JGFF and other places, but finding a naturalisation file would
help me as I suspect they changed their names.

Mod- thank you for the other web links to the "rules" page, but if possible,
regarding death certs, I do not know if any of my missing family have died,
but if a death cert is found then I will know at least if today they are
dead or alive, as well as knowing where the family lived after c.1991. The
problem is I do not know for sure if it was France or Switzerland the family
emigrated to, but these countries have been suggested to me by others to
try. I do not know where in France or Switzerland any deaths may have
occured either. So given this, which City Hall do I write to?!

I have had help >from a number of German, UK, American and Israeli tracing
orgs but the family did not live/ are not in any of these countries.

Many thanks for your help,

B.Shiel (London) blspabas@...


French SIG #France re which French & Swiss archives to contact #france

Bea <blspabas@...>
 

many thanks for your reply, Georges & the Moderator.

Unfortunately the cdhf.net link doesn't appear to work. So I tried the
moderator's links at the bottom of my last post to this SIG.

The rules do not seem to mention anything about naturalisation records or
files. I am hoping you might be able to email me to tell me how I could
find out if there are any nat files for my family in France (and
Switzerland). Here in the UK, as long as one is a member of the National
Archives in Kew, one can request the file after tapping in the names one is
looking for in their online catalogue - the UK files would then either be
open and one could then read them in the archives/by paying for them to be
sent by post or email, or if closed, request a review by asking the national
archives if they could open these under the freedom of information act,
then, about 6 weeks later, as long as the archives open the files, again
they then can be read.

I am hoping the French and Swiss methods are similar, and would like to ask
if you know of someone who can help me with this.

My family were released >from Siberia in 1956. >from what I have been able to
establish >from Latvia, that is where the family returned to after 1956, but
after about 1990-1992, the family emigrated. Latvia will not tell me to
where, even though these surely are exceptional circumstances and they have
all relevant information and proof of relationship >from me. For 68 years my
family thought our Latvian cousins were dead. I now know they were alive at
least up until 1992. I hope in the long term to find them. I have put the
surnames in JGFF and other places, but finding a naturalisation file would
help me as I suspect they changed their names.

Mod- thank you for the other web links to the "rules" page, but if possible,
regarding death certs, I do not know if any of my missing family have died,
but if a death cert is found then I will know at least if today they are
dead or alive, as well as knowing where the family lived after c.1991. The
problem is I do not know for sure if it was France or Switzerland the family
emigrated to, but these countries have been suggested to me by others to
try. I do not know where in France or Switzerland any deaths may have
occured either. So given this, which City Hall do I write to?!

I have had help >from a number of German, UK, American and Israeli tracing
orgs but the family did not live/ are not in any of these countries.

Many thanks for your help,

B.Shiel (London) blspabas@...


Re : frenchsig digest: November 22, 2008; naturalizations #france

Ajzenberg Michel <miajzenberg@...>
 

Concerning naturalization you should precise that there are two level of
difficulties to get information. If you are searching basic information
(first name, last name, birth date, naturalization date...), it is very
easy to get them on the Net.
What is difficult is to get the full document.

Regards
Michel
France


French SIG #France Re : frenchsig digest: November 22, 2008; naturalizations #france

Ajzenberg Michel <miajzenberg@...>
 

Concerning naturalization you should precise that there are two level of
difficulties to get information. If you are searching basic information
(first name, last name, birth date, naturalization date...), it is very
easy to get them on the Net.
What is difficult is to get the full document.

Regards
Michel
France


Circ, Slovakia -- please look at this!! #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Dear All,

I'm in the process of having a website created for my genealogy "stuff".
Tonight I happened to google the town of CIRC, the ancestral village
of my HUEBSCHMAN family.

There is a CIRC website where a Dr. Mary Maddock has listed ALL the
inhabitants and their house numbers >from the 1869 census. It is
copyrighted in 2005. I have copies of all the Jewish inhabitants >from
this census. Surprisingly, every JEWISH house number on her otherwise
very complete ist is listed as "vacant".

Just thought you might find this of interest!

