Date   

History of Brody, Galicia #galicia

Andreas Inhofner <A.Inhofner@...>
 

Hi Galicianers,

the following text is taken >from an official leaflet of the town Brody
in 1993. In the same year they built the memorial of victims of
Holocaust near the Jewish Cemetary also. Text is >from modern Ukrainian
view, but reminders to Jewish settlement:

-------BRODY 1084------

Brody, one of the most ancient towns of Ukraine, lies in the
South-East of Lviv region, at the crossing routes leading from
East to West, >from North to South. Archeological findings have
been made in the outskirts of the town dating to the Stone age
(XII thousand years B. C.). In the Kyiv Rus era there was a
settlement here, first mentioned in the "Lessons of Volodimir
Monomakh" for his children. In 1084 and 1085 two important
meetings had place here between the prince Volodimir Monomakh
and the prince of Volyn Yaropolk Iziaslavitch.

In 1241 Brody was completely ruined by Mongol and Tartar
hordes of khan Batiy. Since the XV century the town was
occupied by Polish magnates. In 1584 Brody got the so called
Magdeburg Right and the town status. It was ruled by a town
council. One of council members was appointed by the town
owner, others were elected by the population.

In the XVII century, when Brody belonged to commander-in-chief
of the Polish army Stanislav Konietspolsky, the construction
of the fortress and of fortifications around the town had
begun: The buildings had been designed and the works had been
monitored by the famous French military engeneer Beayplan and
the Italian architect Andrea del Aqua.

The main historical monuments also appeared in the XVII-th
century: church of Holy Godfather's Birth (1601), church of
the St.Yury (1625), catholic church of the St. Spirit and
others. The jewish community erected a sinagogue: The
population of the town then reached the level of 3,5 - 5
thousand. In were mostly middle and small tradesmen,
handicraftsman. >from the point of view of nationality a
considerable part of townsmen were Jews, which were followed
by Poles, Ukrainians, Armenians.

The town of Brody found its honourable place in the national
liberation wars of Ukrainian people against Poland in 1648 -
1654. In September 1648 some regiments of Bogdan Khmelnitsky's
army, headed by colonels Nebaba and Netchay assisted by local
Ukrainian population, had liberated the town and had been
holding it in there hands for 8 weeks.

Since 1772 till 1918 Brody lived under the Austrian rule. In
1779 it received rights of a free trade town. It was even
called a "warehouse of Europe and Asia". Its population grew
and reached the mark of about 20 thousand in 1880.

The Austrian government stimulated development of education in
the country. A boy's gymnasium had been built in 1883. It was
attended by some great men of Ukrainian culture and
literature, among them painters I. Trush and Y. Fediuk, great
Austrian writer I. Roth, scientist and poet V. Yashtchun,
general of the Ukrainian Uprising Army M. Tarnavsky. Among the
teaching staff stood a well known poet V. Shtchurat, clergyman
M. Osadtsa. Brody was often visited by I. Franko, A.
Sheptytsky, Lesia Ukrayinka.

Many Brody residents took an active part in the struggle for
Ukrainian independence in the period between two world wars
and after the World War II. After the fall of Austrian Empire
in 1918 Ukrainian community of the town took the sides with the
West Ukrainian People's Republic and fought against Polish
agressors.

Since 1919 till 1939 the town lived under the Polish
occupation but its best sons and daughters made all their
possible to develop national culture and preserve national
traditions. Among the most devoted guardians of national
spirit were the musical association "Boyan" (1925) and the
newspaper "News of Brody", published in Ukrainian (1936-1939).

In 1944 Brody found itself in the center of battles between
the Soviet Union and the fascist Germany and was substantially
destroyed. Only 569 houses (of 2280) and some 700 inhabitants
(of 20 thousand) survived. 18 thousand Jews had been killed
during the German occupation >from 1942 till 1944. Side by side
with German armies, which opposed the Soviet Troops near Brody
in July 1944, fought the Ukrainian division "Galicia"
suffering heavy losses.

Under the Soviet rule the Brody residents, especially Greek-
Catholic clergy and nationally conscious Ukrainians suffered
from unhuman stalinist repressions, but managed to sustain the
national bias of the town and of the whole district. Brody and
the district became one of the most developped agricutural
areas of Lviv region.

