Date   

19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999- Bulletin #17 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Check out the article, Genealogical Resources in New York City -- Abound for
19th Annual Conference. The article, written by Paul Silverstone and Estelle
Guzik, JGS (NY) Executive Council members, appeared in the Winter 1998 issue
of Avotaynu. The article has been reproduced (and updated) for the Conference
web site and can be found at http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the latest updated
list of lectures planned. The Conference will be held at the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square -- accessible to all
archives, libraries and resources for genealogical research. Provide the
Conference information when you make your reservations with the hotel and
airlines in order to receive the special rates for attendees.

Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS If you have any questions, the Conference email address is:
nyc99conf@...
For questions related to New York repositories, email jgsny@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999- Bulletin #17 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Check out the article, Genealogical Resources in New York City -- Abound for
19th Annual Conference. The article, written by Paul Silverstone and Estelle
Guzik, JGS (NY) Executive Council members, appeared in the Winter 1998 issue
of Avotaynu. The article has been reproduced (and updated) for the Conference
web site and can be found at http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the latest updated
list of lectures planned. The Conference will be held at the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square -- accessible to all
archives, libraries and resources for genealogical research. Provide the
Conference information when you make your reservations with the hotel and
airlines in order to receive the special rates for attendees.

Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS If you have any questions, the Conference email address is:
nyc99conf@...
For questions related to New York repositories, email jgsny@...


Re: hats, beards, coats, names! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt wrote:

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@...> wrote:

No, no, a thousand times no! These are names of Latin and Greek origin,
going back to the Roman Empire! Augusta, Valentina and Magdalina are so
utterly unJewish (sound like Eastern orthodox Christians -- but could be
other Christians, too) that I would be very surprised if their owners were
Jews -- unless they were ethnic Jews who had converted to Christianity and
adopted Christian names?
I've actually seen quite a few Jewish "Augusta"s. It was not an
uncommon Jewish name in late-19th and early 20th-century America.
True, no doubt; but the time frame makes an enormous difference, and that
fact is highly relevant when doing stuff like genealogy. Late 19th and
early 20th-century America included quite a number of German-Jewish
immigrants (often fully assimilated to German culture before they came
here) and of course their descendantswould have been named after them. I
believe the name Augusta was quite common in Germany at that time.

But the original inquiry involved Jews who had already emigrated to
England in the mid- 19th century and who had received their names in the
first half of that century, at a time when a name like Augusta would have
been far less common among Jews. (As for Valentina and Magdalena, back in
that time-frame this would have been even less likely than Augusta- which
is not to say it couldn't happen -- Never say never! -- but highly
unlikely.) Oone should always take the historical and geographic context
into consideration when trying to answer this kind of question. The
answer is rarely homogeneous or global, but is likely to be different in
different times and places.

"Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis" as the old saying goes.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: hats, beards, coats, names! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt wrote:

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@...> wrote:

No, no, a thousand times no! These are names of Latin and Greek origin,
going back to the Roman Empire! Augusta, Valentina and Magdalina are so
utterly unJewish (sound like Eastern orthodox Christians -- but could be
other Christians, too) that I would be very surprised if their owners were
Jews -- unless they were ethnic Jews who had converted to Christianity and
adopted Christian names?
I've actually seen quite a few Jewish "Augusta"s. It was not an
uncommon Jewish name in late-19th and early 20th-century America.
True, no doubt; but the time frame makes an enormous difference, and that
fact is highly relevant when doing stuff like genealogy. Late 19th and
early 20th-century America included quite a number of German-Jewish
immigrants (often fully assimilated to German culture before they came
here) and of course their descendantswould have been named after them. I
believe the name Augusta was quite common in Germany at that time.

But the original inquiry involved Jews who had already emigrated to
England in the mid- 19th century and who had received their names in the
first half of that century, at a time when a name like Augusta would have
been far less common among Jews. (As for Valentina and Magdalena, back in
that time-frame this would have been even less likely than Augusta- which
is not to say it couldn't happen -- Never say never! -- but highly
unlikely.) Oone should always take the historical and geographic context
into consideration when trying to answer this kind of question. The
answer is rarely homogeneous or global, but is likely to be different in
different times and places.

"Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis" as the old saying goes.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


Re: Value of a Zloty #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

The value of a zloty......
On our shtetlinks web page...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

We have the wonderful memories of a man who was born in Zmigrod.......what
it was like to grow up in a Galician shtetl......

..I quote some of these memories as I think they answer what a zloty would
be worth about 1935-40....

"........A cutter could make 1 zloty per day (2 kilos of bread was 1/2
zloty, a Kilo sugar was almost a zloty). "



PhyllisKramer, Wilton Conn, Savannah Ga and NYC ......
searching
KRAMER, WISNER >from Jasienica Rosielna, Poland
STECHER/STECKLER, TRACHMAN, FEIR/FEUER, KORNREICH (Zmigrod & Rymanow, Pol)
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL (Strzyzow & Dubiecko, Pol)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN, MAURER, MERL, WEICH (Rogatin & Bolechov, Ukr)
LINDNER, FISCHER, LAZAROWICH (Iasi, Romania)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Value of a Zloty #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

The value of a zloty......
On our shtetlinks web page...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

We have the wonderful memories of a man who was born in Zmigrod.......what
it was like to grow up in a Galician shtetl......

..I quote some of these memories as I think they answer what a zloty would
be worth about 1935-40....

"........A cutter could make 1 zloty per day (2 kilos of bread was 1/2
zloty, a Kilo sugar was almost a zloty). "



PhyllisKramer, Wilton Conn, Savannah Ga and NYC ......
searching
KRAMER, WISNER >from Jasienica Rosielna, Poland
STECHER/STECKLER, TRACHMAN, FEIR/FEUER, KORNREICH (Zmigrod & Rymanow, Pol)
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL (Strzyzow & Dubiecko, Pol)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN, MAURER, MERL, WEICH (Rogatin & Bolechov, Ukr)
LINDNER, FISCHER, LAZAROWICH (Iasi, Romania)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Rabbis in Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

After finally discovering the names of my maternal Grandparents, from
Svarycewicze,[near Pinsk], Belarus. I have been unable to go back any
further. My Mother said that her Grandfather was a Rabbi, but not which
Grandfather ! Her parents' names were : Shaindle MODACK and Isaac DRYZUN.My
question to the group is : Does anyone know of a book , or list of Rabbis
in Belarus, covering the time-period
1850-1920 ?

Evelyn Doberstein
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada

E-mail <edoberst@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: About a month ago, someone posted a message about a book
of Rabbis >from Russia. Check out the SIG message archives. Also check
out <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/deych.htm>, Jewish Religious
Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854. There were two people listed
with the name DREIZIN. This database is linked on the Belarus SIG website
as well as the JewishGen website. Both sites have valuable information
in help researchers and I urge those of you who haven't explored the
various links to those sites to do so at once.


Rabbis in Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

After finally discovering the names of my maternal Grandparents, from
Svarycewicze,[near Pinsk], Belarus. I have been unable to go back any
further. My Mother said that her Grandfather was a Rabbi, but not which
Grandfather ! Her parents' names were : Shaindle MODACK and Isaac DRYZUN.My
question to the group is : Does anyone know of a book , or list of Rabbis
in Belarus, covering the time-period
1850-1920 ?

Evelyn Doberstein
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada

E-mail <edoberst@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: About a month ago, someone posted a message about a book
of Rabbis >from Russia. Check out the SIG message archives. Also check
out <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/deych.htm>, Jewish Religious
Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854. There were two people listed
with the name DREIZIN. This database is linked on the Belarus SIG website
as well as the JewishGen website. Both sites have valuable information
in help researchers and I urge those of you who haven't explored the
various links to those sites to do so at once.


Re: Alternate Surnames #poland

Carol Baker <carolcbaker@...>
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@... writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. My question is this;
should I look at others who have this "second" surname although they don't have the
"other" first surname? For example, my surname is Krein and the second surname
is Okin. Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with
the surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn?

Dear Maria,

I think you misunderstood the significance of Surname2 in the Vegeriai 1858
Revision List (a field not original to the document but added by the inputters
in an attempt to make searching easier.) It simply means that a family by the
name of OKIN was living with a family by the name of KREYN when the census
taker came by in 1858. They may or may not have been related.

In the same town, my GREENBLATT family is listed with the FAYN family at #44,
but in this case the record clearly states that Wolf FAYN is the brother of
Erukhim GREENBLATT (Grinblatt).