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, OH


Hungary SIG #Hungary Circ, Slovakia -- please look at this!! #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Dear All,

I'm in the process of having a website created for my genealogy "stuff".
Tonight I happened to google the town of CIRC, the ancestral village
of my HUEBSCHMAN family.

There is a CIRC website where a Dr. Mary Maddock has listed ALL the
inhabitants and their house numbers >from the 1869 census. It is
copyrighted in 2005. I have copies of all the Jewish inhabitants >from
this census. Surprisingly, every JEWISH house number on her otherwise
very complete ist is listed as "vacant".

Just thought you might find this of interest!

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, OH


Re: K. FAYERSHTEYN - Is this name part of your family? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 11/23/2008 12:47:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
dobrins@... writes:
<< Is the name K. Fayershteyn part of your family? I have a L'Shana Tova
postcard >from 1928 sent >from the Fayershteyn family.>>

The German original spelling of that name is Feuerstein, meaning flint
[stone]. The literal meaning is fire stone. An alternate German spelling of
the surname might be Feierstein. I notice you have listed the Firestone and
Feirstein variants. There may be many more variant spellings of the name.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: K. FAYERSHTEYN - Is this name part of your family? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 11/23/2008 12:47:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
dobrins@... writes:
<< Is the name K. Fayershteyn part of your family? I have a L'Shana Tova
postcard >from 1928 sent >from the Fayershteyn family.>>

The German original spelling of that name is Feuerstein, meaning flint
[stone]. The literal meaning is fire stone. An alternate German spelling of
the surname might be Feierstein. I notice you have listed the Firestone and
Feirstein variants. There may be many more variant spellings of the name.

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Cabinet Portrait #germany

MBernet@...
 

My Random House CD-Rom Dictionary defines Cabinet Portrait as
a small easel painting, usually under 3 ft. wide, formerly exhibited
in a cabinet(i.e., special room). The date for initial usage of the term
is given as 1815 - 1825.

In the initial years of photography, portrait photographers aspired
to a status equivalent to that of portrait painters. They appropriated
the language of painters, the style and size of portraits, and phrases
from "respected" languages (English, French, Italian, Latin . . . )
to add prestige to their calling.

It is not surprising to find a German portrait photographer using a
term >from portrait painting taken >from a foreign language to
enhance the client's appreciation of the artistry of his work.

You might wish to google "Cabinet Portrait Photograph" or look it up
on Wikipedia. A rapid search told me that the term was first applied
for photography in 1866, by London photographer Frederick Richard
Window, who had introduced the Carte de Visite format in 1864.
The cabinet portrait was a photographic print mounted on a sturdy
card measuring 4 and one quarter inches by 6 and one half inches.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@...

In a message dated 11/22/2008 ellencleary@... writes:
"I have 2 scans of photographs of people who are unknown to me which my
cousin sent me. I have assumed they are pictures of my ggf and his
family. Someone drew my attention to the writing at the bottom of one
of the photos, Cabinet Portrait, written in English. My ggf was born
in Prussia in about 1832 and >from what I have learned about Cabinet
Portraits, they first appeared in 1866, when my ggf would already have
been an adult. I do not think the people in these photos are my
ggparents. I am most curious about whether these pictures could have
been taken in Germany, despite the fact that Cabinet Portrait appears on
the photo in English."


German SIG #Germany Re: Cabinet Portrait #germany

MBernet@...
 

My Random House CD-Rom Dictionary defines Cabinet Portrait as
a small easel painting, usually under 3 ft. wide, formerly exhibited
in a cabinet(i.e., special room). The date for initial usage of the term
is given as 1815 - 1825.

In the initial years of photography, portrait photographers aspired
to a status equivalent to that of portrait painters. They appropriated
the language of painters, the style and size of portraits, and phrases
from "respected" languages (English, French, Italian, Latin . . . )
to add prestige to their calling.

It is not surprising to find a German portrait photographer using a
term >from portrait painting taken >from a foreign language to
enhance the client's appreciation of the artistry of his work.

