Date   

Yizkor Book Project Monthly Update #general

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

During the month of October the Yizkor Book Project put a record-breaking
12 new translations on our web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>.
We now have exactly 50 Yizkor Book items on-line. A heartfelt "thank you"
to our translation donors and our HTML volunteers, and a special
appreciation to our tireless Translations Manager, Joyce Field.

The following nine items are new since our last Update:

* Berezhany, Ukraine - Translation of chapter >from Brzezany, Narajow
ve-ha-seviva; toldot kehilot she-nehrevu (Brzezany Memorial Book),
contributed by Michael Kreindler.

* Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland - Translation of portions of Sefer kehilat
Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza ve-hurbana (Book of the Jewish community of
Dabrowa Gornicza and its destruction), translated and contributed by Lance
Ackerfeld.

* Grebinki, Ukraine - Translation of Aunt Sophie's Letter, translated and
contributed by Leonard Prager.

* Jedwabne (Yedwabne), Poland - Translation of the Table of Contents and
Necrology >from Sefer Jedwabne; Historiya ve-zikaron (Yedwabne: History and
Memorial Book ), translated and contributed by Morlan Ty Rogers.

* Kozienice, Poland - Lists of martyrs >from The book of Kozienice; The
birth and the destruction of a Jewish community, contributed by Phyllis
Goldberg.

* Piaski [Piesk], Belarus - Translation of Necrology from: Pyesk ve-Most;
sefer yizkor (Piesk (Piaski) and Most, a memorial book), transliterated and
donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Sadgura, Ukraine - Translation of the chapter "Sadgura" >from Volume II of
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukowina),
translated by Thea Waldman, contributed by Nicholas Martin.

* Suchowola, Poland - Translation of Necrology from: Khurbn Sukhovolye;
lezikorn fun a yidish shtetl tsvishn Bialystok un Grodne (The Holocaust in
Suchowola; in memory of a Jewish shtetl between Bialystok and Grodno),
transliterated and donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Zheludok (Zoludek), Belarus - Translation of Table of Contents and
Necrology from: Sefer Zoludek ve-Orlowa; galed le-zikaron (The book of
Zoludek [Zhelodok] and Orlowa; a living memorial), translated by Michael
Bohnen and Ellen Sadove Renck, donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

We would like to welcome two new volunteer HTML coders, both of whom join
us >from Israel: Jerry Esterson and Moshe Shavit. Jerry has created our web
pages listed under Siemiatycze (announced last month), Grebenki, and
Kozienice. Moshe provided the pages for Dabrowa Gornicza and Jedwabne.
They join our veteran HTML coder Mike Kalt and our translations advisor,
Susannah Juni, who has generously helping to get our web pages up-to-date.


Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Re: Missing family graves #general

Stephen Warshall <s_warshall@...>
 

Allan Jordan writes:

Going through the New York City area records I have not
been able to find either death certificate but I strongly believe
they lived/died in New York City.
<snip>
No idea why New York City does not have deather certificates
-- any guesses >from anyone reading this?
I have encountered a number of NYC deaths apparently missing >from the
indexes, and they were almost invariably there, but misfiled. The
blunder seemed to arise >from the difficulty the file clerks had in
reading the handwriting of the doctors.

This poses no real problem if the errors are late in the surname, but
an error in the first letter can be a real nuisance, and misreadings
are not that uncommon with certain script capitals. Thus, for
example, capitals Y, T, I, and J are routinely confused with one
another. When I hunt for a surname beginning with one of those, I
frequently have to search in four places.

You have not mentioned the surname you are seeking. Could you be
running into a similar difficulty?

Stephen Warshall <s_warshall@post.harvard.edu>
Gloucester, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Monthly Update #general

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

During the month of October the Yizkor Book Project put a record-breaking
12 new translations on our web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>.
We now have exactly 50 Yizkor Book items on-line. A heartfelt "thank you"
to our translation donors and our HTML volunteers, and a special
appreciation to our tireless Translations Manager, Joyce Field.

