Date   

Re: Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely #hungary

anitacsoke@...
 

Dear Thomas,

Thank you for this feedback, I'm sorry for the inconveniences, I wasn't aware of this problem.
Here are the towns again:

Mezoband - Mezo''ba'nd in Maros
Bord in Maros

Szelkut - Sze'lku't - today called: Salcud in Maros
Bord and Szelkut belonged to Kis-Kukullo - Kis-Ku:ku:llo'' - today called: Tarnava Mica

Olah-Andrasfalva - Ola'h-Andra'sfalva in Hargita - today called: Szekelyandrasfalva or Sacel.

Anita Csoke, Hungary
________________________________
From: "ThomasKleintomk@ecologicaltech.com" <ThomasKleintomk@ecologicaltech.com>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:02 AM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely


sorry to be a grump - i would love to try and
help, but i can't decipher any of the place
names, because i don't know the geography well
enough to guess. the jewishgen mail server does
not handle accented characters, and they arrive
garbled, replaced with meaningless,
unintelligible symbols.

it's a recurring problem, but this time i can't
even begin to guess, so please remember to remove
accents before posting messages to the list. (if
necessary, such as to clarify meaning, accents
can be indicated by adding a punctuation mark
after the vowel, such as a' or u: or o", which is
clumsy, but it works.)


....... tom klein, toronto


Jozsef Kohn was born in Mezâ?°?bË?*nd (Mezoband),
Maros around 1845, his wife Lujza Braun was born
in Bord, Maros around 1853. They had 5 children
- we know details about 2 of them: Roza was born
in Bord in 1881, Geza was born in SzË?älkË?â? t
(Salcud), Maros in 1888. These towns belonged to
Kis-KË?ßkË?ßllâ?°? (Tarnava Mica) near
Marosvasarhely. [snip!]
Moderator: Your loyal moderator decoded to the extent possible but, as Tom suggests,
subscribers who want to receive useful responses need to make efforts to make
their messages as legible as possible. PLEASE do not send messages with accented
characters!


Sombor/Szombor Databases #hungary

Amit N
 

Hello,

I am trying to perform a family research, for now focusing on a family
branch originated in Sombor, Vojvodina (currently Serbia). I would
like to know if there are any Jewish records (vital records or
residents records) >from this town surviving today? Or perhaps general
records? My gg-grandfather was born and buried there, and it would be
very interesting to try and locate some more data about his family.

Thank you on advance
Amit Naor
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely #hungary

anitacsoke@...
 

Dear Thomas,

Thank you for this feedback, I'm sorry for the inconveniences, I wasn't aware of this problem.
Here are the towns again:

Mezoband - Mezo''ba'nd in Maros
Bord in Maros

Szelkut - Sze'lku't - today called: Salcud in Maros
Bord and Szelkut belonged to Kis-Kukullo - Kis-Ku:ku:llo'' - today called: Tarnava Mica

Olah-Andrasfalva - Ola'h-Andra'sfalva in Hargita - today called: Szekelyandrasfalva or Sacel.

Anita Csoke, Hungary
________________________________
From: "ThomasKleintomk@ecologicaltech.com" <ThomasKleintomk@ecologicaltech.com>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:02 AM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely


sorry to be a grump - i would love to try and
help, but i can't decipher any of the place
names, because i don't know the geography well
enough to guess. the jewishgen mail server does
not handle accented characters, and they arrive
garbled, replaced with meaningless,
unintelligible symbols.

it's a recurring problem, but this time i can't
even begin to guess, so please remember to remove
accents before posting messages to the list. (if
necessary, such as to clarify meaning, accents
can be indicated by adding a punctuation mark
after the vowel, such as a' or u: or o", which is
clumsy, but it works.)


....... tom klein, toronto


Jozsef Kohn was born in Mezâ?°?bË?*nd (Mezoband),
Maros around 1845, his wife Lujza Braun was born
in Bord, Maros around 1853. They had 5 children
- we know details about 2 of them: Roza was born
in Bord in 1881, Geza was born in SzË?älkË?â? t
(Salcud), Maros in 1888. These towns belonged to
Kis-KË?ßkË?ßllâ?°? (Tarnava Mica) near
Marosvasarhely. [snip!]
Moderator: Your loyal moderator decoded to the extent possible but, as Tom suggests,
subscribers who want to receive useful responses need to make efforts to make
their messages as legible as possible. PLEASE do not send messages with accented
characters!


