Date   
Looking for the names FALIK and FALIKMAN #romania

jfa2000@...
 

I am researching FALIKMAN family, and there are precious few to be found. I would love to hear >from anyone who recognizes that name, either because they are in their tree, or because they personally knew of a FALIKMAN individual. Recently I heard >from a Czernowitz-List member that she has the name Falik Falik (both given and surname) in her family tree, and that perhaps they had dropped the "man" suffix at some time; we actually had a number of naming patterns in common. Additionally, a professional researcher in Czernowitz archives informed me of a Falik Falikman. So, now I am wondering if there are any other folks searching for the name FALIK who might be willing to share information with me, as I should probably begin researching that name, too.

Jessica Attiyeh
La Jolla, California
Researching: FALIKMAN, >from Czernowitz, Yompol, Kizhnikki, Lyubar and vicinity
FALIKMAN, >from Kishinev
GROSS, and ROESSLER, >from Czernowitz and vicinity
MODERATOR NOTE: There are several reseachers listed in the JewishGen Family Finder.

Romania SIG #Romania Looking for the names FALIK and FALIKMAN #romania

jfa2000@...
 

I am researching FALIKMAN family, and there are precious few to be found. I would love to hear >from anyone who recognizes that name, either because they are in their tree, or because they personally knew of a FALIKMAN individual. Recently I heard >from a Czernowitz-List member that she has the name Falik Falik (both given and surname) in her family tree, and that perhaps they had dropped the "man" suffix at some time; we actually had a number of naming patterns in common. Additionally, a professional researcher in Czernowitz archives informed me of a Falik Falikman. So, now I am wondering if there are any other folks searching for the name FALIK who might be willing to share information with me, as I should probably begin researching that name, too.

Jessica Attiyeh
La Jolla, California
Researching: FALIKMAN, >from Czernowitz, Yompol, Kizhnikki, Lyubar and vicinity
FALIKMAN, >from Kishinev
GROSS, and ROESSLER, >from Czernowitz and vicinity
MODERATOR NOTE: There are several reseachers listed in the JewishGen Family Finder.

Re: Destruction of the Jews of Grodno 1941-1944 #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

Since I posted this message, I received a response >from >from Jack Menes in
Israel who provided me with additional information:

There are in fact six volumes. The sixth volume includes a list of almost
3000 Jews who made contributions to the Jewish Kehillah in 1937. The data
include the name and address of the contributor, his profession, and the
amount he contributed. The rest of the volume has German documents and
eyewitness testimonies.

Jack recently converted the list into an Excel
spreadsheet and sent it to me. The list is originally >from the State
Archive in Grodno and was published, as we see, by the Klarsfeld Foundation.
Felix Zandman was also involved in this.

Much of the material in the book was used in war crimes trials of the German
commandants in Grodno.

Because there may be copyright issues to resolve, I am holding off putting
the database on the SIG website. before it can be put on a website.

If anyone can help me find a current address and phone number for the Beate
Klarsfeld Foundation, it might help speed up the getting the necessary
permissions so we can make this database available on the SIG website. It
appears that the Madison Ave. address in NY is not current. Please contact
me by private email.

The data in this database would be very useful to people who have families
from Grodno who might no have immigrated before the Holocaust. In addition,
it might provide the location where your families lived. For those making a
roots trip to Grodno, you might be able to use this database to find the
building where your family lived.

On Jan. 25, 2005, I wrote:
snip
found that they had the following book:
Klarsfeld, Serge, and Beate Klarsfeld Foundation. "Documents Concerning the
Destruction of the Jews of Grodno 1941-1944", New York, N.Y. (515 Madison
Ave, New York 10022): Beate Klarsfeld Foundation, 1985.

In searching the web for more information about this book, it turns out that
there are five volumes that comprise this work. The book is in German.

Has anyone seen these books and if so are there any name lists or a name
index in any of the five volumes?
--snip
Perhaps someone would be willing to report back on what they find in this
book.
Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@...
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Destruction of the Jews of Grodno 1941-1944 #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

Since I posted this message, I received a response >from >from Jack Menes in
Israel who provided me with additional information:

There are in fact six volumes. The sixth volume includes a list of almost
3000 Jews who made contributions to the Jewish Kehillah in 1937. The data
include the name and address of the contributor, his profession, and the
amount he contributed. The rest of the volume has German documents and
eyewitness testimonies.