The following nine items are new since our last Update:

* Berezhany, Ukraine - Translation of chapter >from Brzezany, Narajow
ve-ha-seviva; toldot kehilot she-nehrevu (Brzezany Memorial Book),
contributed by Michael Kreindler.

* Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland - Translation of portions of Sefer kehilat
Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza ve-hurbana (Book of the Jewish community of
Dabrowa Gornicza and its destruction), translated and contributed by Lance
Ackerfeld.

* Grebinki, Ukraine - Translation of Aunt Sophie's Letter, translated and
contributed by Leonard Prager.

* Jedwabne (Yedwabne), Poland - Translation of the Table of Contents and
Necrology >from Sefer Jedwabne; Historiya ve-zikaron (Yedwabne: History and
Memorial Book ), translated and contributed by Morlan Ty Rogers.

* Kozienice, Poland - Lists of martyrs >from The book of Kozienice; The
birth and the destruction of a Jewish community, contributed by Phyllis
Goldberg.

* Piaski [Piesk], Belarus - Translation of Necrology from: Pyesk ve-Most;
sefer yizkor (Piesk (Piaski) and Most, a memorial book), transliterated and
donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Sadgura, Ukraine - Translation of the chapter "Sadgura" >from Volume II of
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukowina),
translated by Thea Waldman, contributed by Nicholas Martin.

* Suchowola, Poland - Translation of Necrology from: Khurbn Sukhovolye;
lezikorn fun a yidish shtetl tsvishn Bialystok un Grodne (The Holocaust in
Suchowola; in memory of a Jewish shtetl between Bialystok and Grodno),
transliterated and donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Zheludok (Zoludek), Belarus - Translation of Table of Contents and
Necrology from: Sefer Zoludek ve-Orlowa; galed le-zikaron (The book of
Zoludek [Zhelodok] and Orlowa; a living memorial), translated by Michael
Bohnen and Ellen Sadove Renck, donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

We would like to welcome two new volunteer HTML coders, both of whom join
us >from Israel: Jerry Esterson and Moshe Shavit. Jerry has created our web
pages listed under Siemiatycze (announced last month), Grebenki, and
Kozienice. Moshe provided the pages for Dabrowa Gornicza and Jedwabne.
They join our veteran HTML coder Mike Kalt and our translations advisor,
Susannah Juni, who has generously helping to get our web pages up-to-date.


Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Missing family graves #general

Stephen Warshall <s_warshall@...>
 

Allan Jordan writes:

Going through the New York City area records I have not
been able to find either death certificate but I strongly believe
they lived/died in New York City.
<snip>
No idea why New York City does not have deather certificates
-- any guesses >from anyone reading this?
I have encountered a number of NYC deaths apparently missing >from the
indexes, and they were almost invariably there, but misfiled. The
blunder seemed to arise >from the difficulty the file clerks had in
reading the handwriting of the doctors.

This poses no real problem if the errors are late in the surname, but
an error in the first letter can be a real nuisance, and misreadings
are not that uncommon with certain script capitals. Thus, for
example, capitals Y, T, I, and J are routinely confused with one
another. When I hunt for a surname beginning with one of those, I
frequently have to search in four places.

You have not mentioned the surname you are seeking. Could you be
running into a similar difficulty?

Stephen Warshall <s_warshall@post.harvard.edu>
Gloucester, MA


Hard-To-Read Microfilm for 1897-1902 Passenger Ship Indices #general

Steinsteve@...
 

I tried desperately to read the microfilm at the NYPL for the above, and
the sections I wanted were basically unreadable. Is this a copy of a copy,
and is the original in NARA at DC of better quality? If not, is there
anything that can be done to improve the readibility of these indices?

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


Secret Codes in the NYC Death Indices #general

Steinsteve@...
 

Well, I half-solved my long standing problem of where my great-grandfather,
Harry Davis, died. Though I've known forever that he was buried in Mt.
Hebron Cemetery in Queens in 1951, I could not locate a death certificate
for him.

