Date   

Have you recently used the Belarus State Archives? #belarus

mokotoff@...
 

Has anyone had recent (past six months) experience -- onsite or by mail --
dealing with the Belarus State Archives? Please respond privately.

Gary Mokotoff


Belarus SIG #Belarus Have you recently used the Belarus State Archives? #belarus

mokotoff@...
 

Has anyone had recent (past six months) experience -- onsite or by mail --
dealing with the Belarus State Archives? Please respond privately.

Gary Mokotoff


Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #sephardic

Jeff at SG
 

Schelly Dardashti, founder of Tracing the Tribe

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the Award of
Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources. Dardashti, a native New
Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her article Ties That
Bind: Jewish Research Strategies published in the September 2009 issue
of Family Tree Magazine.

Schelly, a native New Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her
article "Ties That Bind: Jewish Research Strategies" published in the
September 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

We all know Schelly as a tireless Jewish researcher, journalist, blogger
(Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog and MyHeritage Genealogy
Blog), online instructor, and international speaker. She was the
Jerusalem Post genealogy columnist (“It’s All Relative,” 1995-2005),
taught online Jewish genealogy at MyFamily.com, and is co-founder of
GenClass.com. Also a former three-term president of the Jewish Family
Research Association Israel.

Bravo Schelly for this well deserved distinction. The National
Genealogical Society is the most prestigious genealogical society
in the US.

Jeff Malka


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Schelly Dardashti wins prestigious NGS award #sephardic

Jeff at SG
 

Schelly Dardashti, founder of Tracing the Tribe

Schelly Talalay Dardashti was recognized by the National Genealogical
Society at its 2010 conference in Salt Lake City with the Award of
Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources. Dardashti, a native New
Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her article Ties That
Bind: Jewish Research Strategies published in the September 2009 issue
of Family Tree Magazine.

Schelly, a native New Yorker now based in Tel Aviv, was honored for her
article "Ties That Bind: Jewish Research Strategies" published in the
September 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

We all know Schelly as a tireless Jewish researcher, journalist, blogger
(Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog and MyHeritage Genealogy
Blog), online instructor, and international speaker. She was the
Jerusalem Post genealogy columnist (“It’s All Relative,” 1995-2005),
taught online Jewish genealogy at MyFamily.com, and is co-founder of
GenClass.com. Also a former three-term president of the Jewish Family
Research Association Israel.

Bravo Schelly for this well deserved distinction. The National
Genealogical Society is the most prestigious genealogical society
in the US.

Jeff Malka


WEXLER>WECHSLER #rabbinic

rachel duke <rachelree78@...>
 

searching Rabbi WEXLER b about 1865-75 Zhitomor, Ukr.

rachel duke


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic WEXLER>WECHSLER #rabbinic

rachel duke <rachelree78@...>
 

searching Rabbi WEXLER b about 1865-75 Zhitomor, Ukr.

rachel duke


Liberation of Lwow/Lviv - July 1944 - assistance with Russian translation #galicia

Josef Herz <josef@...>
 

Shalom -

I received a newspaper that was apparently published shortly
after Lwow/Lviv was liberated in July 1944. The newsletter was
given to me by the daughter of Tema Ehrlich. Tema Ehrlich (z"l)
was born in Lwow and survived destruction of the Jewish
population of Lwow by hiding.

Both my parent, Shmuel Herz (z"l) and Shoshana Sigal (z"l), were
also >from Lwow and survived the war by fighting in the Polish
and Russian armies. Both their families living in Lwow and its
vicinity perished during the Shoa.

The four page newspaper is now on Viewmate - assistance in
translating the Russian to see if it has relevant genealogy
information would be greatly appreciated.

<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15287>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15288>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15289>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15290>

Please feel free to respond to the group list - since the
information found in the newspaper maybe of general interest.

Thank you in advance.