Jack recently converted the list into an Excel
spreadsheet and sent it to me. The list is originally >from the State
Archive in Grodno and was published, as we see, by the Klarsfeld Foundation.
Felix Zandman was also involved in this.

Much of the material in the book was used in war crimes trials of the German
commandants in Grodno.

Because there may be copyright issues to resolve, I am holding off putting
the database on the SIG website. before it can be put on a website.

If anyone can help me find a current address and phone number for the Beate
Klarsfeld Foundation, it might help speed up the getting the necessary
permissions so we can make this database available on the SIG website. It
appears that the Madison Ave. address in NY is not current. Please contact
me by private email.

The data in this database would be very useful to people who have families
from Grodno who might no have immigrated before the Holocaust. In addition,
it might provide the location where your families lived. For those making a
roots trip to Grodno, you might be able to use this database to find the
building where your family lived.

On Jan. 25, 2005, I wrote:
snip
found that they had the following book:
Klarsfeld, Serge, and Beate Klarsfeld Foundation. "Documents Concerning the
Destruction of the Jews of Grodno 1941-1944", New York, N.Y. (515 Madison
Ave, New York 10022): Beate Klarsfeld Foundation, 1985.

In searching the web for more information about this book, it turns out that
there are five volumes that comprise this work. The book is in German.

Has anyone seen these books and if so are there any name lists or a name
index in any of the five volumes?
--snip
Perhaps someone would be willing to report back on what they find in this
book.
Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@...
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus

R' Elchanan Cohen of Kaunas #rabbinic

meir yohanah
 

Dear RavSig Group,

Does anyone have any information about Rav Elchanan Cohen of Kaunas
who was listed in the All Lithuanian Hamaggid database for 1872.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Elchanan Cohen of Kaunas #rabbinic

meir yohanah
 

Dear RavSig Group,

Does anyone have any information about Rav Elchanan Cohen of Kaunas
who was listed in the All Lithuanian Hamaggid database for 1872.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

Alien cards on movinghere.org.uk #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

I think I've found the secret for finding alien cards for family members on
movinghere

Enter the family name in the search function; don't bother with asking for
"alien."

I found all those I located a few years ago--plus a few more.

Michael Bernet, New York http://www.mem-ber.net/
-------------------------------------
==Michael Bernet's book, "The Time of the Burning Sun: Six Days of War,
Twelve Weeks of Hope," an update of his earlier book on the Six-Day War of 1967
(published in 1968), is now available. It is an eyewitness account of how the war
affected Jews and Arabs in all walks of life, and corrects some frequently
presented errors: the Israelis did not lodge a war of conquest, they were
planning to relinquish the Arab areas they had unexpectedly won; the Arabs were
relieved to see the end of the harsh occupation of their lands by Egypt and
Jordan. A peace of prosperity and coexistence was eagerly anticipated by those on
either side of the divide until, twelve weeks later, that hope was dashed by a
conference of Arab states meeting in Khartoum.

=="The Longest Six Days: The Psychology of War and Peace in the Middle East,"
Dr. Bernet's latest book, explores the long and brutal Israel-Arab conflict,
from a psychological perspective, and utilizes social psychology to suggest a
possible and equitable solution for this conflict and for the larger issues of
Islamist hostility and terror aimed at more liberal faiths and countries. The
demise of Yasir Arafat has muddied the waters and calls for substantial
rewriting. It is hoped that the book can be published in February, 2005.

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Alien cards on movinghere.org.uk #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

I think I've found the secret for finding alien cards for family members on
movinghere

Enter the family name in the search function; don't bother with asking for
"alien."

I found all those I located a few years ago--plus a few more.

Michael Bernet, New York http://www.mem-ber.net/
-------------------------------------
==Michael Bernet's book, "The Time of the Burning Sun: Six Days of War,
Twelve Weeks of Hope," an update of his earlier book on the Six-Day War of 1967
(published in 1968), is now available. It is an eyewitness account of how the war
affected Jews and Arabs in all walks of life, and corrects some frequently
presented errors: the Israelis did not lodge a war of conquest, they were
planning to relinquish the Arab areas they had unexpectedly won; the Arabs were
relieved to see the end of the harsh occupation of their lands by Egypt and
Jordan. A peace of prosperity and coexistence was eagerly anticipated by those on
either side of the divide until, twelve weeks later, that hope was dashed by a
conference of Arab states meeting in Khartoum.