I took a second look at the NYC death indices today. Though he STILL was
not listed alphabetically, he was among a handful of Davises at the top of
the Davis list (someone put spaces before his first name, forcing him to
sort to the top). However, his borough is listed as "Y" (where M, Q, and R
are obvious, and X and K stand for Bronx and Brooklyn, respectively). The
"Y", the footnote indicates, means he died out-of-city. His Certificate
number is "31", which if you look on the first page of the volume, tells
you that the numbers below 50 indicate what state the deceased died in.
"31" is NYS outside of NYC.

So the question is, does this mean that there is a document at the city
archives telling me where he died, or is there an actual death certificate,
or is there nothing? I assume he is there either because he was a resident
of NYC, or he was buried there (probably the latter).

Any guesses? Anyone know first-hand?

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hard-To-Read Microfilm for 1897-1902 Passenger Ship Indices #general

Steinsteve@...
 

I tried desperately to read the microfilm at the NYPL for the above, and
the sections I wanted were basically unreadable. Is this a copy of a copy,
and is the original in NARA at DC of better quality? If not, is there
anything that can be done to improve the readibility of these indices?

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Secret Codes in the NYC Death Indices #general

Steinsteve@...
 

Well, I half-solved my long standing problem of where my great-grandfather,
Harry Davis, died. Though I've known forever that he was buried in Mt.
Hebron Cemetery in Queens in 1951, I could not locate a death certificate
for him.

I took a second look at the NYC death indices today. Though he STILL was
not listed alphabetically, he was among a handful of Davises at the top of
the Davis list (someone put spaces before his first name, forcing him to
sort to the top). However, his borough is listed as "Y" (where M, Q, and R
are obvious, and X and K stand for Bronx and Brooklyn, respectively). The
"Y", the footnote indicates, means he died out-of-city. His Certificate
number is "31", which if you look on the first page of the volume, tells
you that the numbers below 50 indicate what state the deceased died in.
"31" is NYS outside of NYC.

So the question is, does this mean that there is a document at the city
archives telling me where he died, or is there an actual death certificate,
or is there nothing? I assume he is there either because he was a resident
of NYC, or he was buried there (probably the latter).

Any guesses? Anyone know first-hand?

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


Old City Maps in Lithuania? #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Would anyone know if there are in existence city maps for the following
towns in Lithuania? I am interested in the time period >from about 1860--
1925.

Siauliai, also known as Schavli, Shawli, Szawle
Ukmerge, also known as Vilkomir, Vilkmerge, Wilkomierz
Panevezys, also known as Ponevetz, Punaviz


Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Old City Maps in Lithuania? #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Would anyone know if there are in existence city maps for the following
towns in Lithuania? I am interested in the time period >from about 1860--
1925.

Siauliai, also known as Schavli, Shawli, Szawle
Ukmerge, also known as Vilkomir, Vilkmerge, Wilkomierz
Panevezys, also known as Ponevetz, Punaviz


Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


fyi: Ellis Island InfoFile #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

For an InfoFile with a summary history of Ellis Island, past, present
and future, E-mail to <ellis@mail.jewishgen.org> or
find that file on the JewishGen website.

--
mailto:bkouchel@jewishgen.org
Bernard I. Kouchel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen fyi: Ellis Island InfoFile #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

For an InfoFile with a summary history of Ellis Island, past, present
and future, E-mail to <ellis@mail.jewishgen.org> or
find that file on the JewishGen website.

--
mailto:bkouchel@jewishgen.org
Bernard I. Kouchel


Seeking Help from NY/Brooklyn JewishGenner re: Orphan's Court #general

Julianne and Thomas Lockwood <juto@...>
 

I am seeking help >from a New York/Brooklyn JewishGenner. A little bit of
background first.

On July 23, 1902, Pauline Kirsch, then age 5, was committed to the Brooklyn
Hebrew Orphan Asylum by J.E. Dougherty. Her sister, Julia Kirsch, then
age 3, was committed to BHOA on November 17, 1902, by Homer Folks. There
was at the time, in Kings County, an "orphan's court." If, in fact,
Dougherty and/or Folks were Judges or Magistrates, (rather than, for
example social workers), there is a possibility of a court record which
might contain helpful family history information.

