Date   

Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

At 12:00 AM 1/25/2005, Judith Romney Wegner wrote

As we left England in 1957, I didn't get to attend shivas in my
mother's extensive London-born family, so I don't know whether the
mourners wore black aprons or not. But if they did I would think
this was a gentile influence -- and most likely Dutch, as aprons
(normally white, I suppose) were a standard Dutch item of clothing
and many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; most such London-born Jews families
did have Dutch antecedents.

The pinned-on black ribbon worn by Jewish mourners in America today
is presumably an adaptation of the gentile black-armband tradition;
authentic Jewish tradition is to tear an actual rip in the shirt or
other outer garment worn to the funeral and during the shiva (which
certainly need not be black). Wearing black clothes to a funeral
is a Christian, not Jewish, custom, though many American Jews seem
to have adopted it.

Judith Romney Wegner
I received several private responses to my question and some confirm that
this was the custom in England, Germany and other places.

I am just wondering if this apron was used for "Kriah" (rending of
clothes). People were very poor in the shtetlach and rending a blouse or
dress would be a hardship. The apron would be a solution that complied
with "Kryah" and saved the clothing.

As far as an apron being a Dutch custom, it was very much the custom in
Eastern Europe for Jewish women to wear an apron. I have seen it in many
photos >from Galicia. They wore it when they were not "dressed up" but in
everyday clothing There were two types of apron : The more usual one tied
to the waist and one that looked almost like a long vest, sleeveless and
half covering the dress.

In Chassidic circles women wore (still wear?) a white apron for Shabat and
Yom Kippur.

Susana Leistner Bloch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

At 12:00 AM 1/25/2005, Judith Romney Wegner wrote

As we left England in 1957, I didn't get to attend shivas in my
mother's extensive London-born family, so I don't know whether the
mourners wore black aprons or not. But if they did I would think
this was a gentile influence -- and most likely Dutch, as aprons
(normally white, I suppose) were a standard Dutch item of clothing
and many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; most such London-born Jews families
did have Dutch antecedents.

The pinned-on black ribbon worn by Jewish mourners in America today
is presumably an adaptation of the gentile black-armband tradition;
authentic Jewish tradition is to tear an actual rip in the shirt or
other outer garment worn to the funeral and during the shiva (which
certainly need not be black). Wearing black clothes to a funeral
is a Christian, not Jewish, custom, though many American Jews seem
to have adopted it.

Judith Romney Wegner
I received several private responses to my question and some confirm that
this was the custom in England, Germany and other places.

I am just wondering if this apron was used for "Kriah" (rending of
clothes). People were very poor in the shtetlach and rending a blouse or
dress would be a hardship. The apron would be a solution that complied
with "Kryah" and saved the clothing.

As far as an apron being a Dutch custom, it was very much the custom in
Eastern Europe for Jewish women to wear an apron. I have seen it in many
photos >from Galicia. They wore it when they were not "dressed up" but in
everyday clothing There were two types of apron : The more usual one tied
to the waist and one that looked almost like a long vest, sleeveless and
half covering the dress.

In Chassidic circles women wore (still wear?) a white apron for Shabat and
Yom Kippur.

Susana Leistner Bloch


British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2005 10:15:13 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jrw@... writes:

< many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; >

==that is partly correct, of course. The influx into Britain of
most of the Jews >from Eastern Europe (predominantly Litta) started
in 1880.

==however, the mean life expectancy of Jews born in England around
1880 was probably around 55, and the majority would not have
survived to the age of 70.

< most such London-born Jews families did have Dutch antecedents. >

==Not so. Ashkenazim (mostly >from German speaking countries--Germany,
Austria, Northern France, Bohemia, Holland--and following the Western
Ashkenazi rituals) started arriving in Britain within three decades of
the arrival of the Sefardi Jews >from Holland, and soon outnumbered
them. By the mid-19th century, for sure, they formed by far the larger
and more influential (not necessarily the richer) Jewish communty.

==The Jewish Chronicle (founded 1841) and Jew's College (1855), the
Beth Din, the Chief Rabbinate, United Synagogue ("established" in 1870
by an act of Parliament), were all "Ashkenazi" oriented, and strongly
related to German-Jewish practices. When I left the UK in 1948, the vast
majority of synagogues based their ritual on that of Western Ashkenazim.

