Date   

Re: Records from Lodz #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Ariel,

Although I don't know which is which, I believe these are the Unikat and
Duplikat Registers, one in the USC and the other in the Lodz Archives.
In that case, they are likely to be almost the same although we do find
differences >from time to time.

The problem is that the Lodz Archives does not typically allow a search
of the post 1911 data and refers people to the USC. At least that is
what a Lodz researcher in Poland told me, as well as others who are
researching records less than 100 years old. This is consistent with
the Polish state privacy law that only records more than 100 years old
can be made available to the public.

However the Lodz Archives have Books of Residents that can be searched and
they may indicate the information on the birth as well as the actual place
of birth of the mother and thus the likely place for the marriage.
JRI-Poland had just started indexing that when all indexing was stopped a
few years ago.

You may want to consider hiring a researcher in Lodz to search the Book of
Residents for your family information. If you need names of researchers
there, let me know.

What names are you researching? Perhaps someone else reading this will have
more information for you.

Good luck with your research.

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York
Lodz Archive Coordinator for JRI-Poland


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Records from Lodz #poland #lodz

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Ariel,

Although I don't know which is which, I believe these are the Unikat and
Duplikat Registers, one in the USC and the other in the Lodz Archives.
In that case, they are likely to be almost the same although we do find
differences >from time to time.

The problem is that the Lodz Archives does not typically allow a search
of the post 1911 data and refers people to the USC. At least that is
what a Lodz researcher in Poland told me, as well as others who are
researching records less than 100 years old. This is consistent with
the Polish state privacy law that only records more than 100 years old
can be made available to the public.

However the Lodz Archives have Books of Residents that can be searched and
they may indicate the information on the birth as well as the actual place
of birth of the mother and thus the likely place for the marriage.
JRI-Poland had just started indexing that when all indexing was stopped a
few years ago.

You may want to consider hiring a researcher in Lodz to search the Book of
Residents for your family information. If you need names of researchers
there, let me know.

What names are you researching? Perhaps someone else reading this will have
more information for you.

Good luck with your research.

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York
Lodz Archive Coordinator for JRI-Poland


Records from Lodz #lodz #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

We are searching for a birth registration >from the city of Lodz dates
back to 1938 (and a marriage registration dates back a few years
before)
We have addressed the USC but they DO NOT have any information
concerning both events

now after some search we found out that the Lodz archive contain ALSO
registration of birth and marriages >from these years

our question is: Is there a possibility that a marriage/birth record
from the 1930's that was not found in the USC-Lodz might be found in
the Lodz archive ?

Thank you
Ariel Koby


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Records from Lodz #lodz #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

We are searching for a birth registration >from the city of Lodz dates
back to 1938 (and a marriage registration dates back a few years
before)
We have addressed the USC but they DO NOT have any information
concerning both events

now after some search we found out that the Lodz archive contain ALSO
registration of birth and marriages >from these years

our question is: Is there a possibility that a marriage/birth record
from the 1930's that was not found in the USC-Lodz might be found in
the Lodz archive ?

Thank you
Ariel Koby


Re: Records from Lodz #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Ariel,

Although I don't know which is which, I believe these are the Unikat and
Duplikat Registers, one in the USC and the other in the Lodz Archives.
In that case, they are likely to be almost the same although we do find
differences >from time to time.

The problem is that the Lodz Archives does not typically allow a search
of the post 1911 data and refers people to the USC. At least that is what
a Lodz researcher in Poland told me, as well as others who are researching
records less than 100 years old. This is consistent with the Polish state
privacy law that only records more than 100 years old can be made available
to the public.

However the Lodz Archives have Books of Residents that can be searched
and they may indicate the information on the birth as well as the actual
place of birth of the mother and thus the likely place for the marriage.
JRI-Poland had just started indexing that when all indexing was stopped
a few years ago.

You may want to consider hiring a researcher in Lodz to search the Book of
Residents for your family information. If you need names of researchers there,
let me know.

What names are you researching? Perhaps someone else reading this will have
more information for you.

Good luck with your research.

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York
Lodz Archive Coordinator for JRI-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Records from Lodz #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Ariel,

Although I don't know which is which, I believe these are the Unikat and
Duplikat Registers, one in the USC and the other in the Lodz Archives.
In that case, they are likely to be almost the same although we do find
differences >from time to time.

