Date   

Re: Match Question on Ancestry #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

<Can anyone explain to me how there could be shared
matches with people on two unrelated sides of my family?>
That occurs frequently, especially with Ancestry, because Ancestry
does not tell us the length of the longest matching string. If we knew
that length, we could eliminate many matches that are either just
noise or so far back in history that we can neither confirm or deny
their veracity. I think their theory is that they do not need to show
that information because they only show matching strips of at least 6
cMs in length, but there is a big difference between 6 cMs and the
20-30 cMs that experts suggest is significant.
Most double-sided matches result >from endogamy, the fact that
Ashkenazi Jews tended to intermarry. The marriage may have been pretty
far back in the chain, but it may nonetheless show up as a match.
My response to this is the safety-in-numbers gambit. Assume that I
have 4 cousins on my father's side and 4 cousins on my mother's side
who have tested. If the match is with only one cousin on one side, I
tend to disregard it. If the match is with 3 or 4 cousins on both
sides, one can be pretty sure that the two lines intermarried, though
not necessarily within the time when we can prove it by finding the
records.
It seems to me that some of my cousins are very "matchable", while
others are not. I have no idea whether certain dna combinations are
more common at particular sites along the genome than others, which
would result in people who have those common combinations match more
frequently than those who lack them.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


DNA Research #DNA Re: Match Question on Ancestry #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

<Can anyone explain to me how there could be shared
matches with people on two unrelated sides of my family?>
That occurs frequently, especially with Ancestry, because Ancestry
does not tell us the length of the longest matching string. If we knew
that length, we could eliminate many matches that are either just
noise or so far back in history that we can neither confirm or deny
their veracity. I think their theory is that they do not need to show
that information because they only show matching strips of at least 6
cMs in length, but there is a big difference between 6 cMs and the
20-30 cMs that experts suggest is significant.
Most double-sided matches result >from endogamy, the fact that
Ashkenazi Jews tended to intermarry. The marriage may have been pretty
far back in the chain, but it may nonetheless show up as a match.
My response to this is the safety-in-numbers gambit. Assume that I
have 4 cousins on my father's side and 4 cousins on my mother's side
who have tested. If the match is with only one cousin on one side, I
tend to disregard it. If the match is with 3 or 4 cousins on both
sides, one can be pretty sure that the two lines intermarried, though
not necessarily within the time when we can prove it by finding the
records.
It seems to me that some of my cousins are very "matchable", while
others are not. I have no idea whether certain dna combinations are
more common at particular sites along the genome than others, which
would result in people who have those common combinations match more
frequently than those who lack them.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


Re: FT DNA - volume and threshold of matches #dna

David Ellis
 

Steve Stein writes:

Is there any way to either let FTDNA know that I am not interested
in lower level matches, or to have the match display default to a filter?

This is a known issue with FTDNA. Unlike the other DNA services, which by
default exclude segments less than 7 cM >from their totals, FTDNA appears to
have no option to adjust the totals downward to mitigate the effects of
Ashkenazi Jewish endogamy. One thing you can do is view promising matches
in the Chromosome Browser, which does allow you to choose a minimum segment
size of 1, 5, 7 or 10 cM to display.

I have been using a modified version of Lara Diamond's criterion for looking
further into DNA matches. She recommends a total of at least 100 cM with
longest segment at least 20 cM. I add one more criterion, a second segment
at least 10 cM. This excludes matches with one long segment and only
background noise, which I have found to be tantalizingly out of my
genealogical reach. No rule of thumb is foolproof; you can't avoid false
positives and false negatives.

The most important piece of guidance is to get as solid a paper trail as you
can before assessing your DNA matches. When reviewing a promising match,
look for the holes in your paper trail. My most promising unidentified
match seems to be a third cousin once removed. I've found siblings of all
eight of my great-grandparents and nine of my sixteen great-greats; this
match appears to be a great-grandchild of a sibling of one of seven of my
great-greats that I haven't identified. Quite an interesting brick wall.