==I guess that the confusion of "black" and "apron" stems >from
German/Yiddish "schwartz/schwartze" and "Schuerze[n]/Schirtze[n]"
respectively. This confusion of terms happens frequently in Jewish
folklore and practice, e.g. emptying pockets ("teschlech") for Tashlich,
eating Hamantaschen ("Mohntaschen") on Purim, reciting "Kol Mevasser" on
Hoshanah Rabba (feast of the water supplication).

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2005 10:15:13 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jrw@... writes:

< many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; >

==that is partly correct, of course. The influx into Britain of
most of the Jews >from Eastern Europe (predominantly Litta) started
in 1880.

==however, the mean life expectancy of Jews born in England around
1880 was probably around 55, and the majority would not have
survived to the age of 70.

< most such London-born Jews families did have Dutch antecedents. >

==Not so. Ashkenazim (mostly >from German speaking countries--Germany,
Austria, Northern France, Bohemia, Holland--and following the Western
Ashkenazi rituals) started arriving in Britain within three decades of
the arrival of the Sefardi Jews >from Holland, and soon outnumbered
them. By the mid-19th century, for sure, they formed by far the larger
and more influential (not necessarily the richer) Jewish communty.

==The Jewish Chronicle (founded 1841) and Jew's College (1855), the
Beth Din, the Chief Rabbinate, United Synagogue ("established" in 1870
by an act of Parliament), were all "Ashkenazi" oriented, and strongly
related to German-Jewish practices. When I left the UK in 1948, the vast
majority of synagogues based their ritual on that of Western Ashkenazim.

==I guess that the confusion of "black" and "apron" stems >from
German/Yiddish "schwartz/schwartze" and "Schuerze[n]/Schirtze[n]"
respectively. This confusion of terms happens frequently in Jewish
folklore and practice, e.g. emptying pockets ("teschlech") for Tashlich,
eating Hamantaschen ("Mohntaschen") on Purim, reciting "Kol Mevasser" on
Hoshanah Rabba (feast of the water supplication).

Michael Bernet, New York


pictures on naturalization & citizenship papers #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

My father's US naturalization papers >from 1942 has his picture on it with
his name change on the back.
And my mother's citizenship certificate >from 1931 has her picture on it.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen pictures on naturalization & citizenship papers #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

My father's US naturalization papers >from 1942 has his picture on it with
his name change on the back.
And my mother's citizenship certificate >from 1931 has her picture on it.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland


Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

Susan&David
 

My father was naturalized in Massachusetts 1927. I have the Certificate
of Naturalization. It does not have his picture. I also have another
certificate entitled Certificate of Citizenship issued in 1937. This
one does have his picture.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Alan Steinfeld wrote:

I have seen photographs of the individual on certificates of
naturalization >from the 1950s. Does anyone know when photographs
began to be attached to these documents? Is it likely that a
certificate issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Dean Alan & other genners,

While I cannot attest to the first issuance of a
Certificate of Naturalization including a photograph,
I can offer the information >from those of my
grandparents.

My grandfather was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York
on May 24, 1927. We have the original Certificate of
Citizenship however the photograph was lost. One can
see the glue residue where the photo once was. My
grandmother was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York on
July 30, 1929. On her original Certificate of
Citizenship the photograph is still affixed.

I look forward to postings regarding the earliest
known Certificates with photographs.

Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA
Researching relative to this posting:
WINDWER and variants - Kolomyya and vicinity in
Galicia
RUBINGER - Putila, Czernowitz, Vatra Dorna in Bukovina
---
Alan Steinfeld <alansteinfeld@...> writes:

I have seen photographs of the individual on
certificates of naturalization >from the 1950s. Does
anyone know when photographs began to be attached to
these documents? Is it likely that a certificate
issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

Susan&David
 

My father was naturalized in Massachusetts 1927. I have the Certificate
of Naturalization. It does not have his picture. I also have another
certificate entitled Certificate of Citizenship issued in 1937. This
one does have his picture.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Alan Steinfeld wrote:

I have seen photographs of the individual on certificates of
naturalization >from the 1950s. Does anyone know when photographs
began to be attached to these documents? Is it likely that a
certificate issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Dean Alan & other genners,

While I cannot attest to the first issuance of a
Certificate of Naturalization including a photograph,
I can offer the information >from those of my
grandparents.

My grandfather was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York
on May 24, 1927. We have the original Certificate of
Citizenship however the photograph was lost. One can
see the glue residue where the photo once was. My
grandmother was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York on
July 30, 1929. On her original Certificate of
Citizenship the photograph is still affixed.

I look forward to postings regarding the earliest
known Certificates with photographs.

Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA
Researching relative to this posting:
WINDWER and variants - Kolomyya and vicinity in
Galicia
RUBINGER - Putila, Czernowitz, Vatra Dorna in Bukovina
---
Alan Steinfeld <alansteinfeld@...> writes:

I have seen photographs of the individual on
certificates of naturalization >from the 1950s. Does
anyone know when photographs began to be attached to
these documents? Is it likely that a certificate
issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


1891 census lookup - Liverpool research #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

Please could someone who has access to the 1891 census look up a first
cousin/brother in law of my g-grandfather for me? His name was Jacob Aarons
and his wife was Elizabeth (Moss). He was born in Liverpool in about 1851,
so would be around 40 at the time of the census. I have an 1887 address of 8
Sandon Terrace, Upper Duke Street for him - I assume that this would be in
Liverpool as at the time he was described as Keeper of the Princes Road
Synagogue. In 1888 I have a reference to him living at 1 Hope Place, though
this may be the address of the Liverpool Old Congregation where he was
Keeper, and in 1889 there is a reference to Jacob Aarons, sexton, at 2
Carter Street.

Jacob Aarons and his many brothers and sisters (Mary, Sophia, Solomon,
Caroline, Walter, Alfred, Mitchel, Rachel, Abraham, Rosa) were orphaned in
1874, when the youngest, Rosa was 11. I have managed to trace descendents of
the eldest sibling, Mary as she married her first cousin, Solomon Henry
Myers, older brother of my g-grandfather; and with the help of FreeBMD and
the Jewishgen family finder I have managed to find a living descendent of
the youngest, Rosa. However, what happened to the others is a mystery. In
1871 the family was living at 64 Russell Street Liverpool. In 1881 I have
Mary Aarons/Myers and family living at an address in Liverpool, but no
amount of searching the 1881 census has turned up the other Aarons siblings.
So now I have some leads, >from trade directories supplied by a researcher in
Liverpool, and am hopeful that these may turn up something on this family.

Thank you.

Regards,

Lois Kaufman
London


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom 1891 census lookup - Liverpool research #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

Please could someone who has access to the 1891 census look up a first
cousin/brother in law of my g-grandfather for me? His name was Jacob Aarons
and his wife was Elizabeth (Moss). He was born in Liverpool in about 1851,
so would be around 40 at the time of the census. I have an 1887 address of 8
Sandon Terrace, Upper Duke Street for him - I assume that this would be in
Liverpool as at the time he was described as Keeper of the Princes Road
Synagogue. In 1888 I have a reference to him living at 1 Hope Place, though
this may be the address of the Liverpool Old Congregation where he was
Keeper, and in 1889 there is a reference to Jacob Aarons, sexton, at 2
Carter Street.

Jacob Aarons and his many brothers and sisters (Mary, Sophia, Solomon,
Caroline, Walter, Alfred, Mitchel, Rachel, Abraham, Rosa) were orphaned in
1874, when the youngest, Rosa was 11. I have managed to trace descendents of
the eldest sibling, Mary as she married her first cousin, Solomon Henry
Myers, older brother of my g-grandfather; and with the help of FreeBMD and
the Jewishgen family finder I have managed to find a living descendent of
the youngest, Rosa. However, what happened to the others is a mystery. In
1871 the family was living at 64 Russell Street Liverpool. In 1881 I have
Mary Aarons/Myers and family living at an address in Liverpool, but no
amount of searching the 1881 census has turned up the other Aarons siblings.
So now I have some leads, >from trade directories supplied by a researcher in
Liverpool, and am hopeful that these may turn up something on this family.

Thank you.

Regards,

Lois Kaufman
London


Alien cards at movinghere.org.uk #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

I have tried to find the Alien Card entries on the www.movinghere.org.uk site.

I sent an inquiry to the webmaster at that site and was told to contact The
National Archives for more help. "They should have information, such as alien
cards, on your relatives" I was told.

I haven't yet tried out the suggestion of Harvey Kaplan:

< http://www.movinghere.org.uk/search/default.asp
Search for the phrase alien registration. This will show sample cards. >

< Also try:
http://www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/roots/jewish/pullingittogether/pullingi
ttogether.htm >

I'm sure Harvey's suggestions will prove helpful. Movinghere has only a
limited number of alien cards; the next stop will probably be The National
Archives.

Michael Bernet, New York http://www.mem-ber.net/


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Alien cards at movinghere.org.uk #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

I have tried to find the Alien Card entries on the www.movinghere.org.uk site.