I've been in touch with Sarah Polirer who is the archivist of the NY
Unified Court System who has advised me to try to first determine, before
seeking actual court records, whether in fact Dougherty or Folks was
connected with the Courts. She and others suggest trying to find out by
checking the Vertical Clipping File in the Municipal Library at 31 Chamber
St., checking a Brooklyn Directory for 1902, calling the Kings County Court
to see if they maintain any records of those who have served, and checking
the Who's Who of 1902.

I am in Albuquerque, N. M. and while I have made some phone calls, apart
from checking a Who's Who which I can readily do here, the other possible
avenues of identification of these men is very difficult >from this
distance; long distance phone calls yield very little other than "Hold."
If there is someone out there in Brooklyn or environs who would be willing
to help me follow up on this, it would be most appreciated.


Julianne Lockwood

Searching KIRSCH, GRAUER, EHRLICH, FINKELMAN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Help from NY/Brooklyn JewishGenner re: Orphan's Court #general

Julianne and Thomas Lockwood <juto@...>
 

I am seeking help >from a New York/Brooklyn JewishGenner. A little bit of
background first.

On July 23, 1902, Pauline Kirsch, then age 5, was committed to the Brooklyn
Hebrew Orphan Asylum by J.E. Dougherty. Her sister, Julia Kirsch, then
age 3, was committed to BHOA on November 17, 1902, by Homer Folks. There
was at the time, in Kings County, an "orphan's court." If, in fact,
Dougherty and/or Folks were Judges or Magistrates, (rather than, for
example social workers), there is a possibility of a court record which
might contain helpful family history information.

I've been in touch with Sarah Polirer who is the archivist of the NY
Unified Court System who has advised me to try to first determine, before
seeking actual court records, whether in fact Dougherty or Folks was
connected with the Courts. She and others suggest trying to find out by
checking the Vertical Clipping File in the Municipal Library at 31 Chamber
St., checking a Brooklyn Directory for 1902, calling the Kings County Court
to see if they maintain any records of those who have served, and checking
the Who's Who of 1902.

I am in Albuquerque, N. M. and while I have made some phone calls, apart
from checking a Who's Who which I can readily do here, the other possible
avenues of identification of these men is very difficult >from this
distance; long distance phone calls yield very little other than "Hold."
If there is someone out there in Brooklyn or environs who would be willing
to help me follow up on this, it would be most appreciated.


Julianne Lockwood

Searching KIRSCH, GRAUER, EHRLICH, FINKELMAN


Re: Age (and birth place) discrepancy #general

MomDGP <momdgp@...>
 

My guess is that they wanted to have a more "desirable" age. Maybe they
thought being younger would be an advantage. My Father did the same thing
when he came to this country after WWII.

BTW, he was born in Poland, but the quota that year was filled, so he
claimed instead that he was born in Odessa, got a few friends to back him
up and he was allowed into America. So his citizenship papers, passport,
etc. state a bogus birth date and place. Sometimes you can't believe
"official" documents

Is there any reason that immigrants would lower their actual age
on the ship manifest?

DG Price

MODERATOR NOTE: Where is "this country"? Please include the name of the
place you are writing >from when you post to the discussion group. Our
subscribers are in many countries, and your references may not be clear to
everyone.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Age (and birth place) discrepancy #general

MomDGP <momdgp@...>
 

My guess is that they wanted to have a more "desirable" age. Maybe they
thought being younger would be an advantage. My Father did the same thing
when he came to this country after WWII.

BTW, he was born in Poland, but the quota that year was filled, so he
claimed instead that he was born in Odessa, got a few friends to back him
up and he was allowed into America. So his citizenship papers, passport,
etc. state a bogus birth date and place. Sometimes you can't believe
"official" documents

Is there any reason that immigrants would lower their actual age
on the ship manifest?

DG Price

MODERATOR NOTE: Where is "this country"? Please include the name of the
place you are writing >from when you post to the discussion group. Our
subscribers are in many countries, and your references may not be clear to
everyone.


Pressburg Jews in 1736/ town of Iyvesag/ unrecorded marriages #hungary

Mehadrin@...
 