Let me close with a success story. After eight years of fruitlessly
pursuing hundreds of promising DNA matches and failing to connect our family
trees, Ancestry DNA connected me with a previously unknown third cousin from
a family branch that I thought had all died in the Holocaust. I never found
her grandfather's birth record in Galicia, but I did find births of three
sisters in the JRI-Poland database, with subsequent listings in the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum's list of persecuted people. Her grandfather
survived a concentration camp and came to the US, believing he was the only
survivor. He didn't know he had an aunt who had left Galicia for the US in
1904, nine years before his birth. He was living in New York, less than a
mile away >from his first cousin, my grandmother, and the two of them never
knew of the existence of each other. Fifty years later, his granddaughter
found me because she noticed her great-grandfather and her grandfather's
sisters in my family tree.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


DNA Research #DNA RE: FT DNA - volume and threshold of matches #dna

David Ellis
 

Steve Stein writes:

Is there any way to either let FTDNA know that I am not interested
in lower level matches, or to have the match display default to a filter?

This is a known issue with FTDNA. Unlike the other DNA services, which by
default exclude segments less than 7 cM >from their totals, FTDNA appears to
have no option to adjust the totals downward to mitigate the effects of
Ashkenazi Jewish endogamy. One thing you can do is view promising matches
in the Chromosome Browser, which does allow you to choose a minimum segment
size of 1, 5, 7 or 10 cM to display.

I have been using a modified version of Lara Diamond's criterion for looking
further into DNA matches. She recommends a total of at least 100 cM with
longest segment at least 20 cM. I add one more criterion, a second segment
at least 10 cM. This excludes matches with one long segment and only
background noise, which I have found to be tantalizingly out of my
genealogical reach. No rule of thumb is foolproof; you can't avoid false
positives and false negatives.

The most important piece of guidance is to get as solid a paper trail as you
can before assessing your DNA matches. When reviewing a promising match,
look for the holes in your paper trail. My most promising unidentified
match seems to be a third cousin once removed. I've found siblings of all
eight of my great-grandparents and nine of my sixteen great-greats; this
match appears to be a great-grandchild of a sibling of one of seven of my
great-greats that I haven't identified. Quite an interesting brick wall.

Let me close with a success story. After eight years of fruitlessly
pursuing hundreds of promising DNA matches and failing to connect our family
trees, Ancestry DNA connected me with a previously unknown third cousin from
a family branch that I thought had all died in the Holocaust. I never found
her grandfather's birth record in Galicia, but I did find births of three
sisters in the JRI-Poland database, with subsequent listings in the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum's list of persecuted people. Her grandfather
survived a concentration camp and came to the US, believing he was the only
survivor. He didn't know he had an aunt who had left Galicia for the US in
1904, nine years before his birth. He was living in New York, less than a
mile away >from his first cousin, my grandmother, and the two of them never
knew of the existence of each other. Fifty years later, his granddaughter
found me because she noticed her great-grandfather and her grandfather's
sisters in my family tree.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


Re: Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

< I have come across a tombstone where the name of the deceased is
"Menachem Mendal". The entry in the local histories calls the person
"Mendal". Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.>
Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names
(Avotaynu 2001) reports that Menakhem was a king of Israel referenced
at 2 Kings 15:14. It means "comforter". It was often because of its
meaning given to males born in the month of Ab, a month in which
according to tradition all manner of bad things happened to the Jewish
people, including the destruction of the Temple.
Menakhem is often coupled in double names with the name Man and its
derivatives. In Yiddish, the addition of -l or -k to the end of a name
creates a fond diminuitive, so Mandel or Mendal is a derivative of
Man.
In eastern Europe, persons with double given names are sometimes
referred to in the records with both names, and sometimes only with
the first. Less frequently, they may be referred to by only the second
of the double names.
To my American ears, Menakhem sounds foreign, while Mendel sounds
plausibly American. It may be that this person used Mendel in order
to sound less foreign.
If the dates match, I think this is the same person, especially if
there are not others in the geographic vicinity with similar names.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meaning of name Menachem Mendel #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

< I have come across a tombstone where the name of the deceased is
"Menachem Mendal". The entry in the local histories calls the person
"Mendal". Question: Is this the same person? The dates match.>
Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names
(Avotaynu 2001) reports that Menakhem was a king of Israel referenced
at 2 Kings 15:14. It means "comforter". It was often because of its
meaning given to males born in the month of Ab, a month in which
according to tradition all manner of bad things happened to the Jewish
people, including the destruction of the Temple.
Menakhem is often coupled in double names with the name Man and its
derivatives. In Yiddish, the addition of -l or -k to the end of a name
creates a fond diminuitive, so Mandel or Mendal is a derivative of
Man.
In eastern Europe, persons with double given names are sometimes
referred to in the records with both names, and sometimes only with
the first. Less frequently, they may be referred to by only the second
of the double names.
To my American ears, Menakhem sounds foreign, while Mendel sounds
plausibly American. It may be that this person used Mendel in order
to sound less foreign.
If the dates match, I think this is the same person, especially if
there are not others in the geographic vicinity with similar names.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