Josef

Josef A. Herz
Researching:
HERZ, BERGNER, SCHNAPPER, SIGAL, SCHUMER, LEIBER
From: Lvov/Lwow/Lemberg,Kristinopol/Chervonograd,
Stoyanov/Stiyanev, Sokal

MODERATOR NOTE: Brief translations/summaries of general
interest will be considered for posting. Longer translations may
be viewed on ViewMate.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Liberation of Lwow/Lviv - July 1944 - assistance with Russian translation #galicia

Josef Herz <josef@...>
 

Shalom -

I received a newspaper that was apparently published shortly
after Lwow/Lviv was liberated in July 1944. The newsletter was
given to me by the daughter of Tema Ehrlich. Tema Ehrlich (z"l)
was born in Lwow and survived destruction of the Jewish
population of Lwow by hiding.

Both my parent, Shmuel Herz (z"l) and Shoshana Sigal (z"l), were
also >from Lwow and survived the war by fighting in the Polish
and Russian armies. Both their families living in Lwow and its
vicinity perished during the Shoa.

The four page newspaper is now on Viewmate - assistance in
translating the Russian to see if it has relevant genealogy
information would be greatly appreciated.

<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15287>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15288>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15289>
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15290>

Please feel free to respond to the group list - since the
information found in the newspaper maybe of general interest.

Thank you in advance.

Josef

Josef A. Herz
Researching:
HERZ, BERGNER, SCHNAPPER, SIGAL, SCHUMER, LEIBER
From: Lvov/Lwow/Lemberg,Kristinopol/Chervonograd,
Stoyanov/Stiyanev, Sokal

MODERATOR NOTE: Brief translations/summaries of general
interest will be considered for posting. Longer translations may
be viewed on ViewMate.


Seeking my Australian Cousins #ukraine

rosef@...
 

If they were in Eretz Israel during World War I, they may have been
expelled by the Turks. Below is a link to a partial list of those who
were expelled to Alexandria. A number of those in the list have
Australia as their destination. Try searching by the various names in
your family way back when.
Maybe you will be lucky and find a trace of them.

http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4973.asp

Rose Feldman
IGS Webmistress


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Seeking my Australian Cousins #ukraine

rosef@...
 

If they were in Eretz Israel during World War I, they may have been
expelled by the Turks. Below is a link to a partial list of those who
were expelled to Alexandria. A number of those in the list have
Australia as their destination. Try searching by the various names in
your family way back when.
Maybe you will be lucky and find a trace of them.

http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4973.asp

Rose Feldman
IGS Webmistress


Mormon FHL microfilms of Slovak records #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

I have been following the progress of the Mormons' Family History
Library (FHL) in making available microfilms of Jewish records >from
Slovakia. Mostly I had been doing periodic searches of their online
catalog for the keywords Slovakia and Jewish. However, I found out I
have been missing some of the newer (temporary) entries.

All of the records >from the Bratislava REGIONAL Archives should be
available. Some of the records >from places with names late in the
alphabet, which have been filmed most recently, may not show up in a
keyword search. I have been able to find with a PLACE search. Some
places this applies to are Trstin, Vbovce, and Vrbove.

The catalog can be searched at
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp


I have also heard that the records >from the Bratislava Regional Archives
should be available online later this year (similar to the records >from
the Presov Regional Archive).

Unfortunately they are not filming at the Bratislava MUNICIPAL Archive,
where records >from the city of Bratislava are kept, due to lack of funding.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Mormon FHL microfilms of Slovak records #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

I have been following the progress of the Mormons' Family History
Library (FHL) in making available microfilms of Jewish records >from
Slovakia. Mostly I had been doing periodic searches of their online
catalog for the keywords Slovakia and Jewish. However, I found out I
have been missing some of the newer (temporary) entries.

All of the records >from the Bratislava REGIONAL Archives should be
available. Some of the records >from places with names late in the
alphabet, which have been filmed most recently, may not show up in a
keyword search. I have been able to find with a PLACE search. Some
places this applies to are Trstin, Vbovce, and Vrbove.

The catalog can be searched at
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp


I have also heard that the records >from the Bratislava Regional Archives
should be available online later this year (similar to the records >from
the Presov Regional Archive).