The problem is that the Lodz Archives does not typically allow a search
of the post 1911 data and refers people to the USC. At least that is what
a Lodz researcher in Poland told me, as well as others who are researching
records less than 100 years old. This is consistent with the Polish state
privacy law that only records more than 100 years old can be made available
to the public.

However the Lodz Archives have Books of Residents that can be searched
and they may indicate the information on the birth as well as the actual
place of birth of the mother and thus the likely place for the marriage.
JRI-Poland had just started indexing that when all indexing was stopped
a few years ago.

You may want to consider hiring a researcher in Lodz to search the Book of
Residents for your family information. If you need names of researchers there,
let me know.

What names are you researching? Perhaps someone else reading this will have
more information for you.

Good luck with your research.

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York
Lodz Archive Coordinator for JRI-Poland


Records from Lodz #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

We are searching for a birth registration >from the city of Lodz dates
back to 1938 (and a marriage registration dates back a few years
before)
We have addressed the USC but they DO NOT have any information
concerning both events

now after some search we found out that the Lodz archive contain ALSO
registration of birth and marriages >from these years

our question is: Is there a possibility that a marriage/birth record
from the 1930's that was not found in the USC-Lodz might be found in
the Lodz archive ?

Thank you
Ariel Koby


JRI Poland #Poland Records from Lodz #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

We are searching for a birth registration >from the city of Lodz dates
back to 1938 (and a marriage registration dates back a few years
before)
We have addressed the USC but they DO NOT have any information
concerning both events

now after some search we found out that the Lodz archive contain ALSO
registration of birth and marriages >from these years

our question is: Is there a possibility that a marriage/birth record
from the 1930's that was not found in the USC-Lodz might be found in
the Lodz archive ?

Thank you
Ariel Koby


Request translation ViewMate - Hungarian #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I've been given 2 birth records, probably >from Celdomolk, for my g'aunt and g'uncle. However, I don't speak
Hungarian, and I'd appreciate a direct translation. Each record is 2 lines long. It looks like it took 2 images to
copy each record. I'm interested only in the records for Beno Goldmann and Ilona Goldmann. The records are
at ViewMate #25776 - 25779.  Most grateful for your assistance!

Diane Jacobs
Austin Texas

Moderator: Please use ViewMate form to respond.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Request translation ViewMate - Hungarian #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I've been given 2 birth records, probably >from Celdomolk, for my g'aunt and g'uncle. However, I don't speak
Hungarian, and I'd appreciate a direct translation. Each record is 2 lines long. It looks like it took 2 images to
copy each record. I'm interested only in the records for Beno Goldmann and Ilona Goldmann. The records are
at ViewMate #25776 - 25779.  Most grateful for your assistance!

Diane Jacobs
Austin Texas

Moderator: Please use ViewMate form to respond.


Question on a theory on the origin of the surname Meixler #hungary

lmeixler@...
 

Dear Hungary SIG,

I asked Dr. Nathan Reiss [Rutgers University], for his thoughts about the origin of Meixler as a Jewish
surname.

Attached is a synopsis of his thoughts. I was wondering if anyone on the Hungary SIG had any comments.
Below is a record of a correspondence between Dr. Nathan Reiss and myself on the possible origin of the
surname Meixler.

Lew Meixler


Dear Dr. Reiss,

If you have any thoughts about my last name, I would appreciate what you think. I have researched it back
to the early 1800s in Hungary, and the spelling was always Meixler, Maixler, so some variant on that.

Dear Lew,
As for your name, I don't know, but ever since I first saw it I've been curious about its origins. I had been
guessing that itwas old Spanish. I just checked my little book of Jewish names and theclosest name that it
has is Meisel, which it suggests is a patronymicname, "an affectionate diminutive of Mordechai".or from
"Moshe". If I had to guess, I'd suggest the latter, and that it came>from a place where the letter "x" was
pronounced as "sh".How does your family pronounce the name?

Sincerely,
Nathan


Dear Nathan,

Thanks for the thoughts on my name. You are the second person who mentioned old spanish.
It was always pronounced Mike-slur as far as Iknow. The family came >from a town in Hungary - Miskolc. I was able to trace it back to about 1807 there.