Seeking Donations for Novohrad-Volyns'kyy Area Yizkor Book #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

A new translation fund has been setup through JewishGen to translate the
Yiddish portions of a Yizkor Book for the Novohrad-Volyns'kyy a.k.a. Zvhil
area ( 50 36 / 27 37 ) in Ukraine. The fundraising goal is $18,000. To
donate, please visit
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and scroll down to "Novohrad-Volyns'kyy, Ukraine - Yizkor Book"
Enter any amount. Donations of every size are welcome.

**NOTE: The contents of this book include a broad geographic area that was
partially known as Volhynia Guberniya during the Russian Empire, and there
are few other Yizkor Memorial Books for the area.

In addition to the city of Novograd-Volynsk, nearby towns listed in the
Table of Contents < https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zvhil/zvhil.html > are
Slavuta, Baronovka, Rohachiv, Polona/Polonnoye, Pulin, Horodnytsya, and
Kamennyy Brod.

Other towns geographically nearby that might be included in the translated
text could be Barashi, Berezdiv, Dovbysh, Emilchino, Dubrivka, Kolodianka,
Korets, Koryst, Krasnostav, Lyubar, Miropol, Nova Chartoriya, Poninka,
Romanov, Serednya, Sokolov, Stepanovka, Ternivka, and Yarun.

Please circulate this fundraising effort to interested friends, relatives,
academics, congregations, or your local Jewish Genealogy Society.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Project Leader
Personally researching SHINDELMAN, KARGER, LEDERMAN, GURALNICK, GENICK,
KAPER, TEPPER, and BERMAN in Lyubar, Polonnoye, Chudnov, Ostropol,
Berdichev, and Novograd-Volynsk area.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Donations for Novohrad-Volyns'kyy Area Yizkor Book #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

A new translation fund has been setup through JewishGen to translate the
Yiddish portions of a Yizkor Book for the Novohrad-Volyns'kyy a.k.a. Zvhil
area ( 50 36 / 27 37 ) in Ukraine. The fundraising goal is $18,000. To
donate, please visit
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and scroll down to "Novohrad-Volyns'kyy, Ukraine - Yizkor Book"
Enter any amount. Donations of every size are welcome.

**NOTE: The contents of this book include a broad geographic area that was
partially known as Volhynia Guberniya during the Russian Empire, and there
are few other Yizkor Memorial Books for the area.

In addition to the city of Novograd-Volynsk, nearby towns listed in the
Table of Contents < https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zvhil/zvhil.html > are
Slavuta, Baronovka, Rohachiv, Polona/Polonnoye, Pulin, Horodnytsya, and
Kamennyy Brod.

Other towns geographically nearby that might be included in the translated
text could be Barashi, Berezdiv, Dovbysh, Emilchino, Dubrivka, Kolodianka,
Korets, Koryst, Krasnostav, Lyubar, Miropol, Nova Chartoriya, Poninka,
Romanov, Serednya, Sokolov, Stepanovka, Ternivka, and Yarun.

Please circulate this fundraising effort to interested friends, relatives,
academics, congregations, or your local Jewish Genealogy Society.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Project Leader
Personally researching SHINDELMAN, KARGER, LEDERMAN, GURALNICK, GENICK,
KAPER, TEPPER, and BERMAN in Lyubar, Polonnoye, Chudnov, Ostropol,
Berdichev, and Novograd-Volynsk area.


Offering Photos / Research at Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth , New York #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Spring has arrived and time for the genealogists in the north to head
to the cemeteries again!

First up for me is going to be Mount Zion in Maspeth Queens, New York.

I am happy to look for graves and take photos provided you can ID the
appropriate person. Mount Zion has a database where you can start with
your research but be aware while the year is always correct, their
database defaults to the first day of the month when a date is not
specified or the first day of the year when a month is not specified.
So if they did not have complete data when they were entering the person
into the database you might see the date as the first or it as January 1
when your research says a different date >from the death certificate or
such. Also a lot of times the date differs >from the death certificate
because the database mostly has date of burial not date of death.