I sent an inquiry to the webmaster at that site and was told to contact The
National Archives for more help. "They should have information, such as alien
cards, on your relatives" I was told.

I haven't yet tried out the suggestion of Harvey Kaplan:

< http://www.movinghere.org.uk/search/default.asp
Search for the phrase alien registration. This will show sample cards. >

< Also try:
http://www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/roots/jewish/pullingittogether/pullingi
ttogether.htm >

I'm sure Harvey's suggestions will prove helpful. Movinghere has only a
limited number of alien cards; the next stop will probably be The National
Archives.

Michael Bernet, New York http://www.mem-ber.net/


Re: Kraslava immigration #latvia

Yekkey@...
 

Jessica,

What do you by "slip stream?"

Dan Nussbaum
New Bedford, Massachusetts

Searching:
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine ROSENTHAL,
S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine; BILD, KASHLEVSKY, KASHILEVSKY-anywhere


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Kraslava immigration #latvia

Yekkey@...
 

Jessica,

What do you by "slip stream?"

Dan Nussbaum
New Bedford, Massachusetts

Searching:
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine ROSENTHAL,
S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine; BILD, KASHLEVSKY, KASHILEVSKY-anywhere


SEARCHING FOR STRICKER AND POLITZER #hungary

VivianeCK2003@...
 

Hello!

This is my first posting in this group.
My mother passed away last year.
Her mother, father and brother, who she loved, perished in Aushwitz.
After the holocaust she remained estranged >from the rest of her family,
choosing to be with my father's family.
My grandfather was Jacob Stricker of Sopron.
He married his first cousin Flora Stricker.
Their children were Elisabeth and Lazlo.
My grandfather's relatives, the Politzers lived in Budapest.
Jacob Stricker funded his sister's (first and married name unkown) journey,
along with her
husband, to the United States on or around 1938 or earlier. They probably
landed in Boston.
To this day, I believe there are relatives of mine in Boston and possibly
elsewhere in the US.
Please contact me if you have any information.

Viviane

vivianeck2003@...

Moderator: Please contact Viviane off-list if you have information. JewishGen procedures request that messages include the full name AND location of the person posting the message.


Hungary SIG #Hungary SEARCHING FOR STRICKER AND POLITZER #hungary

VivianeCK2003@...
 

Hello!

This is my first posting in this group.
My mother passed away last year.
Her mother, father and brother, who she loved, perished in Aushwitz.
After the holocaust she remained estranged >from the rest of her family,
choosing to be with my father's family.
My grandfather was Jacob Stricker of Sopron.
He married his first cousin Flora Stricker.
Their children were Elisabeth and Lazlo.
My grandfather's relatives, the Politzers lived in Budapest.
Jacob Stricker funded his sister's (first and married name unkown) journey,
along with her
husband, to the United States on or around 1938 or earlier. They probably
landed in Boston.
To this day, I believe there are relatives of mine in Boston and possibly
elsewhere in the US.
Please contact me if you have any information.

Viviane

vivianeck2003@...

Moderator: Please contact Viviane off-list if you have information. JewishGen procedures request that messages include the full name AND location of the person posting the message.


Friedrich in Zalalovo tax records #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

This is my first time attempted to use tax records as
sources of information. I would greatly appreciate
some help in answering a couple questions about them.

1) Before Elizabeth Fridrig's name is an abbreviation
Rta. (I think it is an "R".) What does that mean?
Also, is the "g" at the end of her name a normal
variation?

2)In records preceding the one which names Elizabeth
as the tax payer, Elias Fridrich has a word before his
name Pellis (possibly Bellio). Everyone else around
him is marked Judaus. Why would it be different?

Thanks for your help.

Denise Pfalzer
Tampa, Florida


Hungary SIG #Hungary Friedrich in Zalalovo tax records #hungary

d pfalzer <d_pfalzer@...>
 

This is my first time attempted to use tax records as
sources of information. I would greatly appreciate
some help in answering a couple questions about them.

1) Before Elizabeth Fridrig's name is an abbreviation
Rta. (I think it is an "R".) What does that mean?
Also, is the "g" at the end of her name a normal
variation?

2)In records preceding the one which names Elizabeth
as the tax payer, Elias Fridrich has a word before his
name Pellis (possibly Bellio). Everyone else around
him is marked Judaus. Why would it be different?

Thanks for your help.

Denise Pfalzer
Tampa, Florida