I visited the main New York Public Library today and found various interesting
items.
1) The "Institut fur Judischen FamilienForschung" (Institute for Jewish Family
Research) was founded in Vienna in 1912 and remained in existence until Paul
Joseph Diamant (its leading figure) emigrated to Israel in 1932. A journal was
published in 1912-13 and again in 1917. It is exceedingly rare, and has never
been reprinted although an index (really just a reproduction of the tables of
contents) was published in the journal Der Schlussel in Vienna in 1970.
There is a lengthy article by Dr Bernard Wachstein, with full lists, of the
Jewish conscription census for Pressburg/Bratislava/Poszony >from the year
1736. He also discusses the important topic of where these Jews came from,
and which other communities supplied them with trade.
2) There is an important article by Dr. A. Freimann, the renowned
bibliographer of Frankfurt-am-Main, about Jewish family trees. Unfortunately,
that issue only covers up to the letter C---with the promise that the rest
would follow. But this is in the last publication of I.J.FF.... was it
finished in another publication...maybe? He also says that the first public
release of Jewish family trees was at an exhibition of them in the Royal
Albert Hall in London, catalogued by Lucien Wolf (I think in 1879).
3) Now a personal request for help. In the summer of 1774, my g-g-g-g-gf Rabbi
Leib Zwebner was ordained in Prague by the renowned Rabbi Yechezkel Landau
(known as the Noda BiYehudah). The document refers to him as coming "from
Hungary, >from the city of Sha'ag." My late father said that he thought the
town was really called Iyvesag, or something similar, but was known in the
Jewish dialect as Sha'ag. Does anyone know which city this is? Is it an old
name for some better known place.... the Hebrew text does describe it as a
city, rather than a small place.... Any ideas?
4) While talking to Ms. Fixler, the very helpful librarian at the Jewish
Division of the library, to whom I was introduced by the ever-resourceful and
well-connected Louis Schonfeld, she drew my attention to the fact that a
relative of hers had an unregistered marriage in 19th century Hungary. And
this was despite the fact that he was actually a government official!?!! In
the course of discussion we realised that he had evidently registered his
first marriage, but when his wife died and he remarried her younger
sister---it was not recorded, and hence her children bore her maiden name and
were recorded as born out of wedlock!
I suggested, and think I have heard talk of this before among experts, that in
there were several relatives who were sanctioned for marriage by Jewish law
but not by canon law. Examples include an uncle marrying his niece. In cases
when this occurred the marriage was celebrated privately with a Jewish
religious ceremony, but went unrecorded and children had to be registered
under the mother's maiden name. I wonder if church law in Hungary forbade
marrying two sisters, even if the first sister is no longer alive when the
second weds. Does anyone know... perhaps we have a matrimonial lawyer with
historical interests among our readers?
This might resolve some of our readers' questions.
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
mehadrin@aol.com


Legal name change? #general

Shmuel and Shoshana Arnold <darnold@...>
 

Hi,

My great-grandfather's name was listed on his Certificate of Arrival (from
Russia) as being
Peisach Arschinow. However, on his Declaration of Intent, Petition of
Naturalization,Oath of Allegiance, etc.
it lists his name as Phillip Arshinoff.

The same is true of my great-grandmother. Her Certificate of Arrival (from
Russia) says Cirle Arschinow,
but all the other papers say Sylvia (or in some cases, Celia or Sillia). I
knew her briefly when
she was alive and everyone called her Sylvia.

So my question is, would they have had to undergo a legal name change to do
this? Or did they just anglicize
their names? Or perhaps both names were legal (ie. Peisach, obviously a
Hebrew name and Phillip being his
English name,etc.)?

If they did do a legal name change, where would I find these records?

Thanks.

Shoshana Silverstein Arnold

Researching:

SILVERSTEIN
ARSHINOFF (ARSCHINOW)
SHAHARBANI (SHARBANI)
ABD-AL NABI
JOSEPH
LEVY (Iraq/Iran)
COHEN (Iraq/Iran)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Pressburg Jews in 1736/ town of Iyvesag/ unrecorded marriages #hungary

Mehadrin@...
 