I am pretty good at finding my way around in Mount Zion but some spots
can allude even the best searcher. But still I try. Infants, babies
and children are the most difficult because a lot of times they did not
have as significant stones and they do not survive the years. Some
areas of Zion also unfortunately do not have maps.

Please be specific in your requests because I can not help you if you
write with a common name and say can you find for example Harry Cohen
.... you can guess how many there are in this cemetery. Mount Zion
Cemetery has more than 210,000 burials on its 78 acres.

I do appreciate but do not demand a few dollars in return to help off
set the cost of doing these search for everyone and to make it possible
for me to continue to offer this as a service to the community. As you
can understand the costs of these repeated searches add up on me.

I am also happy to offer advice online if you email me. As I said I
have been through Mount Zion enough to know what's possible and also
some tricks on how to locate people in the database.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Offering Photos / Research at Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth , New York #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Spring has arrived and time for the genealogists in the north to head
to the cemeteries again!

First up for me is going to be Mount Zion in Maspeth Queens, New York.

I am happy to look for graves and take photos provided you can ID the
appropriate person. Mount Zion has a database where you can start with
your research but be aware while the year is always correct, their
database defaults to the first day of the month when a date is not
specified or the first day of the year when a month is not specified.
So if they did not have complete data when they were entering the person
into the database you might see the date as the first or it as January 1
when your research says a different date >from the death certificate or
such. Also a lot of times the date differs >from the death certificate
because the database mostly has date of burial not date of death.

I am pretty good at finding my way around in Mount Zion but some spots
can allude even the best searcher. But still I try. Infants, babies
and children are the most difficult because a lot of times they did not
have as significant stones and they do not survive the years. Some
areas of Zion also unfortunately do not have maps.

Please be specific in your requests because I can not help you if you
write with a common name and say can you find for example Harry Cohen
.... you can guess how many there are in this cemetery. Mount Zion
Cemetery has more than 210,000 burials on its 78 acres.

I do appreciate but do not demand a few dollars in return to help off
set the cost of doing these search for everyone and to make it possible
for me to continue to offer this as a service to the community. As you
can understand the costs of these repeated searches add up on me.

I am also happy to offer advice online if you email me. As I said I
have been through Mount Zion enough to know what's possible and also
some tricks on how to locate people in the database.

Allan Jordan


Searching GOLDSTEIN, Poltova-->Brooklyn #general

Deanna Levinsky <deannasmac@...>
 

Dear Readers,
I'm looking to contact the descendents of Robert Goldstein, born in
Poltova, Ukraine about 1872. He probably lived in Brooklyn, New York
and was married at least twice, the second marriage was in June 1920.
His parents were Ida Minskoff and Samuel.
Also searching for Sipie(Siporah/Celia) Lemport Podofsky who married
Samuel Shafarenko in Nezhin, Ukraine around 1870. They never left
Russia. Children Anna, Muriel, Latzie, Sami and others
Thank you,
Deanna Mandel Levinsky
Researching: Shafarenko, Lamport/Lempert, Riffkin/Rifkin, Podofsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching GOLDSTEIN, Poltova-->Brooklyn #general

Deanna Levinsky <deannasmac@...>
 

Dear Readers,
I'm looking to contact the descendents of Robert Goldstein, born in
Poltova, Ukraine about 1872. He probably lived in Brooklyn, New York
and was married at least twice, the second marriage was in June 1920.
His parents were Ida Minskoff and Samuel.
Also searching for Sipie(Siporah/Celia) Lemport Podofsky who married
Samuel Shafarenko in Nezhin, Ukraine around 1870. They never left
Russia. Children Anna, Muriel, Latzie, Sami and others
Thank you,
Deanna Mandel Levinsky
Researching: Shafarenko, Lamport/Lempert, Riffkin/Rifkin, Podofsky


"Stepana", Russia #general

Mirta Scheffer
 

I am trying to find any information related to "Stepana" Russia. It is
listed as a birth place on an Ellis Island Passenger List >from 1923 for
Leyzer Woideslaver.
Thank you in advance,

Mirta Scheffer
Elkins Park, Pa

Researching: Vaideslaver, Dremberg, Furcajg, Furmanski, Averbuj


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Stepana", Russia #general

Mirta Scheffer
 

I am trying to find any information related to "Stepana" Russia. It is
listed as a birth place on an Ellis Island Passenger List >from 1923 for
Leyzer Woideslaver.
Thank you in advance,

Mirta Scheffer
Elkins Park, Pa

Researching: Vaideslaver, Dremberg, Furcajg, Furmanski, Averbuj


How do I obtain 1921 birth certificate Dortmund #germany

Debby Gincig Painter
 

I am trying to find how to obtain the birth certificate for my Uncle,
Herman (Hermann) Klinger born November 11, 1921 in Dortmund, Germany.