Lew


Lew,

I'll bet the place name Miskolc(s?) is theanswer. I once had a summer job in a place where everyone else but mespoke Hungarian, so I learned a bit about the language. Although neither the"c" or "cs" sounds are pronounced like an English"x", it's plausible that the last part of the town's name wasmispronounced as a "ks" by non-Hungarians. So a person >from Miskolcswould be a Miskolcser, which would be pronounced as "Miskolxer",which would explain how the "x" got in there. Then it probably wassimplified to its current form. This could well have happened while your familywas still in Hungary, because it was under foreign rule for so much of itshistory.

Nathan,

Dear Hungary SIG
This is a really interesting theory. Do you think it is correct?
Lew Meixler


JOWBR Update Announcement #hungary

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2012 year-end update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're
a new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 94,000 new records and 40,000 new photos.
The database is adding 216 new cemeteries along with updates or additions to
an additional 129 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's holdings to 1.95
million records >from more than 3,800 cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 81
countries! (Cemetery Description files, maps and overview photos are being
processed and should be completed by the end of the month.)

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many data sets >from around the world. In
addition, without our volunteer transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we
would not be able to add the information >from some very difficult to read
photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
-- Hamburg, Germany. Thanks to Herr Gerold Helmts of the Jüdische
Gemeinde Hamburg (www.jfhh.org) for more than 14,500 records >from the
Hamburg cemetery. More records will be added to this collection in the
future.
-- Berlin, Germany. Thanks to Bert de Jong who has been working on
photographing and indexing the stones at the Weissensee Cemetery in Berlin.
This update includes 7,200 records and photos. Bert also submitted records
for other smaller German and Dutch cemeteries.
-- Brody, Ukraine. Thanks to Ami Elyasaf, Project Leader, Pam
Weisberger, Gesher Galicia Project Coordinator, and their team of volunteers
for submitting 6,200 photos and records >from Brody's new cemetery. An
entire list of volunteers can be found >from the Cemetery Description field
within JOWBR.
-- Miskolc, Hungary. Thanks to John Kovacs, Project Leader, and his
team of volunteer data entry and translators for submitting 6,100 records
from the Miskolc Chevra Kadisha register. An entire list of volunteers can
be found >from the Cemetery Description field within JOWBR.
-- Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator for the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for
submitting and updating approximately 4,200 records >from various cemeteries
along with 850 photos. We also than Robert Lubinski and Kevin Hanit for
their help with Ontario cemeteries.
-- Magdeburg and Halle, Germany. Thanks to Max Privorozki head of the
Jewish community of Halle/Salle who submitted approximately 3,800 records
from 3 cemeteries in the towns of Halle and Magdeburg.
-- Thessaloniki, Greece and Jamaica. Thanks to Michael Glatzer of the
Ben Zvi Institute in Jerusalem, publishers of two volumes whose records are
in this update. Isaac Samuel Emmanuel's, book "Matzevot Saloniki adding
approximately 1,900 records >from Thessaloniki and Richard D. Barnett and
Philip Wright?s book (edited by Oron Yoffe), "The Jews of Jamaica,
Tombstone inscriptions 1663 - 1880" added more than 1,450 records >from 19
cemeteries throughout the island of Jamaica.
-- Leeds, England. We wish to thank the Leeds UHC, BHH and Eitz Chaim
Synagogues for permitting us to include approximately 3,000 records and
photos >from the Gelderd Road cemetery. An entire list of volunteers can be
found >from the Cemetery Description field within JOWBR.
-- Algeria. Thanks to Bernard Haddad for submitting approximately
2,800 records >from 4 Algerian cemeteries. Mr. Haddad is the president and
founder of Mémoire Active d'Algérie (Active Memory of Algeria,) the
association to safeguard and preserve Jewish cemeteries in Algeria.
-- Bender, Moldova. Thanks to Yefim Kogan, Cemetery Project
Coordinator for the Bessarabia SIG for submitting more than 2,600 records
and photos >from the Zagorodnaya Street cemetery.
-- Passaic Cemetery, New Jersey. Thanks to Mark Pollack for adding an
additional 2,400 records >from the Passaic Junction cemetery in Saddle Brook,
New Jersey.
-- Trebic, Czech Republic. Thanks to Lubor Herzan of the municipality
of Trebic and the Mayor of Trebic, Mr. Pavel Herman. More than 2,300
records were submitted >from information on headstones and >from the burial
register >from the town.
-- Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Thanks to Jakob Finci, President of
the Jewish Community of Sarajevo for access to more than 2,000 records from
the Sarajevo Cemetery.
-- King David Cemetery, Putnam, New York. Thanks to Gene Baumwoll CSW
for adding an additional 1,800 records and photos >from various sections of
the King David Cemetery (Beth David Cemetery) which is part of the Rose
Hills Memorial Park.
-- Mishawaka, Indiana. Thanks to Mike Kring for submitting 1,600
records and photos >from the Hebrew Orthodox Cemetery.
-- Harrisburg, PA. Thanks to Rabbi Akiva Males of Kesher Israel
Congregation in Harrisburg for submitting more than 1,500 records >from the
Kesher Israel Cemetery on 34th Street.
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