When the 1858 Revision List is added to the ALD, the "Surname2" field name
will be changed to read "Other Families in the Household"

Hope this helps.

Carol Baker
Siauliai District Coordinator

LIPSCHITZ, WEGER - Vegeriai and Siauliai, Lithuania & Johannesburg
GREENBLATT - Vegeriai, Lithuania
TUORREA/TVERIA - Gargzdai, Lithuania


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Alternate Surnames #lithuania

Carol Baker <carolcbaker@...>
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@... writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. My question is this;
should I look at others who have this "second" surname although they don't have the
"other" first surname? For example, my surname is Krein and the second surname
is Okin. Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with
the surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn?

Dear Maria,

I think you misunderstood the significance of Surname2 in the Vegeriai 1858
Revision List (a field not original to the document but added by the inputters
in an attempt to make searching easier.) It simply means that a family by the
name of OKIN was living with a family by the name of KREYN when the census
taker came by in 1858. They may or may not have been related.

In the same town, my GREENBLATT family is listed with the FAYN family at #44,
but in this case the record clearly states that Wolf FAYN is the brother of
Erukhim GREENBLATT (Grinblatt).

When the 1858 Revision List is added to the ALD, the "Surname2" field name
will be changed to read "Other Families in the Household"

Hope this helps.

Carol Baker
Siauliai District Coordinator

LIPSCHITZ, WEGER - Vegeriai and Siauliai, Lithuania & Johannesburg
GREENBLATT - Vegeriai, Lithuania
TUORREA/TVERIA - Gargzdai, Lithuania


The Czar's army #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

How would you assess the likelihood that a 26-year-old would be drafted
in 1903, especially if he came >from a larger town or city (supposedly
Minsk)? Let's assume that he was single (which is odd). What was the age
cohort that was drafted? Would his single status have stacked the deck
against him?
I know you said not to speculate, but this may be highly relevant so I
can't help wondering:

Is it possible that Russia's far eastern foreign policy (namely, the
eastward expansion that led to the Russo-Japanese war in 1904) had induced
the Czar to step up the draft by enlarging the age parameters and taking
married men? That is quite normal in times of "cold war."

My own grandfather, having first left Russia for Poland, left Poland for
England with his young family in 1902 at the age of 28, and we were given
to understand that avoiding the army was at least an element in the
situation. But, as you say, this may be just a bobbe-mayse (or in this
case, shall we say, a zayde-mayse)?

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Czar's army #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

How would you assess the likelihood that a 26-year-old would be drafted
in 1903, especially if he came >from a larger town or city (supposedly
Minsk)? Let's assume that he was single (which is odd). What was the age
cohort that was drafted? Would his single status have stacked the deck
against him?
I know you said not to speculate, but this may be highly relevant so I
can't help wondering:

Is it possible that Russia's far eastern foreign policy (namely, the
eastward expansion that led to the Russo-Japanese war in 1904) had induced
the Czar to step up the draft by enlarging the age parameters and taking
married men? That is quite normal in times of "cold war."

My own grandfather, having first left Russia for Poland, left Poland for
England with his young family in 1902 at the age of 28, and we were given
to understand that avoiding the army was at least an element in the
situation. But, as you say, this may be just a bobbe-mayse (or in this
case, shall we say, a zayde-mayse)?

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Jews and the draft #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Someone wrote:

Something else for you historians/sociologists to ponder. Sixty-odd
years later, many grandsons of these draft dodgers were also doing
everything to escape military service in a idiotic war. And it was
probably a higher percentage of Jews who did not want to serve. Too bad
we were too ashamed of being Jews to explain to the public that we had
been here before.
IMHO (or not-so-H-0?) that is _not_ likely to have been the reason. Draft
dodging in general (like army enlistment in general) , and Vietnam in
particular, is primarily a class phenomenon. Most Jews by that time were
middle or upper-middle class, and that class for excellent reasons did not
want to serve in that war.