In 1984 the town celebrated its 900-th anniversary. Exactly in
those days the 1-st reunion of Brody residents took place in
Toronto, organized by O. Kapiy, Y. Tchorniy, V. Tsikhatsky and
other Canadian Ukrainians.

In the meantime the activity of national political forces in
Brody became stronger and resulted in 1989 in creation of the
People's movement of Ukraine, called "Ruh", led by the deputy
of the Supreme Council of Ukraine D. Tshobit. Today, when
Ukraine enjoys her independence, Brody remains a pillar of
Ukrainian spirit and of Ukrainian national Renaissance. The 3-
d reunion of former Brody residents, initiated by the new town
authority, is an irrefutable proof of it.

That's all. Andreas Inhofner, Vienna. A.Inhofner@aon.at


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia History of Brody, Galicia #galicia

Andreas Inhofner <A.Inhofner@...>
 

Hi Galicianers,

the following text is taken >from an official leaflet of the town Brody
in 1993. In the same year they built the memorial of victims of
Holocaust near the Jewish Cemetary also. Text is >from modern Ukrainian
view, but reminders to Jewish settlement:

-------BRODY 1084------

Brody, one of the most ancient towns of Ukraine, lies in the
South-East of Lviv region, at the crossing routes leading from
East to West, >from North to South. Archeological findings have
been made in the outskirts of the town dating to the Stone age
(XII thousand years B. C.). In the Kyiv Rus era there was a
settlement here, first mentioned in the "Lessons of Volodimir
Monomakh" for his children. In 1084 and 1085 two important
meetings had place here between the prince Volodimir Monomakh
and the prince of Volyn Yaropolk Iziaslavitch.

In 1241 Brody was completely ruined by Mongol and Tartar
hordes of khan Batiy. Since the XV century the town was
occupied by Polish magnates. In 1584 Brody got the so called
Magdeburg Right and the town status. It was ruled by a town
council. One of council members was appointed by the town
owner, others were elected by the population.

In the XVII century, when Brody belonged to commander-in-chief
of the Polish army Stanislav Konietspolsky, the construction
of the fortress and of fortifications around the town had
begun: The buildings had been designed and the works had been
monitored by the famous French military engeneer Beayplan and
the Italian architect Andrea del Aqua.

The main historical monuments also appeared in the XVII-th
century: church of Holy Godfather's Birth (1601), church of
the St.Yury (1625), catholic church of the St. Spirit and
others. The jewish community erected a sinagogue: The
population of the town then reached the level of 3,5 - 5
thousand. In were mostly middle and small tradesmen,
handicraftsman. >from the point of view of nationality a
considerable part of townsmen were Jews, which were followed
by Poles, Ukrainians, Armenians.

The town of Brody found its honourable place in the national
liberation wars of Ukrainian people against Poland in 1648 -
1654. In September 1648 some regiments of Bogdan Khmelnitsky's
army, headed by colonels Nebaba and Netchay assisted by local
Ukrainian population, had liberated the town and had been
holding it in there hands for 8 weeks.

Since 1772 till 1918 Brody lived under the Austrian rule. In
1779 it received rights of a free trade town. It was even
called a "warehouse of Europe and Asia". Its population grew
and reached the mark of about 20 thousand in 1880.

The Austrian government stimulated development of education in
the country. A boy's gymnasium had been built in 1883. It was
attended by some great men of Ukrainian culture and
literature, among them painters I. Trush and Y. Fediuk, great
Austrian writer I. Roth, scientist and poet V. Yashtchun,
general of the Ukrainian Uprising Army M. Tarnavsky. Among the
teaching staff stood a well known poet V. Shtchurat, clergyman
M. Osadtsa. Brody was often visited by I. Franko, A.
Sheptytsky, Lesia Ukrayinka.

Many Brody residents took an active part in the struggle for
Ukrainian independence in the period between two world wars
and after the World War II. After the fall of Austrian Empire
in 1918 Ukrainian community of the town took the sides with the
West Ukrainian People's Republic and fought against Polish
agressors.

Since 1919 till 1939 the town lived under the Polish
occupation but its best sons and daughters made all their
possible to develop national culture and preserve national
traditions. Among the most devoted guardians of national
spirit were the musical association "Boyan" (1925) and the
newspaper "News of Brody", published in Ukrainian (1936-1939).