We plan on updating JewishGen's Memorial Plaque project before the summer
conference. We currently have approximately 10,000 records online with an
additional 10,000 to add. We're still actively looking for additional files
for the launch. Please contact me to find out more about this project and
how you or your JGS can help.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January, 2013


Hungary SIG #Hungary Question on a theory on the origin of the surname Meixler #hungary

lmeixler@...
 

Dear Hungary SIG,

I asked Dr. Nathan Reiss [Rutgers University], for his thoughts about the origin of Meixler as a Jewish
surname.

Attached is a synopsis of his thoughts. I was wondering if anyone on the Hungary SIG had any comments.
Below is a record of a correspondence between Dr. Nathan Reiss and myself on the possible origin of the
surname Meixler.

Lew Meixler


Dear Dr. Reiss,

If you have any thoughts about my last name, I would appreciate what you think. I have researched it back
to the early 1800s in Hungary, and the spelling was always Meixler, Maixler, so some variant on that.

Dear Lew,
As for your name, I don't know, but ever since I first saw it I've been curious about its origins. I had been
guessing that itwas old Spanish. I just checked my little book of Jewish names and theclosest name that it
has is Meisel, which it suggests is a patronymicname, "an affectionate diminutive of Mordechai".or from
"Moshe". If I had to guess, I'd suggest the latter, and that it came>from a place where the letter "x" was
pronounced as "sh".How does your family pronounce the name?

Sincerely,
Nathan


Dear Nathan,

Thanks for the thoughts on my name. You are the second person who mentioned old spanish.
It was always pronounced Mike-slur as far as Iknow. The family came >from a town in Hungary - Miskolc. I was able to trace it back to about 1807 there.

Lew


Lew,

I'll bet the place name Miskolc(s?) is theanswer. I once had a summer job in a place where everyone else but mespoke Hungarian, so I learned a bit about the language. Although neither the"c" or "cs" sounds are pronounced like an English"x", it's plausible that the last part of the town's name wasmispronounced as a "ks" by non-Hungarians. So a person >from Miskolcswould be a Miskolcser, which would be pronounced as "Miskolxer",which would explain how the "x" got in there. Then it probably wassimplified to its current form. This could well have happened while your familywas still in Hungary, because it was under foreign rule for so much of itshistory.

Nathan,

Dear Hungary SIG
This is a really interesting theory. Do you think it is correct?
Lew Meixler


Hungary SIG #Hungary JOWBR Update Announcement #hungary

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2012 year-end update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're
a new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 94,000 new records and 40,000 new photos.
The database is adding 216 new cemeteries along with updates or additions to
an additional 129 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's holdings to 1.95
million records >from more than 3,800 cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 81
countries! (Cemetery Description files, maps and overview photos are being
processed and should be completed by the end of the month.)

