Date   

ROTSZYLD from central Poland #general

Steven Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Someone was attempting to contact me via Family Tree of the Jewish People
regarding Szamaj ROTSZYLD (of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Poland) , the half-
brother of my ancestor, Yakov BLUMENSON, a Hassidic rabbi near Przedborz,
Poland.

If you are that person, please try contacting me again. Your message got
deleted after getting stuck in my spam folder.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROTSZYLD from central Poland #general

Steven Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Someone was attempting to contact me via Family Tree of the Jewish People
regarding Szamaj ROTSZYLD (of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Poland) , the half-
brother of my ancestor, Yakov BLUMENSON, a Hassidic rabbi near Przedborz,
Poland.

If you are that person, please try contacting me again. Your message got
deleted after getting stuck in my spam folder.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia, USA


Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Kansas City #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor
 

JEWISH GENEALOGY IS COMING TO THE KANSAS CITY AREA

We are forming a new Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Kansas City
(JGSGKC).
If you are in the Kansas City area please join us at our first meeting.

Monday evening, January 22, 2018
6:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Johnson County Central Resource Library (Logan Room)
9875 W. 87th Street, Overland Park, Kansas

At the meeting, we’ll ask you to tell us about your Jewish genealogy
interests
and about the kind of programs and presentations that would be most useful
to you. We’ll also spend some time discussing some administrative stuff
… e.g. what day of the week and time of day is best for our program
meetings,
developing a web and social media presence, etc. If time permits, we’ll
have a
short presentation about some basic Jewish family history resources that are
available for your research.

Our goals are to:
* Help you learn about the most current methods, resources,
technologies,
and techniques to help you achieve your goals;
* Help you network with other researchers whose ancestors were >from the
same old country areas as yours;
* Keep you up-to-date with occasional e-mail messages and announcements
>from discussion lists on the Web, and with regular meetings
through the year.

For more information or if you have any questions please contact:
Ron Doctor, rddpdx@gmail.com <rddpdx@gmail.com>, or,
Richard Rosenstock, richard@rosenstock.net <richard@rosenstock.net>

We’re looking forward to meeting you.

Ron
--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Interim President
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Kansas City (JGS GKC)
and
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group (KDRG)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Overland Park, Kansas USA
and
Board Member and Past Coordinator
JewishGen Ukraine Special Interest Group (Ukraine SIG)

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from
Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Kansas City #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor
 

JEWISH GENEALOGY IS COMING TO THE KANSAS CITY AREA

We are forming a new Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Kansas City
(JGSGKC).
If you are in the Kansas City area please join us at our first meeting.

Monday evening, January 22, 2018
6:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Johnson County Central Resource Library (Logan Room)
9875 W. 87th Street, Overland Park, Kansas

At the meeting, we’ll ask you to tell us about your Jewish genealogy
interests
and about the kind of programs and presentations that would be most useful
to you. We’ll also spend some time discussing some administrative stuff
… e.g. what day of the week and time of day is best for our program
meetings,
developing a web and social media presence, etc. If time permits, we’ll
have a
short presentation about some basic Jewish family history resources that are
available for your research.

Our goals are to:
* Help you learn about the most current methods, resources,
technologies,
and techniques to help you achieve your goals;
* Help you network with other researchers whose ancestors were >from the
same old country areas as yours;
* Keep you up-to-date with occasional e-mail messages and announcements
>from discussion lists on the Web, and with regular meetings
through the year.

For more information or if you have any questions please contact:
Ron Doctor, rddpdx@gmail.com <rddpdx@gmail.com>, or,
Richard Rosenstock, richard@rosenstock.net <richard@rosenstock.net>

We’re looking forward to meeting you.

Ron
--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Interim President
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Kansas City (JGS GKC)
and
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group (KDRG)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Overland Park, Kansas USA
and
Board Member and Past Coordinator
JewishGen Ukraine Special Interest Group (Ukraine SIG)

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from
Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


(UK) National Archives Opening of Prisoner of War Archives #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The (UK) National Archives announced they are opening their prisoner of war
(WW II) archives. These documents were transferred to the National Archives
in December 2014. There are approximately 190,000 records of persons
captured in German-occupied territory during World War II, primarily Allied
service men (including Canadians, South Africans, Australians, New
Zealanders, British and Allied civilians and some nurses. There are also
cars for American, Norwegian, Chinese, Arab and Cypriot origins.