In 1944 Brody found itself in the center of battles between
the Soviet Union and the fascist Germany and was substantially
destroyed. Only 569 houses (of 2280) and some 700 inhabitants
(of 20 thousand) survived. 18 thousand Jews had been killed
during the German occupation >from 1942 till 1944. Side by side
with German armies, which opposed the Soviet Troops near Brody
in July 1944, fought the Ukrainian division "Galicia"
suffering heavy losses.

Under the Soviet rule the Brody residents, especially Greek-
Catholic clergy and nationally conscious Ukrainians suffered
from unhuman stalinist repressions, but managed to sustain the
national bias of the town and of the whole district. Brody and
the district became one of the most developped agricutural
areas of Lviv region.

In 1984 the town celebrated its 900-th anniversary. Exactly in
those days the 1-st reunion of Brody residents took place in
Toronto, organized by O. Kapiy, Y. Tchorniy, V. Tsikhatsky and
other Canadian Ukrainians.

In the meantime the activity of national political forces in
Brody became stronger and resulted in 1989 in creation of the
People's movement of Ukraine, called "Ruh", led by the deputy
of the Supreme Council of Ukraine D. Tshobit. Today, when
Ukraine enjoys her independence, Brody remains a pillar of
Ukrainian spirit and of Ukrainian national Renaissance. The 3-
d reunion of former Brody residents, initiated by the new town
authority, is an irrefutable proof of it.

That's all. Andreas Inhofner, Vienna. A.Inhofner@aon.at


Attention: Rose Mary SIMS RUDY #general

JKrupp1@...
 

My e-mail to you has bounced.
I have questions about the Malastovsky family listing.
Please contact me.

Jeaninne Krupp
Wheeling, Illinois

JKrupp1@aol.com

JKrupp1@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Attention: Rose Mary SIMS RUDY #general

JKrupp1@...
 

My e-mail to you has bounced.
I have questions about the Malastovsky family listing.
Please contact me.

Jeaninne Krupp
Wheeling, Illinois

JKrupp1@aol.com

JKrupp1@aol.com


book in Russian #galicia

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

This was posted to the Volhynia digest, but I thought it might be of
interest to some GG members.

Subject: One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine (Book in Russian)

Ellen Shindelman wrote:

Evie Mintzer (EMintzer@compuserve.com) asked me to post this on the
Volhynia listserve and pass it on to interested researchers. I do not
have a copy of the book. You can contact Evie directly via email or
the author Yan Privorotsky. I do not have any additional info other
than what is posted here.

Evie reports that Yan Privorotsky, Umanskaya str., 37-31, Kiev 252087,
Ukraine was her guide in Kiev on a 1997 shtetl trip. "He is working on his
thesis for a Doctorate degree concerning the Jews of Kiev and Kiev Province
(the end of the 10- the beginning of the 20th centuries.) Yan sent me a
book about 100 shetls written in Russian. He was employed by the Israeli
Embassy when we used him for our guide."

The book is a historical guide "one hundred shtetls of Ukraine" issue 1
Jewish communities of Podoliya. This issue was published in 1997 and
contains over 100 pictures both >from archives and the present day. There
are two dozen historical and
topographical maps and charts along with fragments >from folklore and
documentary text. The book begins with historical articles and tells of the
outstanding people within the shtetls, both lay and spiritual.

The project is being undertaken by Israel. The issue I have is written in
Russian. I don't know whether it also was published in English. You may
wish to pass this information on. The Israel site is the Jerusalem Center
for Documentation of the Diaspora Heritage.