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many data sets >from around the world. In
addition, without our volunteer transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we
would not be able to add the information >from some very difficult to read
photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
-- Hamburg, Germany. Thanks to Herr Gerold Helmts of the Jüdische
Gemeinde Hamburg (www.jfhh.org) for more than 14,500 records >from the
Hamburg cemetery. More records will be added to this collection in the
future.
-- Berlin, Germany. Thanks to Bert de Jong who has been working on
photographing and indexing the stones at the Weissensee Cemetery in Berlin.
This update includes 7,200 records and photos. Bert also submitted records
for other smaller German and Dutch cemeteries.
-- Brody, Ukraine. Thanks to Ami Elyasaf, Project Leader, Pam
Weisberger, Gesher Galicia Project Coordinator, and their team of volunteers
for submitting 6,200 photos and records >from Brody's new cemetery. An
entire list of volunteers can be found >from the Cemetery Description field
within JOWBR.
-- Miskolc, Hungary. Thanks to John Kovacs, Project Leader, and his
team of volunteer data entry and translators for submitting 6,100 records
from the Miskolc Chevra Kadisha register. An entire list of volunteers can
be found >from the Cemetery Description field within JOWBR.
-- Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator for the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for
submitting and updating approximately 4,200 records >from various cemeteries
along with 850 photos. We also than Robert Lubinski and Kevin Hanit for
their help with Ontario cemeteries.
-- Magdeburg and Halle, Germany. Thanks to Max Privorozki head of the
Jewish community of Halle/Salle who submitted approximately 3,800 records
from 3 cemeteries in the towns of Halle and Magdeburg.
-- Thessaloniki, Greece and Jamaica. Thanks to Michael Glatzer of the
Ben Zvi Institute in Jerusalem, publishers of two volumes whose records are
in this update. Isaac Samuel Emmanuel's, book "Matzevot Saloniki adding
approximately 1,900 records >from Thessaloniki and Richard D. Barnett and
Philip Wright?s book (edited by Oron Yoffe), "The Jews of Jamaica,
Tombstone inscriptions 1663 - 1880" added more than 1,450 records >from 19
cemeteries throughout the island of Jamaica.
-- Leeds, England. We wish to thank the Leeds UHC, BHH and Eitz Chaim
Synagogues for permitting us to include approximately 3,000 records and
photos >from the Gelderd Road cemetery. An entire list of volunteers can be
found >from the Cemetery Description field within JOWBR.
-- Algeria. Thanks to Bernard Haddad for submitting approximately
2,800 records >from 4 Algerian cemeteries. Mr. Haddad is the president and
founder of Mémoire Active d'Algérie (Active Memory of Algeria,) the
association to safeguard and preserve Jewish cemeteries in Algeria.
-- Bender, Moldova. Thanks to Yefim Kogan, Cemetery Project
Coordinator for the Bessarabia SIG for submitting more than 2,600 records
and photos >from the Zagorodnaya Street cemetery.
-- Passaic Cemetery, New Jersey. Thanks to Mark Pollack for adding an
additional 2,400 records >from the Passaic Junction cemetery in Saddle Brook,
New Jersey.
-- Trebic, Czech Republic. Thanks to Lubor Herzan of the municipality
of Trebic and the Mayor of Trebic, Mr. Pavel Herman. More than 2,300
records were submitted >from information on headstones and >from the burial
register >from the town.
-- Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Thanks to Jakob Finci, President of
the Jewish Community of Sarajevo for access to more than 2,000 records from
the Sarajevo Cemetery.
-- King David Cemetery, Putnam, New York. Thanks to Gene Baumwoll CSW
for adding an additional 1,800 records and photos >from various sections of
the King David Cemetery (Beth David Cemetery) which is part of the Rose
Hills Memorial Park.
-- Mishawaka, Indiana. Thanks to Mike Kring for submitting 1,600
records and photos >from the Hebrew Orthodox Cemetery.
-- Harrisburg, PA. Thanks to Rabbi Akiva Males of Kesher Israel
Congregation in Harrisburg for submitting more than 1,500 records >from the
Kesher Israel Cemetery on 34th Street.
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

We plan on updating JewishGen's Memorial Plaque project before the summer
conference. We currently have approximately 10,000 records online with an
additional 10,000 to add. We're still actively looking for additional files
for the launch. Please contact me to find out more about this project and
how you or your JGS can help.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January, 2013


ViewMate Translation Request -Hungarian #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I've acquired copies of the birth listings for a great-aunt and great-uncle and would much appreciate
translation. I believe copying each record (very brief, 2 lines each) required 2 images - so there are 4 in all.  
They are at ViewMate, Nos. 25576, 25577, 25578, and 25579. The father is Samuel Goldmann and the children
are Beno and Ilona.

Thanks so much for your help!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas =

Moderator: Please use ViewMate form to respond.


Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate Translation Request -Hungarian #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I've acquired copies of the birth listings for a great-aunt and great-uncle and would much appreciate
translation. I believe copying each record (very brief, 2 lines each) required 2 images - so there are 4 in all.  
They are at ViewMate, Nos. 25576, 25577, 25578, and 25579. The father is Samuel Goldmann and the children
are Beno and Ilona.

Thanks so much for your help!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas =

Moderator: Please use ViewMate form to respond.


Records for Zemplen County #hungary

jonathan_david_il@...
 

Thanks to the moderator and to Pamela Weisberger, I was able to find a listing on the 1869 census that I
believe is my family.  It was listed as Veinberger, and I had been searching for Weinberger.  I knew my gggf
as Henry, but he was listed as Heinrich, and my gggm Kati was listed as Katalin  My great grandfather,
Emanauel, was listed as Mendely.  Perhaps he took the name Emanual when he emigrated to the USA.  An
older sister, Beti, was also listed, but no other siblings.  I know that there was a brother (but don't know his
name), so this brother must have been born after the census was taken.
 
The census listed the town in Zemplen county as Sokut.  I am assuming that this is also known as Szeged.
 
This census gave my gggm's birth year as 1842 (and her maiden name, Rozenberg), which would have made
her 102 in 1944,  This ties in to family legend that she was over 100 when killed in the Shoah.
 
I've searched the 1848 census, hoping to find my gggf Henry/Heinrich listed as a ten (+/-) year old boy,
but had no luck there.  I searchef for my gggm Kati/Katalin as a six year old Rozenberg, but didn't find
anything.  Also I've searched the Yad Vashem website for variations of Weinberger >from Zemplen/Szeged and
had no success.  So I'm wondering what other records are available for that area, such as LDS films, etc. 
When I was searching for relatives >from Fehergyarmat, the LDS had a film >from the rabbinate of bitrhs,
marriages and deaths, which was very helpful. 
 
Yonatan
Tel Aviv


Hungary SIG #Hungary Records for Zemplen County #hungary

jonathan_david_il@...
 

Thanks to the moderator and to Pamela Weisberger, I was able to find a listing on the 1869 census that I
believe is my family.  It was listed as Veinberger, and I had been searching for Weinberger.  I knew my gggf
as Henry, but he was listed as Heinrich, and my gggm Kati was listed as Katalin  My great grandfather,
Emanauel, was listed as Mendely.  Perhaps he took the name Emanual when he emigrated to the USA.  An
older sister, Beti, was also listed, but no other siblings.  I know that there was a brother (but don't know his
name), so this brother must have been born after the census was taken.
 
The census listed the town in Zemplen county as Sokut.  I am assuming that this is also known as Szeged.
 
This census gave my gggm's birth year as 1842 (and her maiden name, Rozenberg), which would have made
her 102 in 1944,  This ties in to family legend that she was over 100 when killed in the Shoah.
 
I've searched the 1848 census, hoping to find my gggf Henry/Heinrich listed as a ten (+/-) year old boy,
but had no luck there.  I searchef for my gggm Kati/Katalin as a six year old Rozenberg, but didn't find
anything.  Also I've searched the Yad Vashem website for variations of Weinberger >from Zemplen/Szeged and
had no success.  So I'm wondering what other records are available for that area, such as LDS films, etc. 
When I was searching for relatives >from Fehergyarmat, the LDS had a film >from the rabbinate of bitrhs,
marriages and deaths, which was very helpful. 
 
Yonatan
Tel Aviv


Winter 2012 issue of Geneal-J #hungary

georges.graner@...
 

The Winter issue of Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of France, Issue 112, has been published.