You might wish to google "Cabinet Portrait Photograph" or look it up
on Wikipedia. A rapid search told me that the term was first applied
for photography in 1866, by London photographer Frederick Richard
Window, who had introduced the Carte de Visite format in 1864.
The cabinet portrait was a photographic print mounted on a sturdy
card measuring 4 and one quarter inches by 6 and one half inches.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@...

In a message dated 11/22/2008 ellencleary@... writes:
"I have 2 scans of photographs of people who are unknown to me which my
cousin sent me. I have assumed they are pictures of my ggf and his
family. Someone drew my attention to the writing at the bottom of one
of the photos, Cabinet Portrait, written in English. My ggf was born
in Prussia in about 1832 and >from what I have learned about Cabinet
Portraits, they first appeared in 1866, when my ggf would already have
been an adult. I do not think the people in these photos are my
ggparents. I am most curious about whether these pictures could have
been taken in Germany, despite the fact that Cabinet Portrait appears on
the photo in English."


Re: Female given names Cluwa, Sluwa, Slawa #general

Gary Mokotoff: <mokotoff@...>
 

--Original Message--
According to "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names" by Alexander Beider,
the female given names Cluwa, Sluwa and Slawa are all variants of Tislave.
The name is borrowed >from Slavic Christians and in Slavic means "glory."

They are rare names among Jews.

Gary Mokotoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Female given names Cluwa, Sluwa, Slawa #general

Gary Mokotoff: <mokotoff@...>
 

--Original Message--
According to "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names" by Alexander Beider,
the female given names Cluwa, Sluwa and Slawa are all variants of Tislave.
The name is borrowed >from Slavic Christians and in Slavic means "glory."

They are rare names among Jews.

Gary Mokotoff


Re: Questions about Crypto-Jews #general

Judy Simon
 

Ava Cohn wrote:
I also agree with Tom that DNA testing might add some clues. But, again, not
completely definitive.
Ava Cohn
Long Grove, IL
Searching: SHENKMAN/FRIEDMAN/SELIGMAN: Vitebsk gubernia, Bel>Riga
COHN/ABRAMOWITZ: Botosani, Bucharesti>Montreal>Israel;
HANDELMAN/GANDELMAN/STERN/FISCHMANN Shpikow, Bratslav, Ukr.
HAMMER Krasne Ilske, Ukr.; Czernovitsi>Montreal
ABRAMS/ABROMOWITZ Odessa>Paterson, NJ
Ava, I notice you are researching several families >from Vitebsk
gubernia and also have an interest in researching Sephardic history in
Spain. Do you have any indications that any of the families you are
researching >from Vitebsk gubernia might have had Sephardic ancestry?

The reason I ask is that my maternal grandfather >from Rezekne (in
Vitebsk gubernia) and another family I have been in contact with with
recent ancestry >from Daugavpils (also in Vitebsk gub) have oral
histories that their paternal ancestors were >from Spain. We were
wondering if there could have been a small community of Sephardic
descendants who settled in Vitebsk gubernia. Eventually, they were
absorbed into the Ashkenazi culture, and retained little or none of
their Sephardic customs.

A few years ago I started a Y-DNA project at Family Tree DNA with
Schelly Talalay Dardashti for Ashkenazi Jews who have some indication
that their paternal ancestry might have been Sephardic. An indicator
of Sephardic roots could be an oral Sephardic history, an Iberian
sounding name, a Sephardic naming custom, or a Mediterranean genetic
disorder. Many of the project members have found Y-DNA evidence that
their paternal lines were, indeed, Sephardic. The project has grown
to 89 members now, including the Sephardic or converso Y-DNA matches
of the Ashkenazi members.

At this time, we are only looking at paternal lines because we are
able to estimate the time when the common Sephardic ancestor lived
using Y-DNA, which only males carry. It is passed down each
generation >from father to son. We may in the future be able to trace
maternal ancestry back using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) which gets
passed >from one generation to the next by the mother only; we would
need to test the entire mtDNA sequence (FGS), which at this time is an
expense that many people do not wish to incur. When the price of the
FGS comes down, then we will include mtDNA testing in the project too
and anyone (male or female) who believes their maternal line was
Sephardic would be able to join the project. If I hear >from enough
people wanting to test their maternal line for Sephardic ancestry and
are willing to order the FGS, I will start an Iberian Ashkenaz mtDNA
project now.