Unfortunately they are not filming at the Bratislava MUNICIPAL Archive,
where records >from the city of Bratislava are kept, due to lack of funding.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA


Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

Judy Petersen
 

In a message dated 5/10/2010 11:56:20 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
loisl637@comcast.net writes:
So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick

Hi Lois,
The short answer is yes. Here are two examples >from my own family:

1) My LICHT family is >from Kormend, Hungary. While on one hand, various
branches of my family were in Kormend >from the late 1700s until the
Holocaust, in my immediate family, of 6 siblings, two went to America, one went to
Papa, Hungary, one went to Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia) one went to Vienna
and one stayed in Körmend.

2) It also depends on their occupation. For example, my STOSZEL family
were cantors. It was a very mobile profession. For my great great
grandfather, I have yet to find two of his children born in the same town, and those
children settled in at least three different towns. For my great
grandfather, it's complicated by the fact that he was married and divorced, so I'm
researching both my direct line and the half siblings. So far I have
found this family all over the Austria-Hungarian empire: in Hungary they lived
in Csecse, Eger, Hodmezovasarhely, Vacz, Ujpest and Pest. In Slovakia I've
found them in several towns in Nyitra megye. My great-grandfather also
spent some time in Uzhorod, which is now in Ukraine. And a granddaughter
ended up in Berlin.

Whenever I come across people who have the same name I add them to my
files with a question mark until I can prove a relationship one way or the
other. Most times I've been able to find a connection. Of course, it
depends on how common a surname you're researching. LICHT and STOSZEL are not
super common names. For me, there's a fair chance that a person with that
surname is related. I also have the WEISS surname in my family. In that
case, most people with that surname, or even the exact name (like Jacob
WEISS) are not related.
Regards,

Judy Petersen
Fort Collins, CO


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

Judy Petersen
 

In a message dated 5/10/2010 11:56:20 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
loisl637@comcast.net writes:
So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick

Hi Lois,
The short answer is yes. Here are two examples >from my own family:

1) My LICHT family is >from Kormend, Hungary. While on one hand, various
branches of my family were in Kormend >from the late 1700s until the
Holocaust, in my immediate family, of 6 siblings, two went to America, one went to
Papa, Hungary, one went to Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia) one went to Vienna
and one stayed in Körmend.

2) It also depends on their occupation. For example, my STOSZEL family
were cantors. It was a very mobile profession. For my great great
grandfather, I have yet to find two of his children born in the same town, and those
children settled in at least three different towns. For my great
grandfather, it's complicated by the fact that he was married and divorced, so I'm
researching both my direct line and the half siblings. So far I have
found this family all over the Austria-Hungarian empire: in Hungary they lived
in Csecse, Eger, Hodmezovasarhely, Vacz, Ujpest and Pest. In Slovakia I've
found them in several towns in Nyitra megye. My great-grandfather also
spent some time in Uzhorod, which is now in Ukraine. And a granddaughter
ended up in Berlin.

Whenever I come across people who have the same name I add them to my
files with a question mark until I can prove a relationship one way or the
other. Most times I've been able to find a connection. Of course, it
depends on how common a surname you're researching. LICHT and STOSZEL are not
super common names. For me, there's a fair chance that a person with that
surname is related. I also have the WEISS surname in my family. In that
case, most people with that surname, or even the exact name (like Jacob
WEISS) are not related.
Regards,

Judy Petersen
Fort Collins, CO


Chaimovic and Strobel Families #hungary

frishmechlis@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I am researching my Chaimovic family >from Kolocava in Subcarpathia (once the
Austro-Hungerian Empire, later Czechoslovakia, later USSR and now Ukraina)
and the Strobel family >from Subcarpathia (which was also called Ruthenia).

Thanks in advance,

Karl Frish
Hod-Hasharon
Israel

also researching: Frisch family in Balassagyarmat, Nograd county Hungary and
Bratislava in todays Slovakia and Kaufer family in Galanta, Sered and
Bratislava in Slovakia.


Re: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

tom.vene@...
 