Hungary SIG #Hungary Sombor/Szombor Databases #hungary

Amit N
 

Hello,

I am trying to perform a family research, for now focusing on a family
branch originated in Sombor, Vojvodina (currently Serbia). I would
like to know if there are any Jewish records (vital records or
residents records) >from this town surviving today? Or perhaps general
records? My gg-grandfather was born and buried there, and it would be
very interesting to try and locate some more data about his family.

Thank you on advance
Amit Naor
Israel


British Naturalizations for Kupishokers #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Very often, there are resources which we neglect to take advantage
of in our research into our family trees as we don't realize that
some of our family may have wandered to a location in the world we
were not aware of.  One such resource is the British Naturalizations
which are located on Ancestry.com.

It was brought to my attention that these records were available by
another researcher and that he had found a number of naturalizations
for individuals >from my ancestral shtetl of Kupiskis, Lithuania. 
I recognized the family names, but did not realize that these
branches had ended up in the UK.  In fact, some of the records may
provide much additional information on hard to determine families
such as COHEN where there are 5-7 different families in Kupiskis.

Examples of what was found in these records and what makes them so
valuable are the following:

Morris BERGER, age 24, son of Michael and Betsy BERGER, living at
109 Brick Lane, Spitalfields, London, a veneer merchant, unmarried. 
Naturalization dated April 23, 1900.

Samuel BERGER, age 28, born February 14, 1883, son of Michael and
Rebecca BERGER, living at 13 Ferncliff Road, Dalston, London,
ironmonger's manager, married with children Beatrice, 5, Montagne, 3,
and Care, 6.  Naturalization dated October 12, 1911.

Abraham COHEN, age 32, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married
with children Rachel, 11, Solomon, 8, Ada, 5, Sophy, 3, and Fanny, 1. 
Naturalization dated December 4, 1902.

Woolf COHEN, age 29, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married
with children Yetta, 4, John 3, and Ada, 1.  Naturalization dated
December 4, 1902.

Barnett HURWICH, age 39, son of Baer and Bertha HURWICH, living at
16 Battlefield Gardens, Langside, Glasgow, Scotland, cabinetmaker,
married with children Simon, 10, Jacob, 9, Alexander, 7, and
Lazarus, 2.  Naturalization dated October 4, 1907.

Hirsh LEVIN, age , age 34, born February 14, 1877, son of David
Passie LEVIN, living at 125 Victoria Park Road, London, boot and
shoe manufacturer, married with children Esther, 3, and David, 1. 
Naturalization dated July 29, 1911.

Isaac LEVIN, age 35, son of David and Pesha LEVIN, living at 114
Teesdale Street, Hackney Road, London, general cabinet manufacturer,
married with children Bessie, 9, and Ruth, 3.  Naturalization
dated June 2, 1908.

Max ROSEN (originally ROSENKOWITZ), age 28, son of Barnett and
Bertha ROSENKOWITZ, living at 88 Stock Street, Cheetham, Manchester,
a painter, married with child Harris Rosen, 5.  Naturalization
dated July 19, 1904.

Morris SELIGMAN, age 26, son of Kalman and Deborah SELIGMAN, living
at 134 Old Montagne Street, Whitechapel, London, bootmaker, married
with no children.  Naturalization dated February 25, 1897.

Given the above information, researchers can then avail themselves
of the British Census records as well as Kupiskis records which are
to be found on the All Lithuania Database records on the LitvakSIG
site and the Ukmerge District shutterfly site.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

MODERATOR: Please restrict the use of "Re:" in the Subject line to
references to the Subject line of a previous submission to which
you are responding.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen British Naturalizations for Kupishokers #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Very often, there are resources which we neglect to take advantage
of in our research into our family trees as we don't realize that
some of our family may have wandered to a location in the world we
were not aware of.  One such resource is the British Naturalizations
which are located on Ancestry.com.