For anyone who is interested in the Iberian Ashkenaz Y-DNA project,
the website is:
https://www.familytreedna.com/public/IberianSurnamesofAshkenaz

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY

researching: BROSGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MARANSK, BAILENSON, SKUTESLKY from
Rezekne, Latvia; LEFKOWITZ, MEZELSOR >from Skierniewice, Poland;
KELMER, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA >from Zychlin, Poland

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The DNA list has been set up for discussions about
the uses of DNA testing in genealogy. The DNA page can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/
Any further discussion of this topic should take place privately or on that list.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Questions about Crypto-Jews #general

Judy Simon
 

Ava Cohn wrote:
I also agree with Tom that DNA testing might add some clues. But, again, not
completely definitive.
Ava Cohn
Long Grove, IL
Searching: SHENKMAN/FRIEDMAN/SELIGMAN: Vitebsk gubernia, Bel>Riga
COHN/ABRAMOWITZ: Botosani, Bucharesti>Montreal>Israel;
HANDELMAN/GANDELMAN/STERN/FISCHMANN Shpikow, Bratslav, Ukr.
HAMMER Krasne Ilske, Ukr.; Czernovitsi>Montreal
ABRAMS/ABROMOWITZ Odessa>Paterson, NJ
Ava, I notice you are researching several families >from Vitebsk
gubernia and also have an interest in researching Sephardic history in
Spain. Do you have any indications that any of the families you are
researching >from Vitebsk gubernia might have had Sephardic ancestry?

The reason I ask is that my maternal grandfather >from Rezekne (in
Vitebsk gubernia) and another family I have been in contact with with
recent ancestry >from Daugavpils (also in Vitebsk gub) have oral
histories that their paternal ancestors were >from Spain. We were
wondering if there could have been a small community of Sephardic
descendants who settled in Vitebsk gubernia. Eventually, they were
absorbed into the Ashkenazi culture, and retained little or none of
their Sephardic customs.

A few years ago I started a Y-DNA project at Family Tree DNA with
Schelly Talalay Dardashti for Ashkenazi Jews who have some indication
that their paternal ancestry might have been Sephardic. An indicator
of Sephardic roots could be an oral Sephardic history, an Iberian
sounding name, a Sephardic naming custom, or a Mediterranean genetic
disorder. Many of the project members have found Y-DNA evidence that
their paternal lines were, indeed, Sephardic. The project has grown
to 89 members now, including the Sephardic or converso Y-DNA matches
of the Ashkenazi members.

At this time, we are only looking at paternal lines because we are
able to estimate the time when the common Sephardic ancestor lived
using Y-DNA, which only males carry. It is passed down each
generation >from father to son. We may in the future be able to trace
maternal ancestry back using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) which gets
passed >from one generation to the next by the mother only; we would
need to test the entire mtDNA sequence (FGS), which at this time is an
expense that many people do not wish to incur. When the price of the
FGS comes down, then we will include mtDNA testing in the project too
and anyone (male or female) who believes their maternal line was
Sephardic would be able to join the project. If I hear >from enough
people wanting to test their maternal line for Sephardic ancestry and
are willing to order the FGS, I will start an Iberian Ashkenaz mtDNA
project now.

For anyone who is interested in the Iberian Ashkenaz Y-DNA project,
the website is:
https://www.familytreedna.com/public/IberianSurnamesofAshkenaz

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY

researching: BROSGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MARANSK, BAILENSON, SKUTESLKY from
Rezekne, Latvia; LEFKOWITZ, MEZELSOR >from Skierniewice, Poland;
KELMER, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA >from Zychlin, Poland

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The DNA list has been set up for discussions about
the uses of DNA testing in genealogy. The DNA page can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/
Any further discussion of this topic should take place privately or on that list.