Hello Louis:
I can only speak about what happened in my family. In my family the answer
to your question would be a sound YES. My ancestors not only moved to and
fro different counties, but they also changed residences to distant towns
and villages 150-200 miles apart >from their original abode. This is how I
have in my family two major branches, one that settled to where today is
Slovakia and another that moved to today's Hungary.
Good luck with your search

Tom Venetianer
Sao Paulo-Brazil
email: tom.vene@bol.com.br

-----Original Message-----

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Lois Levick


Hungary SIG #Hungary Chaimovic and Strobel Families #hungary

frishmechlis@...
 

Dear Siggers,
I am researching my Chaimovic family >from Kolocava in Subcarpathia (once the
Austro-Hungerian Empire, later Czechoslovakia, later USSR and now Ukraina)
and the Strobel family >from Subcarpathia (which was also called Ruthenia).

Thanks in advance,

Karl Frish
Hod-Hasharon
Israel

also researching: Frisch family in Balassagyarmat, Nograd county Hungary and
Bratislava in todays Slovakia and Kaufer family in Galanta, Sered and
Bratislava in Slovakia.


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary

tom.vene@...
 

Hello Louis:
I can only speak about what happened in my family. In my family the answer
to your question would be a sound YES. My ancestors not only moved to and
fro different counties, but they also changed residences to distant towns
and villages 150-200 miles apart >from their original abode. This is how I
have in my family two major branches, one that settled to where today is
Slovakia and another that moved to today's Hungary.
Good luck with your search

Tom Venetianer
Sao Paulo-Brazil
email: tom.vene@bol.com.br

-----Original Message-----

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Lois Levick


Re: Migration #hungary

pgbakos@...
 

The interesting question of movment between the various counties (megye) of Hungary has been raised.
I can only discuss the revelations of my own family research.
In the case of my Podwinec ancestors, 4 brothers arrived in Hungary >from Bohemia in the period prior to the 1848 Revolution. They settled in three places. Their numerous offspring typically left one male child in the home town and the rest seemed to migrate. So in the period 1860-1900 about two dozen persons (not counting those who went to the US) went to 12 or more different places plus Budapest and one to Vienna. Some had specialized skills, others were simply traders.
In my Rosenberg ancestry movement was a real situation with four successive generations living in four different towns or cities, plus emigration to the US and to Budapest.
The family of my father were Catholics >from western Hungary. My Great grandfather bought land near the county seat and moved most of his family there. His eldest son (my grandfather) went to south Hungary. His grandchildren lived in five or six places.
My friends whose genealogy I have done and who are not Jewish, reflect this sort of mobility as well. The family did not go to Budapest but the did go to towns where there were more opportunities.
Having said all that, I do have one friend whose family has been farming in the same area >from time immemorial.

I think in is hard to make hard and fast rules about migration, but in all of my historical work (including in France) populations were more fluid that we might otherwise think.

Peter Bakos
St-Crespin, France


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:Migration #hungary

pgbakos@...
 

The interesting question of movment between the various counties (megye) of Hungary has been raised.
I can only discuss the revelations of my own family research.
In the case of my Podwinec ancestors, 4 brothers arrived in Hungary >from Bohemia in the period prior to the 1848 Revolution. They settled in three places. Their numerous offspring typically left one male child in the home town and the rest seemed to migrate. So in the period 1860-1900 about two dozen persons (not counting those who went to the US) went to 12 or more different places plus Budapest and one to Vienna. Some had specialized skills, others were simply traders.
In my Rosenberg ancestry movement was a real situation with four successive generations living in four different towns or cities, plus emigration to the US and to Budapest.
The family of my father were Catholics >from western Hungary. My Great grandfather bought land near the county seat and moved most of his family there. His eldest son (my grandfather) went to south Hungary. His grandchildren lived in five or six places.
My friends whose genealogy I have done and who are not Jewish, reflect this sort of mobility as well. The family did not go to Budapest but the did go to towns where there were more opportunities.
Having said all that, I do have one friend whose family has been farming in the same area >from time immemorial.

I think in is hard to make hard and fast rules about migration, but in all of my historical work (including in France) populations were more fluid that we might otherwise think.

Peter Bakos
St-Crespin, France