=="The Longest Six Days: The Psychology of War and Peace in the Middle East,"
Dr. Bernet's latest book, explores the long and brutal Israel-Arab conflict,
from a psychological perspective, and utilizes social psychology to suggest a
possible and equitable solution for this conflict and for the larger issues of
Islamist hostility and terror aimed at more liberal faiths and countries. The
demise of Yasir Arafat has muddied the waters and calls for substantial
rewriting. It is hoped that the book can be published in February, 2005.

* The "meaning" of colors (was Black aprons) #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

I have been following the discussion of the use of black aprons by
mourning Jewish ladies in Britain. A member of this group suggested
that the use of black color by mourners is a Christian custom. Not so.

The use of black symbolizing death originates >from the Egyptians and
later >from the Romans, who indeed wear black shrouds when mourning.
The Christians took over the Romans custom. With the time it spread
into the Americas and Europe.

Black, which in the western culture usually evokes "bad" feelings
(black is dirty, somber, related to death, rebellion, etc.), among
Egyptians was also the color of something magical. For the Egyptians,
black cats carried divine powers. These pets are depicted in many
pharaohs tombs, seemingly for that reason (to protect the deceased
from evil spirits).
In the eastern cultures the color for death is white and in Thailand
the widow wears purple robes.

Thus, the "meaning" of colors changes with cultures and among
civilizations. For those interested in this interesting subject, here
are three links:

http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0769383.html
http://www.wired4success.com/colorsymbolism.htm
http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/color/a/symbolism.htm
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion has drifted away >from its
original genealogical connection. Further responses without
a clear direct connection to genealogy should be sent privately.

Re: Death cert for a stillborn #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I'm curious as to how you located an unmarked grave of a child who may not
have been given a name before he died. If it's unmarked, how do you know
whose grave it is?

That aside, when you say you have checked the archives, I assume you mean
the indexes. Did you check the separate indexes of stillborns?

Not all deaths make it into the indexes. Both my ggf and ggm were not listed
in the indexes; I checked every index listing that began with "S" >from 1910
(last census that included them) until 1919 (They were not in 1920). Neither
was in the index, but I found them by calling cemeteries and obtained the
DC's by looking at films of actual certificates issued around the time of
their respective deaths, obtained >from the stones.

Suggest you interpolate to find the films that would have deaths around
Sept, 1918, and then go thru the certificates until you find the one you
want. They couldn't be buried without a certificate.

Sam

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lisa Dashman" <ldashman@...>

Dear Genners,
I have located the unmarked grave of the stillborn child of my gf and his
first wife, but have had no success locating the child's death
certificate.
The event occurred in Sept. 1918 in New York City, possibly in the
(Bronx)Lebanon Hospital. (The wife died there two days later.) I have
checked the NYC Municipal Archives and various databases, using variants
of the last name, and realizing that there probably would be no first name.
I've also checked with the cemetery for possible information.

Does anyone have experience with this predicament -- and a strategy to
resolve it? Thanks in advance for any help.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen * The "meaning" of colors (was Black aprons) #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

I have been following the discussion of the use of black aprons by
mourning Jewish ladies in Britain. A member of this group suggested
that the use of black color by mourners is a Christian custom. Not so.

The use of black symbolizing death originates >from the Egyptians and
later >from the Romans, who indeed wear black shrouds when mourning.
The Christians took over the Romans custom. With the time it spread
into the Americas and Europe.

Black, which in the western culture usually evokes "bad" feelings
(black is dirty, somber, related to death, rebellion, etc.), among
Egyptians was also the color of something magical. For the Egyptians,
black cats carried divine powers. These pets are depicted in many
pharaohs tombs, seemingly for that reason (to protect the deceased
from evil spirits).
In the eastern cultures the color for death is white and in Thailand
the widow wears purple robes.

Thus, the "meaning" of colors changes with cultures and among
civilizations. For those interested in this interesting subject, here
are three links:

http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0769383.html
http://www.wired4success.com/colorsymbolism.htm
http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/color/a/symbolism.htm
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion has drifted away >from its
original genealogical connection. Further responses without
a clear direct connection to genealogy should be sent privately.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Death cert for a stillborn #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I'm curious as to how you located an unmarked grave of a child who may not
have been given a name before he died. If it's unmarked, how do you know
whose grave it is?