I'm betting that non-Jewish Americans in the same class evaded the draft to
pretty much the same extent (ever heard of Bill Clinton?) But it is
certainly true that the percentage of Jews in the middle class by the 1960s
was a lot higher than the percentage of middle-class Americans in general.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews and the draft #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Someone wrote:

Something else for you historians/sociologists to ponder. Sixty-odd
years later, many grandsons of these draft dodgers were also doing
everything to escape military service in a idiotic war. And it was
probably a higher percentage of Jews who did not want to serve. Too bad
we were too ashamed of being Jews to explain to the public that we had
been here before.
IMHO (or not-so-H-0?) that is _not_ likely to have been the reason. Draft
dodging in general (like army enlistment in general) , and Vietnam in
particular, is primarily a class phenomenon. Most Jews by that time were
middle or upper-middle class, and that class for excellent reasons did not
want to serve in that war.

I'm betting that non-Jewish Americans in the same class evaded the draft to
pretty much the same extent (ever heard of Bill Clinton?) But it is
certainly true that the percentage of Jews in the middle class by the 1960s
was a lot higher than the percentage of middle-class Americans in general.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


Re: Alternate Surnames #poland

DBH12345@...
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@... writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. I realize that the
Jews went through a period of "trying on" names and they shifted back and
forth, and so on. My question is this; should I look at others who have this
"second" surname although they don't have the "other" first surname? For
example, my surname is Krein and the second surname is Okin. Should I
seriously consider looking at others in the same town with the surname Okin,
even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn? I'm trying
different sorting techniques with these surnames and looking at the fathers'
names for clues too. Thanks for any suggestions.
Regards,
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Fl. >>

Dear Marcia,

In my own research I found a number of cases where the father or grandfather
had double surnames (some hyphenated, some not), and some of their son's took
one name and not the other. I can't help think about how so many women today
choose the admirable practice of using their full names (and not relegate them
to "middle" name status.

I would definitely include in my search those who didn't have both of the
surnames.

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LItvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Alternate Surnames #lithuania

DBH12345@...
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@... writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. I realize that the
Jews went through a period of "trying on" names and they shifted back and
forth, and so on. My question is this; should I look at others who have this
"second" surname although they don't have the "other" first surname? For
example, my surname is Krein and the second surname is Okin. Should I
seriously consider looking at others in the same town with the surname Okin,
even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn? I'm trying
different sorting techniques with these surnames and looking at the fathers'
names for clues too. Thanks for any suggestions.
Regards,
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Fl. >>

Dear Marcia,

In my own research I found a number of cases where the father or grandfather
had double surnames (some hyphenated, some not), and some of their son's took
one name and not the other. I can't help think about how so many women today
choose the admirable practice of using their full names (and not relegate them
to "middle" name status.

I would definitely include in my search those who didn't have both of the
surnames.

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LItvakSIG


Re: Polish Zloty #general

Lweissberg@...
 

re: value of a zloty
I was just in Poland for my 5th time. In 1989 (still under USSR) the
zloty was valued at $1= 10,000Zl. in February of 1999 after independence
of 10 years and economic stabilization the zloty has a value of $1=3.4zl
the same as the new shekel....
Leon Weissberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Polish Zloty #general

Lweissberg@...
 

re: value of a zloty
I was just in Poland for my 5th time. In 1989 (still under USSR) the
zloty was valued at $1= 10,000Zl. in February of 1999 after independence
of 10 years and economic stabilization the zloty has a value of $1=3.4zl
the same as the new shekel....
Leon Weissberg


Jews of Merthyr Tydfil #general

Robert W Fraser <fraser@...>
 

Would Wendy Bellamy, who wrote the article on the Jews of Merthyr Tydfil
in "Shemot", please contact me by private email.
Thank you.

Robert W Fraser
Perth, Western Australia
fraser@...


Litvak story on radio #lithuania

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

Last night the public radio station in Chicago broadcast a program of
Jewish Stories II produced by KCRW in Santa Monica. One of the stories
was an excerpt >from Max Apple's "I Love Gootie". The story was about
Apple's family in Serai, Lithuania. To my surprise it ended with a very
moving description of the family being kicked out of their shtetl during
WWI, and their trouble when they returned to Serai after the war. This
is a subject which I brought up on these pages.

The other story on the program was "Hodel" by Shalom Aleichem superbly
acted out by Richard Dreyfus. Try to listen to these programs, they are
very educational as well as fine art.

Steven Weiss
Chicago