The new collection (WO 416) also includes several thousand records of
deceased allied airmen whose bodies were found near their downed aircrafts.
While these airmen were never prisoners of war, these records act as records
of death.

The records are cards-some persons have up to 15 cards, but most have only
one or two. It is not catalogued by name of individual for privacy reasons
as some may still be living. The National Archives has started to catalogue
the entire series and they have opened the records for those who were born
more than 100 years ago or if they have proof of death.

To read more see:
http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/opening-prisoner-war-collection/

To browse the collection go to:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14541141

For those records that have not yet been digitized you can order the records
in advance for when you visit the Kew ( the National Archives) or you can
request a quotation for a copy to be sent to you. The price will vary
depending on the amount of copying. When you click on the name of the person
you are researching , click on details. There you will get a transcription
of information they have plus the option to order in advance or request a
copy.

Not all service personnel have cards as they were removed >from the
collection to be used as evidence to support claims by Prisoners of War
after World War II. These cards, for the most part, were not returned but
may form part of the personnel's service record which may be held by
Veteran's agency See:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records
[or https://tinyurl.com/z85w7ba --Mod.]

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom (UK) National Archives Opening of Prisoner of War Archives #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The (UK) National Archives announced they are opening their prisoner of war
(WW II) archives. These documents were transferred to the National Archives
in December 2014. There are approximately 190,000 records of persons
captured in German-occupied territory during World War II, primarily Allied
service men (including Canadians, South Africans, Australians, New
Zealanders, British and Allied civilians and some nurses. There are also
cars for American, Norwegian, Chinese, Arab and Cypriot origins.

The new collection (WO 416) also includes several thousand records of
deceased allied airmen whose bodies were found near their downed aircrafts.
While these airmen were never prisoners of war, these records act as records
of death.

The records are cards-some persons have up to 15 cards, but most have only
one or two. It is not catalogued by name of individual for privacy reasons
as some may still be living. The National Archives has started to catalogue
the entire series and they have opened the records for those who were born
more than 100 years ago or if they have proof of death.

To read more see:
http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/opening-prisoner-war-collection/

To browse the collection go to:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14541141

For those records that have not yet been digitized you can order the records
in advance for when you visit the Kew ( the National Archives) or you can
request a quotation for a copy to be sent to you. The price will vary
depending on the amount of copying. When you click on the name of the person
you are researching , click on details. There you will get a transcription
of information they have plus the option to order in advance or request a
copy.

Not all service personnel have cards as they were removed >from the
collection to be used as evidence to support claims by Prisoners of War
after World War II. These cards, for the most part, were not returned but
may form part of the personnel's service record which may be held by
Veteran's agency See:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records
[or https://tinyurl.com/z85w7ba --Mod.]

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Date of death for MARX of Tuebingen and Chicago? #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Hallo

I am looking for the date of death for Ludwig MARX, born in Tuebingen on
12/25/1890, Married on 10/4/1928. He came to Chicago before 1939 with
his wife Paula BAER of Mosbach

thank you for your helping

kind regards
 Hansmartin UNGER, St. Galen,m Switzerland

=============
FAMILY NAMES - Write the surnames (Family names) of people you are
researching with ** all capital letters** every time you write
them in any part of your Email to GerSIG's Email list.

Example: I am researching Albert EINSTEIN >from Ulm, on the Donau, Germany.

*** Don't *** use ALL CAPITALS for your name, first names, city names,
country names or any other text.
Use ** double asterisks ** for emphasis.


German SIG #Germany Date of death for MARX of Tuebingen and Chicago? #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Hallo

I am looking for the date of death for Ludwig MARX, born in Tuebingen on
12/25/1890, Married on 10/4/1928. He came to Chicago before 1939 with
his wife Paula BAER of Mosbach

thank you for your helping

kind regards
 Hansmartin UNGER, St. Galen,m Switzerland

=============
FAMILY NAMES - Write the surnames (Family names) of people you are
researching with ** all capital letters** every time you write
them in any part of your Email to GerSIG's Email list.

Example: I am researching Albert EINSTEIN >from Ulm, on the Donau, Germany.