That aside, when you say you have checked the archives, I assume you mean
the indexes. Did you check the separate indexes of stillborns?

Not all deaths make it into the indexes. Both my ggf and ggm were not listed
in the indexes; I checked every index listing that began with "S" >from 1910
(last census that included them) until 1919 (They were not in 1920). Neither
was in the index, but I found them by calling cemeteries and obtained the
DC's by looking at films of actual certificates issued around the time of
their respective deaths, obtained >from the stones.

Suggest you interpolate to find the films that would have deaths around
Sept, 1918, and then go thru the certificates until you find the one you
want. They couldn't be buried without a certificate.

Sam

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lisa Dashman" <ldashman@...>

Dear Genners,
I have located the unmarked grave of the stillborn child of my gf and his
first wife, but have had no success locating the child's death
certificate.
The event occurred in Sept. 1918 in New York City, possibly in the
(Bronx)Lebanon Hospital. (The wife died there two days later.) I have
checked the NYC Municipal Archives and various databases, using variants
of the last name, and realizing that there probably would be no first name.
I've also checked with the cemetery for possible information.

Does anyone have experience with this predicament -- and a strategy to
resolve it? Thanks in advance for any help.

Re: Polish Origin #poland

garymaher@...
 

It would be unusual, but not unheard of, for an exact town name to appear
as a place of birth in the 1880 US Census. The enumerators were
instructed thusly:

PLACE OF BIRTH
In column numbered 24 is to be reported the "Place of birth" of every
person named upon the schedule. If born within the United States the
State or Territory will be named, whether it be the State or Territory in
which the person is at present residing or not. If of foreign birth, the
country will be named as specifically as possible. Instead of writing
"Great Britain" as the place of birth, give the particular country, as
England, Scotland, Wales. Instead of "Germany" specify the State, as
Prussia, Baden, Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Hesse-Darmstadt, etc.

OK, I see your family in Baltimore. Samuel and Sarah Goldman, plus
family.

Ancestry has it transcribed as Litto, but they are the only ones in the
US that have such a birthplace. Looks like it might be Litts. Maybe
Lithuania? Although there is only one person listed with Lithuania as
the place of birth. Litho and Liths are also possible transcriptions. I
can't come up with another country that's even close. And this
particular enumerator is fairly consistent in using periods to indicate
abbreviations. So perhaps it is a city or region.

Good luck!

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 00:00:57 -0600 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@...> writes:
I am researching my ancestors, GOLDMAN & MIT(T)NICK, both >from Poland.

The fact they are >from Poland is cited in the 1870 US Census.

In the 1880 US Census, they (and their parents) are listed with a
birthplace
of "LITTO".

Can someone please advise where this city/village/town may be
located?

JRI Poland #Poland Re: Polish Origin #poland

garymaher@...
 

It would be unusual, but not unheard of, for an exact town name to appear
as a place of birth in the 1880 US Census. The enumerators were
instructed thusly:

PLACE OF BIRTH
In column numbered 24 is to be reported the "Place of birth" of every
person named upon the schedule. If born within the United States the
State or Territory will be named, whether it be the State or Territory in
which the person is at present residing or not. If of foreign birth, the
country will be named as specifically as possible. Instead of writing
"Great Britain" as the place of birth, give the particular country, as
England, Scotland, Wales. Instead of "Germany" specify the State, as
Prussia, Baden, Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Hesse-Darmstadt, etc.

OK, I see your family in Baltimore. Samuel and Sarah Goldman, plus
family.

Ancestry has it transcribed as Litto, but they are the only ones in the
US that have such a birthplace. Looks like it might be Litts. Maybe
Lithuania? Although there is only one person listed with Lithuania as
the place of birth. Litho and Liths are also possible transcriptions. I
can't come up with another country that's even close. And this
particular enumerator is fairly consistent in using periods to indicate
abbreviations. So perhaps it is a city or region.

Good luck!

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 00:00:57 -0600 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@...> writes:
I am researching my ancestors, GOLDMAN & MIT(T)NICK, both >from Poland.

The fact they are >from Poland is cited in the 1870 US Census.

In the 1880 US Census, they (and their parents) are listed with a
birthplace
of "LITTO".

Can someone please advise where this city/village/town may be
located?