Pierre-Andre Meyer is a well-known specialist of the Jews of Lorraine,
but in this issue we discover another facet of his studies. Without
being familiar with the Judeo-Spanish world, Meyer is looking for the
‘Ottoman’ roots of his great-grandmother born in 1870 in Constantinople.
Using family as well as archival documents, published books and Internet
resources, he portrays his Sephardic branch. Meyer focuses on a few
strong individualities such as his great-great-grandfather Abraham Isaïe
Agiman, a member of the Ottoman Parliament and Camondo’s trusted agent.
Over the years, branches of the family spread to a multitude of
countries over the years and settled in Paris, Vienna, Trieste, England,
America and Israel. Meyer traces his family >from its “cradle in
Istanbul” to its complete dispersion.
In a paper entitled “Genealogical travels along the Tisza River,”
Georges Graner deals with his Gottdiener ancestors who lived in the
Tokaj region of Hungary near the Tisza River and its tributary the
Bodrog River. They were rabbis or wine merchants >from 1800 to World War
II. After establishing their genealogy, Graner questions the family
legends: Did the Gottdieners actually come >from Spain through Turkey and
is Gottdiener the translation of Obadia, a typical North-African surname
? Another explanation also is suggested. Since Gottdiener means servant
of God, they could just be Cohens. The author also fancies that they
were among those who created or improved the world famous Tokaj wine,
the king of wines, the wine of kings.
In 791, the founder of Morocco, Idriss I was murdered, probably at the
instigation of Caliph Harun-al-Rashid (of One Thousand and One Nights
fame). A legend transmitted among certain Chemama/Samama/Scemama
families >from Tunisia and now found on Wikipedia states that the
murderer was a Jew named Salomon Schemma, who might be an ancestor of
these families. Precise analysis of modern versions of the story,
coupled with recent academic work on the various narratives produced by
numerous Muslim historians, lead Thierry Scemama to a negative
conclusion regarding the likelihood of the legend.
Eliane Roos Schuhl, our specialist on Hebraic paleography, explains the
way dates are written on the tombstones and draws attention to a
frequent confusion between what is called in French the grand comput and
the petit comput. (The difference between writing the full date in
Herbrew letters versus omitting the letters for the thousands.) She
takes this opportunity to present the genealogy of a July Levy, born in
Bischheim, near Strasbourg.in 1849 and buried in Rouen in 1922.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Winter 2012 issue of Geneal-J #hungary

georges.graner@...
 

The Winter issue of Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of France, Issue 112, has been published.

Pierre-Andre Meyer is a well-known specialist of the Jews of Lorraine,
but in this issue we discover another facet of his studies. Without
being familiar with the Judeo-Spanish world, Meyer is looking for the
‘Ottoman’ roots of his great-grandmother born in 1870 in Constantinople.
Using family as well as archival documents, published books and Internet
resources, he portrays his Sephardic branch. Meyer focuses on a few
strong individualities such as his great-great-grandfather Abraham Isaïe
Agiman, a member of the Ottoman Parliament and Camondo’s trusted agent.
Over the years, branches of the family spread to a multitude of
countries over the years and settled in Paris, Vienna, Trieste, England,
America and Israel. Meyer traces his family >from its “cradle in
Istanbul” to its complete dispersion.
In a paper entitled “Genealogical travels along the Tisza River,”
Georges Graner deals with his Gottdiener ancestors who lived in the
Tokaj region of Hungary near the Tisza River and its tributary the
Bodrog River. They were rabbis or wine merchants >from 1800 to World War
II. After establishing their genealogy, Graner questions the family
legends: Did the Gottdieners actually come >from Spain through Turkey and
is Gottdiener the translation of Obadia, a typical North-African surname
? Another explanation also is suggested. Since Gottdiener means servant
of God, they could just be Cohens. The author also fancies that they
were among those who created or improved the world famous Tokaj wine,
the king of wines, the wine of kings.
In 791, the founder of Morocco, Idriss I was murdered, probably at the
instigation of Caliph Harun-al-Rashid (of One Thousand and One Nights
fame). A legend transmitted among certain Chemama/Samama/Scemama
families >from Tunisia and now found on Wikipedia states that the
murderer was a Jew named Salomon Schemma, who might be an ancestor of
these families. Precise analysis of modern versions of the story,
coupled with recent academic work on the various narratives produced by
numerous Muslim historians, lead Thierry Scemama to a negative
conclusion regarding the likelihood of the legend.
Eliane Roos Schuhl, our specialist on Hebraic paleography, explains the
way dates are written on the tombstones and draws attention to a
frequent confusion between what is called in French the grand comput and
the petit comput. (The difference between writing the full date in
Herbrew letters versus omitting the letters for the thousands.) She
takes this opportunity to present the genealogy of a July Levy, born in
Bischheim, near Strasbourg.in 1849 and buried in Rouen in 1922.

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