*** Don't *** use ALL CAPITALS for your name, first names, city names,
country names or any other text.
Use ** double asterisks ** for emphasis.


Two Sisters, two ship manifests, one name. #galicia

Itzhak Epstein
 

A family that I am researching had seven children. Among them were
Sara who was born in 1889 and Malka who was born in 1891.

They left Przemysl for New York in several groups. A ship manifest
shows that Malke, age 11, arrived on February 1, 1903 on La Lorraine
(the French Line) with her older sisters (ages 26 and 17), an 8 year old
niece, and a baby nephew. Another manifest shows that Malke, age 11,
arrived on June 28, 1904 on the Noordam (the Holland America Line)
with her mother and 9 year old sister. All family members are accounted
for in ship manifests except for Sara. The 1905 NYS census accounts for
the family that includes Sarah, 16, and Mollie, 14.

My tentative conclusion is that the family bought a half price ticket for
Malka, then in January 1903 they used it for her older sister Sara. Malka
herself then came to America in 1904, also as an 11 year old. Why,
however, could Sara not travel as an 11 year old under her own name?

How did shipping lines determine eligibility for a 12 or under half price
ticket? Were there documents that had to be provided in Galicia or upon
boarding?

Itzhak Epstein
New York, NY
<iegen@earthlink.net>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Two Sisters, two ship manifests, one name. #galicia

Itzhak Epstein
 

A family that I am researching had seven children. Among them were
Sara who was born in 1889 and Malka who was born in 1891.

They left Przemysl for New York in several groups. A ship manifest
shows that Malke, age 11, arrived on February 1, 1903 on La Lorraine
(the French Line) with her older sisters (ages 26 and 17), an 8 year old
niece, and a baby nephew. Another manifest shows that Malke, age 11,
arrived on June 28, 1904 on the Noordam (the Holland America Line)
with her mother and 9 year old sister. All family members are accounted
for in ship manifests except for Sara. The 1905 NYS census accounts for
the family that includes Sarah, 16, and Mollie, 14.

My tentative conclusion is that the family bought a half price ticket for
Malka, then in January 1903 they used it for her older sister Sara. Malka
herself then came to America in 1904, also as an 11 year old. Why,
however, could Sara not travel as an 11 year old under her own name?

How did shipping lines determine eligibility for a 12 or under half price
ticket? Were there documents that had to be provided in Galicia or upon
boarding?

Itzhak Epstein
New York, NY
<iegen@earthlink.net>


FRIEDMANN from Miskolc #hungary

oliverbryk@...
 

I am looking for information about the ancestry (and siblings, if any) =
of Peter FRIEDMANN, Dr. Med., born 1846 in Miskolc, died 1919 in =
Vienna; his parents may have been Isak FRIEDMANN and Rosa FRIEDMANN =
(KLEIN) about whom I have no data.

I shall be grateful for any applicable data.

Oliver BRYK (San Francisco) oliverbryk@comcast.net

PS I can read German but not Magyar.=


Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

In response to Hilary's query, in this case, Marcus WOLF was listed as a
"servitor communitatis Judaicae habens conventionem."  Google roughly
translates this as "service of the Jewish Community having executed
agreement."  Another man was listed in this same census as the Rabbi, so
Marcus may have been a contracted administrator or caretaker of the
synagogue, or served the Jewish Community in some other capacity.

For Marcus WOLF, the 1838 Census says, "extreme pauper, servitus vitam
sustentat," translated by Google as "extremely poor, serving sustains life."

These censuses were transcribed many years ago, before resources such as
Google Translate were available, which accounts for the slight
difference in translation.

In other cases where occupations are identified in these censuses,
"servant" in the modern sense applied.

Hope this helps.

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Other Hungarian Census database
Milwaukee, WI

Subject: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses
From: hilary2@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2018 21:04:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

There are two censuses of Hunszdorf (now Huncovce, Slovakia) that contain unusual references to servitude with respect to my ancestor/s, Marcus Wolf/f, for which I've been unable to obtain a meaningful explanation - although perhaps the translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since 1729; servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor, occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA


Re: Tornyosnemeti Moskovits #hungary

Beth Long
 

Your best bet is not the town hall, but rather the archive. You can check online
http://bazleveltar.hu/news.php Even with the most restrictive interpretation of the law, anything 100 years old or more should be accessible.