It was brought to my attention that these records were available by
another researcher and that he had found a number of naturalizations
for individuals >from my ancestral shtetl of Kupiskis, Lithuania. 
I recognized the family names, but did not realize that these
branches had ended up in the UK.  In fact, some of the records may
provide much additional information on hard to determine families
such as COHEN where there are 5-7 different families in Kupiskis.

Examples of what was found in these records and what makes them so
valuable are the following:

Morris BERGER, age 24, son of Michael and Betsy BERGER, living at
109 Brick Lane, Spitalfields, London, a veneer merchant, unmarried. 
Naturalization dated April 23, 1900.

Samuel BERGER, age 28, born February 14, 1883, son of Michael and
Rebecca BERGER, living at 13 Ferncliff Road, Dalston, London,
ironmonger's manager, married with children Beatrice, 5, Montagne, 3,
and Care, 6.  Naturalization dated October 12, 1911.

Abraham COHEN, age 32, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married
with children Rachel, 11, Solomon, 8, Ada, 5, Sophy, 3, and Fanny, 1. 
Naturalization dated December 4, 1902.

Woolf COHEN, age 29, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married
with children Yetta, 4, John 3, and Ada, 1.  Naturalization dated
December 4, 1902.

Barnett HURWICH, age 39, son of Baer and Bertha HURWICH, living at
16 Battlefield Gardens, Langside, Glasgow, Scotland, cabinetmaker,
married with children Simon, 10, Jacob, 9, Alexander, 7, and
Lazarus, 2.  Naturalization dated October 4, 1907.

Hirsh LEVIN, age , age 34, born February 14, 1877, son of David
Passie LEVIN, living at 125 Victoria Park Road, London, boot and
shoe manufacturer, married with children Esther, 3, and David, 1. 
Naturalization dated July 29, 1911.

Isaac LEVIN, age 35, son of David and Pesha LEVIN, living at 114
Teesdale Street, Hackney Road, London, general cabinet manufacturer,
married with children Bessie, 9, and Ruth, 3.  Naturalization
dated June 2, 1908.

Max ROSEN (originally ROSENKOWITZ), age 28, son of Barnett and
Bertha ROSENKOWITZ, living at 88 Stock Street, Cheetham, Manchester,
a painter, married with child Harris Rosen, 5.  Naturalization
dated July 19, 1904.

Morris SELIGMAN, age 26, son of Kalman and Deborah SELIGMAN, living
at 134 Old Montagne Street, Whitechapel, London, bootmaker, married
with no children.  Naturalization dated February 25, 1897.

Given the above information, researchers can then avail themselves
of the British Census records as well as Kupiskis records which are
to be found on the All Lithuania Database records on the LitvakSIG
site and the Ukmerge District shutterfly site.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

MODERATOR: Please restrict the use of "Re:" in the Subject line to
references to the Subject line of a previous submission to which
you are responding.


Re: British Naturalizations for Kupishokers #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Very often, there are resources which we neglect to take advantage of in
our research into our family trees as we don't realize that some of our
family may have wandered to a location in the world we were not aware of.

One such resource is the British Naturalizations which are located on
Ancestry.com. It was brought to my attention that these records were
available by another researcher and that he had found a number of
naturalizations for individuals >from my ancestral shtetl of Kupiskis,
Lithuania. I recognized the family names, but did not realize that these
branches had ended up in the UK. In fact, some of the records may provide
much additional information on hard to determine families such as COHEN
where there are 5-7 different families in Kupiskis.

Examples of what was found in these records and what makes them so
valuable are the following: Morris BERGER, age 24, son of Michael and
Betsy BERGER, living at 109 Brick Lane, Spitalfields, London, a veneer
merchant, unmarried. Naturalization dated April 23, 1900. Samuel BERGER,
age 28, born February 14, 1883, son of Michael and Rebecca BERGER, living
at 13 Ferncliff Road, Dalston, London, ironmonger's manager, married with
children Beatrice, 5, Montagne, 3, and Care, 6. Naturalization dated
October 12, 1911.