I visited the main New York Public Library today and found various interesting
items.
1) The "Institut fur Judischen FamilienForschung" (Institute for Jewish Family
Research) was founded in Vienna in 1912 and remained in existence until Paul
Joseph Diamant (its leading figure) emigrated to Israel in 1932. A journal was
published in 1912-13 and again in 1917. It is exceedingly rare, and has never
been reprinted although an index (really just a reproduction of the tables of
contents) was published in the journal Der Schlussel in Vienna in 1970.
There is a lengthy article by Dr Bernard Wachstein, with full lists, of the
Jewish conscription census for Pressburg/Bratislava/Poszony >from the year
1736. He also discusses the important topic of where these Jews came from,
and which other communities supplied them with trade.
2) There is an important article by Dr. A. Freimann, the renowned
bibliographer of Frankfurt-am-Main, about Jewish family trees. Unfortunately,
that issue only covers up to the letter C---with the promise that the rest
would follow. But this is in the last publication of I.J.FF.... was it
finished in another publication...maybe? He also says that the first public
release of Jewish family trees was at an exhibition of them in the Royal
Albert Hall in London, catalogued by Lucien Wolf (I think in 1879).
3) Now a personal request for help. In the summer of 1774, my g-g-g-g-gf Rabbi
Leib Zwebner was ordained in Prague by the renowned Rabbi Yechezkel Landau
(known as the Noda BiYehudah). The document refers to him as coming "from
Hungary, >from the city of Sha'ag." My late father said that he thought the
town was really called Iyvesag, or something similar, but was known in the
Jewish dialect as Sha'ag. Does anyone know which city this is? Is it an old
name for some better known place.... the Hebrew text does describe it as a
city, rather than a small place.... Any ideas?
4) While talking to Ms. Fixler, the very helpful librarian at the Jewish
Division of the library, to whom I was introduced by the ever-resourceful and
well-connected Louis Schonfeld, she drew my attention to the fact that a
relative of hers had an unregistered marriage in 19th century Hungary. And
this was despite the fact that he was actually a government official!?!! In
the course of discussion we realised that he had evidently registered his
first marriage, but when his wife died and he remarried her younger
sister---it was not recorded, and hence her children bore her maiden name and
were recorded as born out of wedlock!
I suggested, and think I have heard talk of this before among experts, that in
there were several relatives who were sanctioned for marriage by Jewish law
but not by canon law. Examples include an uncle marrying his niece. In cases
when this occurred the marriage was celebrated privately with a Jewish
religious ceremony, but went unrecorded and children had to be registered
under the mother's maiden name. I wonder if church law in Hungary forbade
marrying two sisters, even if the first sister is no longer alive when the
second weds. Does anyone know... perhaps we have a matrimonial lawyer with
historical interests among our readers?
This might resolve some of our readers' questions.
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
mehadrin@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Legal name change? #general

Shmuel and Shoshana Arnold <darnold@...>
 

Hi,

My great-grandfather's name was listed on his Certificate of Arrival (from
Russia) as being
Peisach Arschinow. However, on his Declaration of Intent, Petition of
Naturalization,Oath of Allegiance, etc.
it lists his name as Phillip Arshinoff.

The same is true of my great-grandmother. Her Certificate of Arrival (from
Russia) says Cirle Arschinow,
but all the other papers say Sylvia (or in some cases, Celia or Sillia). I
knew her briefly when
she was alive and everyone called her Sylvia.

So my question is, would they have had to undergo a legal name change to do
this? Or did they just anglicize
their names? Or perhaps both names were legal (ie. Peisach, obviously a
Hebrew name and Phillip being his
English name,etc.)?

If they did do a legal name change, where would I find these records?

Thanks.

Shoshana Silverstein Arnold

Researching:

SILVERSTEIN
ARSHINOFF (ARSCHINOW)
SHAHARBANI (SHARBANI)
ABD-AL NABI
JOSEPH
LEVY (Iraq/Iran)
COHEN (Iraq/Iran)