Re: Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat - Success #lithuania

meir yohanah
 

Dear Members,

Thanks to all those who replied. The general
consensus was that this town was Kibart Lithuania
which did have a school in Eydtkuhnen across the
border in the German ruled Prussia. And now from
reading about it, all the rest of my families notes
relating to there stay at this location all match
to every detail. Thank you everyone for your replies.
The notes were originally given in broken English and
Yiddish so it would have been easy to write down Kubat
for Kibart. And in one place Godonya for Kedainiai.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat - Success #lithuania

meir yohanah
 

Dear Members,

Thanks to all those who replied. The general
consensus was that this town was Kibart Lithuania
which did have a school in Eydtkuhnen across the
border in the German ruled Prussia. And now from
reading about it, all the rest of my families notes
relating to there stay at this location all match
to every detail. Thank you everyone for your replies.
The notes were originally given in broken English and
Yiddish so it would have been easy to write down Kubat
for Kibart. And in one place Godonya for Kedainiai.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat #lithuania

Howard Margol <homargol@...>
 

<<In my families notes >from Lithuania it says that at
some point they moved >from their farm to a location
near the German Border. It says they crossed a border
bridge (every day) with guards on both sides to attend
a school in Germany. they thought the name
of the town on the German side was Kubat. I am not
sure where the German border was in relation to these
parts of Lithuania between 1882-1902. I didn't think
it touched Lithuania at all. Meir Yohanah>>

During the period referred to, the coastal area with
the Western border of Lithuania was East Prussia.
The town may have been KIBART (KYBARTAI).

"Lithuanian Jewish Communities" by Schoenberg indicates that
Kibart is opposite the German town of Eidkonin (Evdtkuhen),
on the Laipona River, which was the border. In its time
it served as a well-known border station between Russia
and Germany, and later between Lithuania and Germany.

Evidently, Kubat was probably Kibart, in Russia and Eidkonin
was the German town on the other side of the Laipona River.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
homargol@...

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat #lithuania

Howard Margol <homargol@...>
 

<<In my families notes >from Lithuania it says that at
some point they moved >from their farm to a location
near the German Border. It says they crossed a border
bridge (every day) with guards on both sides to attend
a school in Germany. they thought the name
of the town on the German side was Kubat. I am not
sure where the German border was in relation to these
parts of Lithuania between 1882-1902. I didn't think
it touched Lithuania at all. Meir Yohanah>>

During the period referred to, the coastal area with
the Western border of Lithuania was East Prussia.
The town may have been KIBART (KYBARTAI).

"Lithuanian Jewish Communities" by Schoenberg indicates that
Kibart is opposite the German town of Eidkonin (Evdtkuhen),
on the Laipona River, which was the border. In its time
it served as a well-known border station between Russia
and Germany, and later between Lithuania and Germany.

Evidently, Kubat was probably Kibart, in Russia and Eidkonin
was the German town on the other side of the Laipona River.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
homargol@...

Bernstein Yelok #lithuania

ben forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi

I've been researching my mums polish family with some success and I'm
hoping I can trace the ancestry of the Lithuanian family too.

My GGM was EDITH BERNSTIEN (b.1895) she came >from Lithuania to Liverpool
in 1912.

Her parents were >from YELOK their names were ELIAHAYA LIEB BERNSTEIN and
SHAINA VINER, she had a younger sister NACHAMA.

I have searched the ALD and all these names appear, but not together or
for what I would assume to be the correct dates. My grandmother and my 2
uncles visited Lithuania a few years ago and were shown the place that
may have been the family home/shop.

I'm hoping that someone might be able to point me in the right direction
toward finding out some more information about this part of my family.

Thanks

Ben Forman

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Bernstein Yelok #lithuania

ben forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi

I've been researching my mums polish family with some success and I'm
hoping I can trace the ancestry of the Lithuanian family too.

My GGM was EDITH BERNSTIEN (b.1895) she came >from Lithuania to Liverpool
in 1912.

Her parents were >from YELOK their names were ELIAHAYA LIEB BERNSTEIN and
SHAINA VINER, she had a younger sister NACHAMA.

I have searched the ALD and all these names appear, but not together or
for what I would assume to be the correct dates. My grandmother and my 2
uncles visited Lithuania a few years ago and were shown the place that
may have been the family home/shop.

I'm hoping that someone might be able to point me in the right direction
toward finding out some more information about this part of my family.

Thanks

Ben Forman