Thank you. Debby Painter gincig@...


German SIG #Germany How do I obtain 1921 birth certificate Dortmund #germany

Debby Gincig Painter
 

I am trying to find how to obtain the birth certificate for my Uncle,
Herman (Hermann) Klinger born November 11, 1921 in Dortmund, Germany.

Thank you. Debby Painter gincig@...


Re: Treuchtlingen cemetery, including Berolzheim, Dittenheim, Weimersheim (was SCHOENWALTER) #germany

Reuven Mohr
 

Dear Lin Herz and list,

I have deciphered the burial register of the Treuchtlingen Jewish
cemetery, where also the communities of Berolzheim, Dittenheim,
Ellingen and Weimersheim buried their dead. The register usually gives
grave no., row, date of death. More details, like relationship to
others (father, husband/wife etc.) are available here and there. The
register was compiled around the 1930ies, when many stones in the
older part were already illegible.

There are 26 SCHOENWALTERs buried there. I'm not related.

I can check also other names for those interested.

Reuven Mohr, Israel <reuven.mohr@...>

Lin Herz <lin32905@...> asked:
Can you help with the SCHOENWALTER family?


German SIG #Germany Re: Treuchtlingen cemetery, including Berolzheim, Dittenheim, Weimersheim (was SCHOENWALTER) #germany

Reuven Mohr
 

Dear Lin Herz and list,

I have deciphered the burial register of the Treuchtlingen Jewish
cemetery, where also the communities of Berolzheim, Dittenheim,
Ellingen and Weimersheim buried their dead. The register usually gives
grave no., row, date of death. More details, like relationship to
others (father, husband/wife etc.) are available here and there. The
register was compiled around the 1930ies, when many stones in the
older part were already illegible.

There are 26 SCHOENWALTERs buried there. I'm not related.

I can check also other names for those interested.

Reuven Mohr, Israel <reuven.mohr@...>

Lin Herz <lin32905@...> asked:
Can you help with the SCHOENWALTER family?


New JewishGen Class - Writing Short Reports May 10-May 31 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen will again offer a class in publishing your research. This
class concentrates on writing short reports.

Time to get your data out of the shoebox and arrange it in a summary
report? A quick, short report is great to send to relatives or other
researchers and to remind you just where your last project left off.

In this class we will practice writing 3 styles of reports:
* a list style,
* a lineage style report
* a longer Genealogical Summary Report.

The instructor will offer directions for using your genealogical
software "publishing features," organizing your files and folders,
citing your sources and making decisions about media snips and images.

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to be ready to
write. Students should have access to a genealogical software program
and be comfortable with computers.

Students must have 8-10 hours per week to study the assignments, write
their reports and interact with the instructor. To meet the needs of
international students this course is open 24/7.

Tuition is $150 for this 3 week class and includes editing suggestions
upon request. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Address questions to:
Nancy Holden
JewishGen-Education@...

If you have questions, I will be glad to review your project before you
enroll.

Nancy Holden


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom New JewishGen Class - Writing Short Reports May 10-May 31 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen will again offer a class in publishing your research. This
class concentrates on writing short reports.

Time to get your data out of the shoebox and arrange it in a summary
report? A quick, short report is great to send to relatives or other
researchers and to remind you just where your last project left off.

In this class we will practice writing 3 styles of reports:
* a list style,
* a lineage style report
* a longer Genealogical Summary Report.

The instructor will offer directions for using your genealogical
software "publishing features," organizing your files and folders,
citing your sources and making decisions about media snips and images.

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to be ready to
write. Students should have access to a genealogical software program
and be comfortable with computers.

Students must have 8-10 hours per week to study the assignments, write
their reports and interact with the instructor. To meet the needs of
international students this course is open 24/7.

Tuition is $150 for this 3 week class and includes editing suggestions
upon request. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Address questions to:
Nancy Holden
JewishGen-Education@...

If you have questions, I will be glad to review your project before you
enroll.

Nancy Holden

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