Quickest way to determine whether these are your relatives is to have a look at the Yad Vashem lists, filtering for name and town.


Beth Long
Reno Nevada USA

________________________________
From: "Peter Bakos pgbakos@hotmail.com" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 10:09 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Tornyosnemeti Moskovits



Last fall when going to Kassa/Kosice I passed through Tornyosnemeti, a small town next to the border with Slovakia and which is quite close to Sena/Szina.


As I was walking past the church my eye caught a very large memorial which read "Our Martyrs: 1848-1956" under which were inscribed a list of names.

I always scrutinize such monuments as one never knows what may be discovered by so doing.


Lo and behold there appeared the names Moskovits Gyula and Moskovits Gyulane, no further information.


I am assuming this is a town memorial which is erected in the churchyard and the names are not limited to members of the church.


My question is; how do I find out who were this Gyula Moskovits and his wife? Are they, as I suspect, >from Szina and they moved over the new border in 1919? If so, then he was probably the brother of my great grandmother.


I was going to go up there, but my Hungarian is rudimentary, I have no idea when the town hall is open, and with the Orban regime's tightening of access to public records, whether they would even give me any information.


Hints anybody, Please.


Peter Bakos (normally, St. Crespin, France, but temporarily in Budapest) searching, for now, MAYERHOFFER, MOSKOVITS, HERSKOVITS, >from Abauj Megye and SCHUSTER >from Moson Megye


Hungary SIG #Hungary FRIEDMANN from Miskolc #hungary

oliverbryk@...
 

I am looking for information about the ancestry (and siblings, if any) =
of Peter FRIEDMANN, Dr. Med., born 1846 in Miskolc, died 1919 in =
Vienna; his parents may have been Isak FRIEDMANN and Rosa FRIEDMANN =
(KLEIN) about whom I have no data.

I shall be grateful for any applicable data.

Oliver BRYK (San Francisco) oliverbryk@comcast.net

PS I can read German but not Magyar.=


Hungary SIG #Hungary Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

In response to Hilary's query, in this case, Marcus WOLF was listed as a
"servitor communitatis Judaicae habens conventionem."  Google roughly
translates this as "service of the Jewish Community having executed
agreement."  Another man was listed in this same census as the Rabbi, so
Marcus may have been a contracted administrator or caretaker of the
synagogue, or served the Jewish Community in some other capacity.

For Marcus WOLF, the 1838 Census says, "extreme pauper, servitus vitam
sustentat," translated by Google as "extremely poor, serving sustains life."

These censuses were transcribed many years ago, before resources such as
Google Translate were available, which accounts for the slight
difference in translation.

In other cases where occupations are identified in these censuses,
"servant" in the modern sense applied.

Hope this helps.

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Other Hungarian Census database
Milwaukee, WI

Subject: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses
From: hilary2@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2018 21:04:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

There are two censuses of Hunszdorf (now Huncovce, Slovakia) that contain unusual references to servitude with respect to my ancestor/s, Marcus Wolf/f, for which I've been unable to obtain a meaningful explanation - although perhaps the translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since 1729; servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor, occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Tornyosnemeti Moskovits #hungary

Beth Long
 

Your best bet is not the town hall, but rather the archive. You can check online
http://bazleveltar.hu/news.php Even with the most restrictive interpretation of the law, anything 100 years old or more should be accessible.

Quickest way to determine whether these are your relatives is to have a look at the Yad Vashem lists, filtering for name and town.


Beth Long
Reno Nevada USA

________________________________
From: "Peter Bakos pgbakos@hotmail.com" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 10:09 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Tornyosnemeti Moskovits



Last fall when going to Kassa/Kosice I passed through Tornyosnemeti, a small town next to the border with Slovakia and which is quite close to Sena/Szina.


As I was walking past the church my eye caught a very large memorial which read "Our Martyrs: 1848-1956" under which were inscribed a list of names.

I always scrutinize such monuments as one never knows what may be discovered by so doing.


Lo and behold there appeared the names Moskovits Gyula and Moskovits Gyulane, no further information.