Abraham COHEN, age 32, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married with
children Rachel, 11, Solomon, 8, Ada, 5, Sophy, 3, and Fanny, 1
Naturalization dated December 4, 1902. Woolf COHEN, age 29, son of
Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4 Fournier Street, Spitalfields,
London, boot manufacturer, married with children Yetta, 4, John 3,
and Ada, 1. Naturalization dated December 4, 1902.

Barnett HURWICH, age 39, son of Baer and Bertha HURWICH, living at
16 Battlefield Gardens, Langside, Glasgow, Scotland, cabinetmaker,
married with children Simon, 10, Jacob, 9, Alexander, 7, and Lazarus, 2.
Naturalization dated October 4, 1907.

Hirsh LEVIN, age , age 34, born February 14, 1877, son of David Passie
LEVIN, living at 125 Victoria Park Road, London, boot and shoe manufacturer,
married with children Esther, 3, and David, 1. Naturalization dated July 29,
1911. Isaac LEVIN, age 35, son of David and Pesha LEVIN, living at 114
Teesdale Street, Hackney Road, London, general cabinet manufacturer,
married with children Bessie, 9, and Ruth, 3. Naturalization dated June 2,
1908.

Max ROSEN (originally ROSENKOWITZ), age 28, son of Barnett and Bertha
ROSENKOWITZ, living at 88 Stock Street, Cheetham, Manchester, a painter,
married with child Harris Rosen, 5. Naturalization dated July 19, 1904.

Morris SELIGMAN, age 26, son of Kalman and Deborah SELIGMAN, living at
134 Old Montagne Street, Whitechapel, London, bootmaker, married with
no children. Naturalization dated February 25, 1897.

Given the above information, researchers can then avail themselves of
the British Census records as well as Kupiskis records which are to be
found on the All Lithuania Database records on the LitvakSIG site and
the Ukmerge District Shutterfly site.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: British Naturalizations for Kupishokers #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz
 

Very often, there are resources which we neglect to take advantage of in
our research into our family trees as we don't realize that some of our
family may have wandered to a location in the world we were not aware of.

One such resource is the British Naturalizations which are located on
Ancestry.com. It was brought to my attention that these records were
available by another researcher and that he had found a number of
naturalizations for individuals >from my ancestral shtetl of Kupiskis,
Lithuania. I recognized the family names, but did not realize that these
branches had ended up in the UK. In fact, some of the records may provide
much additional information on hard to determine families such as COHEN
where there are 5-7 different families in Kupiskis.

Examples of what was found in these records and what makes them so
valuable are the following: Morris BERGER, age 24, son of Michael and
Betsy BERGER, living at 109 Brick Lane, Spitalfields, London, a veneer
merchant, unmarried. Naturalization dated April 23, 1900. Samuel BERGER,
age 28, born February 14, 1883, son of Michael and Rebecca BERGER, living
at 13 Ferncliff Road, Dalston, London, ironmonger's manager, married with
children Beatrice, 5, Montagne, 3, and Care, 6. Naturalization dated
October 12, 1911.

Abraham COHEN, age 32, son of Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4
Fournier Street, Spitalfields, London, boot manufacturer, married with
children Rachel, 11, Solomon, 8, Ada, 5, Sophy, 3, and Fanny, 1
Naturalization dated December 4, 1902. Woolf COHEN, age 29, son of
Harris and Fanny COHEN, living at 4 Fournier Street, Spitalfields,
London, boot manufacturer, married with children Yetta, 4, John 3,
and Ada, 1. Naturalization dated December 4, 1902.

Barnett HURWICH, age 39, son of Baer and Bertha HURWICH, living at
16 Battlefield Gardens, Langside, Glasgow, Scotland, cabinetmaker,
married with children Simon, 10, Jacob, 9, Alexander, 7, and Lazarus, 2.
Naturalization dated October 4, 1907.