I am assuming this is a town memorial which is erected in the churchyard and the names are not limited to members of the church.


My question is; how do I find out who were this Gyula Moskovits and his wife? Are they, as I suspect, >from Szina and they moved over the new border in 1919? If so, then he was probably the brother of my great grandmother.


I was going to go up there, but my Hungarian is rudimentary, I have no idea when the town hall is open, and with the Orban regime's tightening of access to public records, whether they would even give me any information.


Hints anybody, Please.


Peter Bakos (normally, St. Crespin, France, but temporarily in Budapest) searching, for now, MAYERHOFFER, MOSKOVITS, HERSKOVITS, >from Abauj Megye and SCHUSTER >from Moson Megye


Re: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses #hungary

esideman@...
 

Dear Hilary,
When I read the t wo explanations, they seemed to make sense to me. I
interpreted "Servant of the Jewish community" as possibly a handyman,
providing services upon request. If they were of a physical labor =
nature,
that could be interpreted as "servant" (menial work). As for "Extremely
poor, occupation as a servant to endure," there is great dignity to this
statement. I read it mainly as enduring while earning a meager =
livelihood by
serving others. Enduring is noble, and goes back to Job.=20
My Hungarian is not great, but I may be able to look at the exact words =
and
glean more >from them. Might you be able to send me the Hungarian =
statements?
I'll be glad to see what else I can understand >from the original. My
parents were Hungarian speaking, and I have a basic knowledge of the
language.=20
How wonderful that you were able to go back all the way to 1771 while
searching for your ancestors!
Kind regards,
Eva Sideman
esideman@comcast.net

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]=20
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 1:04 AM
To: h-sig digest recipients <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: h-sig digest: January 18, 2018

H-SIG Digest for Thursday, January 18, 2018.

1. Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses 2.
Tornyosnemeti Moskovits 3. Schuster in Papa and Oroszvar 4.
Herskovits/Mayerhoffer Abauj Szina 5. RE: REINITZ/REINICZ 6. New =
February
Classes offered by JewishGen/Education

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian =
Censuses
From: hilary2@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2018 21:04:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

There are two censuses of Hunszdorf (now Huncovce, Slovakia) that =
contain
unusual references to servitude with respect to my ancestor/s, Marcus
Wolf/f, for which I've been unable to obtain a meaningful explanation -
although perhaps the translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since =
1729;
servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor,
occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these
comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA
WOLF Bucovce, =C2 Huncovce,=C2 Jelsava, Kosice, Kral'ova Lehota, =
Liptovsky
Hradok, Maly Slavkov,=C2 Nehre,=C2 Nizne Ruzbachy, Porubka, Revuca,=C2 =
Sulin,=C2
Satu Mare, Visne Ruzbachy NUERENBERGER Frankova, Hagy, Krizova Ves, =
Olublo,
Podolinic, Spisska Stara Ves, Vysne Ruzbachy, Zalesie, Zilinarhaps the
translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since =
1729;
servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor,
occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these
comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA
WOLF Bucovce, =C2=A0Huncovce,=C2=A0Jelsava, Kosice, Kral'ova Lehota, =
Liptovsky
Hradok, Maly Slavkov,=C2=A0Nehre,=C2=A0Nizne Ruzbachy, Porubka,
Revuca,=C2=A0Sulin,=C2=A0Satu Mare, Visne Ruzbachy NUERENBERGER =
Frankova, Hagy,
Krizova Ves, Olublo, Podolinic, Spisska Stara Ves, Vysne Ruzbachy, =
Zalesie,
Zilina


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses #hungary

esideman@...
 

Dear Hilary,
When I read the t wo explanations, they seemed to make sense to me. I
interpreted "Servant of the Jewish community" as possibly a handyman,
providing services upon request. If they were of a physical labor =
nature,
that could be interpreted as "servant" (menial work). As for "Extremely
poor, occupation as a servant to endure," there is great dignity to this
statement. I read it mainly as enduring while earning a meager =
livelihood by
serving others. Enduring is noble, and goes back to Job.=20
My Hungarian is not great, but I may be able to look at the exact words =
and
glean more >from them. Might you be able to send me the Hungarian =
statements?
I'll be glad to see what else I can understand >from the original. My
parents were Hungarian speaking, and I have a basic knowledge of the
language.=20
How wonderful that you were able to go back all the way to 1771 while
searching for your ancestors!
Kind regards,
Eva Sideman
esideman@comcast.net

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]=20
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 1:04 AM
To: h-sig digest recipients <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: h-sig digest: January 18, 2018

H-SIG Digest for Thursday, January 18, 2018.

1. Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian Censuses 2.
Tornyosnemeti Moskovits 3. Schuster in Papa and Oroszvar 4.
Herskovits/Mayerhoffer Abauj Szina 5. RE: REINITZ/REINICZ 6. New =
February
Classes offered by JewishGen/Education

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Meaning of "Servant" in 18th and 19th Century Hungarian =
Censuses
From: hilary2@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2018 21:04:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

There are two censuses of Hunszdorf (now Huncovce, Slovakia) that =
contain
unusual references to servitude with respect to my ancestor/s, Marcus
Wolf/f, for which I've been unable to obtain a meaningful explanation -
although perhaps the translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since =
1729;
servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor,
occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these
comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA
WOLF Bucovce, =C2 Huncovce,=C2 Jelsava, Kosice, Kral'ova Lehota, =
Liptovsky
Hradok, Maly Slavkov,=C2 Nehre,=C2 Nizne Ruzbachy, Porubka, Revuca,=C2 =
Sulin,=C2
Satu Mare, Visne Ruzbachy NUERENBERGER Frankova, Hagy, Krizova Ves, =
Olublo,
Podolinic, Spisska Stara Ves, Vysne Ruzbachy, Zalesie, Zilinarhaps the
translation is at the bottom of this.

The census of 1771 describes Marcus Wolff as being "in Hungary since =
1729;
servant of the Jewish community."

And according to the census of 1838, Marcus Wolf was "extremely poor,
occupation as a servant to endure."

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who has any insight into these
comments.

Thank you.

Hilary [Stein] Osofsky
Orinda, CA
WOLF Bucovce, =C2=A0Huncovce,=C2=A0Jelsava, Kosice, Kral'ova Lehota, =
Liptovsky
Hradok, Maly Slavkov,=C2=A0Nehre,=C2=A0Nizne Ruzbachy, Porubka,
Revuca,=C2=A0Sulin,=C2=A0Satu Mare, Visne Ruzbachy NUERENBERGER =
Frankova, Hagy,
Krizova Ves, Olublo, Podolinic, Spisska Stara Ves, Vysne Ruzbachy, =
Zalesie,
Zilina


(Belgium) Neerpelt, BE Makes Documents Older than 100 Years Old Open to Public #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Neerpelt, BE has announced via Internetgazet, the Digital Archive of Old
Deeds has digitized all civil status documents and documents that are more
than 100 years old are publicly available via dept.Neerpelt.be.
(http://akten.neerpelt.be/) This website is not translated by Chrome so you
will have to use a translation service such as https://translate.google.com
Registration is required with email and password.
You can save, print, view birth, marriage and death certificates >from 1797
to 1917 for residents of Neerpelt and the borough of Sint-Huibrechts-Lille
(SHLille).

See:
http://www.internetgazet.be/neerpelt/digitaal-archief-van-oude-akten.aspx

Neerpelt is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg

The site is in Dutch. However, if you use Chrome as your browser it will
automatically translate the page.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


French SIG #France (Belgium) Neerpelt, BE Makes Documents Older than 100 Years Old Open to Public #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Neerpelt, BE has announced via Internetgazet, the Digital Archive of Old
Deeds has digitized all civil status documents and documents that are more
than 100 years old are publicly available via dept.Neerpelt.be.
(http://akten.neerpelt.be/) This website is not translated by Chrome so you
will have to use a translation service such as https://translate.google.com
Registration is required with email and password.
You can save, print, view birth, marriage and death certificates >from 1797
to 1917 for residents of Neerpelt and the borough of Sint-Huibrechts-Lille
(SHLille).

See:
http://www.internetgazet.be/neerpelt/digitaal-archief-van-oude-akten.aspx

Neerpelt is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg

The site is in Dutch. However, if you use Chrome as your browser it will
automatically translate the page.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

41141 - 41160 of 654793