Hirsh LEVIN, age , age 34, born February 14, 1877, son of David Passie
LEVIN, living at 125 Victoria Park Road, London, boot and shoe manufacturer,
married with children Esther, 3, and David, 1. Naturalization dated July 29,
1911. Isaac LEVIN, age 35, son of David and Pesha LEVIN, living at 114
Teesdale Street, Hackney Road, London, general cabinet manufacturer,
married with children Bessie, 9, and Ruth, 3. Naturalization dated June 2,
1908.

Max ROSEN (originally ROSENKOWITZ), age 28, son of Barnett and Bertha
ROSENKOWITZ, living at 88 Stock Street, Cheetham, Manchester, a painter,
married with child Harris Rosen, 5. Naturalization dated July 19, 1904.

Morris SELIGMAN, age 26, son of Kalman and Deborah SELIGMAN, living at
134 Old Montagne Street, Whitechapel, London, bootmaker, married with
no children. Naturalization dated February 25, 1897.

Given the above information, researchers can then avail themselves of
the British Census records as well as Kupiskis records which are to be
found on the All Lithuania Database records on the LitvakSIG site and
the Ukmerge District Shutterfly site.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Amit N
 

Hello,

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?

Thank you,
Amit Naor
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Amit N
 

Hello,

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?

Thank you,
Amit Naor
Israel


Hyman MENDLE(MENDEL) #general

steveboler@...
 

Hi folks,
Problems with Incoming Passenger Lists UK.
Have Hyman MENDLE b. 1879 (possibly Vilnius).
Only Uk Census 1901 which is probally him as a boarder with the Lewis
family in Manchester. Nothing for 1891 or 1911. Married 1913
Liverpool - father Jacob Mendle deceased. Assuming he came to the Uk
between 1891 and 1901.
Problem I cannot find his entry into the UK in Shipping or Alien lists.

Any help really appreciated.

Steve Boler - Italy
steveboler@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hyman MENDLE(MENDEL) #general

steveboler@...
 

Hi folks,
Problems with Incoming Passenger Lists UK.
Have Hyman MENDLE b. 1879 (possibly Vilnius).
Only Uk Census 1901 which is probally him as a boarder with the Lewis
family in Manchester. Nothing for 1891 or 1911. Married 1913
Liverpool - father Jacob Mendle deceased. Assuming he came to the Uk
between 1891 and 1901.
Problem I cannot find his entry into the UK in Shipping or Alien lists.

Any help really appreciated.

Steve Boler - Italy
steveboler@gmail.com


Member's Email Bouncing #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

If LitvakSIG Member Janet Damm sees this message, please provide me
with your new email address. Or, if you know Janet's email address,
please let me know.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim, President, LitvakSIG

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Member's Email Bouncing #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

If LitvakSIG Member Janet Damm sees this message, please provide me
with your new email address. Or, if you know Janet's email address,
please let me know.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim, President, LitvakSIG

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno Schulz (1892-1942,) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno Schulz (1892-1942,) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org


Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major Jewish
and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv, provided
by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the
Ring Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynok (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynok around
the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above
the city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of
buildings and roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate
sheet now lost, or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military
security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly, the
adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic family
name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a
German hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major Jewish
and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv, provided
by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the
Ring Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynok (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynok around
the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above
the city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of
buildings and roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate
sheet now lost, or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military
security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly, the
adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic family
name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a
German hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


Re: Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
During WW1 Germans took central Poland as the result of their
offensive and the "Great retreat" of Russian Army in 1915.
Poland was under German control until the defeat of Germany in 1918.
Possibly, in 1920 the officials in Lodz still used blanks of
the documents printed during the German occupation.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv-Lwow-Lemberg, Ukraine



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question about use of German in Polish documents
From: Apollo Israel <apollo@netvision.net.il>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:54:52 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
During WW1 Germans took central Poland as the result of their
offensive and the "Great retreat" of Russian Army in 1915.
Poland was under German control until the defeat of Germany in 1918.
Possibly, in 1920 the officials in Lodz still used blanks of
the documents printed during the German occupation.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv-Lwow-Lemberg, Ukraine



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question about use of German in Polish documents
From: Apollo Israel <apollo@netvision.net.il>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:54:52 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.

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