According to Evie, the shtetls to be featured are:
1. Annopol 51. Makarov
2. Balta 52. Medzhibozh ****
3. Belaya Tserkov 53. Mezhiriche
4. Belz 54. Mogilev-Podolsky
5. Berdichev 55. Mur=E2f=E2
6. Berezhany 56. Nemirov
7. Berestechko 57. Novaya Gushitsa
8. Bershad 58. Novograd-Volensky
9. Boguslav 59. Ozarintse
10. Bolekhov 60. Ostrog
11. Borshchev 61. Pechenezhen
12. Bratslav 62. Podgaytse
13. Brody 63. Polonnoye
14. Busk 64. Rakhov
15. Buchach 65. Rovno
16. Vezhnetsa 66. Rogatin
17. Vinnytsya 67. Sambor
18. Venogradov 68. Satanov ****
19. Veshnevets 69. Skala-Podolskaya
20. Vladimir-Volensky (Ludmir) 70. Skvira
21. Gaysin 71. Slavuta
22. Galech 72. Smotrich
23. Gusyaten 73. Snyaten
24. Derazhnya **** 74. Sokal
25. Dobromil 75. Sokolets
26. Dolina 76. Starokon-Stantinov
27. Drogobich 77. Starey Sambor
28. Dubno 78. Strey
29. Zhvanets 79. Ternopol
30. Zhitomir 80. Tolstoy
31. Zhmerinka 81. Tomashpol
32. Zholkva 82. Trostyanets
33. Zbarazh 83. Tulchin
34. Zinkov **** 84. Turka
35. Ivano-Frankovsk (Stanislav) 85. Uzhgorod
36. Izyaslav (Zaslavl) 86. Uman
37. Ilintse 87. Fastov (Khvastov)
38. Kamenets-Polodsky 88. Khmelnitsky(Proskurov)****
39. Kiev 89. Khotin
40. Kolomeya 90. Khust
41. Komargorod 91. Chernivtse
42. Korets 92. Chernovtsy
43. Korolivka 93. Chechelnich
44. Kopaygorod 94. Chortkov
45. Kosov 95. Shargorod
46. Kremenets 96. Shepetovka
47. Kute 97. Yavlonov
48. Letichev **** 98. Yazlovetz
49. Lutsk 99. Yampol
50. Lvov 100. Yarmolintse

The starred shtetls are featured in this first issue of the book. There are
short entries on Gorodok, Kuz'min, Kupin, Mikhalpol', Nikolayev, Staraya
Sinyava, Tarnoruda, Fel'shtin, Chornyl Ostrov, Sharovka, Yarmolintsy. It
contains 117 pictures, 17 maps and plans. There are 3 articles: Podolia
Jews in XIV-XVII centuries, Podolia shtetls, Ancient Jewish Foklore. This
is the first issue. In each town featured there is included the synagogues
and a shoah section. There are pictures of gravestones, a history section
and some photos prior to WWII.
Joyce Field
West Lafayette, Indiana
jfield@pop.nlci.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Several of the towns listed were in Galicia.
However, Podalia, the subject of Issue 1, was not in Galicia.


Re: Independent Slonimer Benevolent Society #general

Susan&David
 

Consult the New York section of the Cemetery Project at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/newyorkn.htm
You can sort through the Brooklyn & Queens information to see if any
cemeteries have sections for the Independent Slonimer Ben. Soc.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


Judi Englander wrote:

Does anybody know which cemeteries in Brooklyn and Queens provided free
burials through the Independent Slonimer Benevolent Society in 1914? The
only cemetery I am aware of is Mt. Zion.
Thanks.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia book in Russian #galicia

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

This was posted to the Volhynia digest, but I thought it might be of
interest to some GG members.

Subject: One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine (Book in Russian)

Ellen Shindelman wrote:

Evie Mintzer (EMintzer@compuserve.com) asked me to post this on the
Volhynia listserve and pass it on to interested researchers. I do not
have a copy of the book. You can contact Evie directly via email or
the author Yan Privorotsky. I do not have any additional info other
than what is posted here.

Evie reports that Yan Privorotsky, Umanskaya str., 37-31, Kiev 252087,
Ukraine was her guide in Kiev on a 1997 shtetl trip. "He is working on his
thesis for a Doctorate degree concerning the Jews of Kiev and Kiev Province
(the end of the 10- the beginning of the 20th centuries.) Yan sent me a
book about 100 shetls written in Russian. He was employed by the Israeli
Embassy when we used him for our guide."

The book is a historical guide "one hundred shtetls of Ukraine" issue 1
Jewish communities of Podoliya. This issue was published in 1997 and
contains over 100 pictures both >from archives and the present day. There
are two dozen historical and
topographical maps and charts along with fragments >from folklore and
documentary text. The book begins with historical articles and tells of the
outstanding people within the shtetls, both lay and spiritual.

The project is being undertaken by Israel. The issue I have is written in
Russian. I don't know whether it also was published in English. You may
wish to pass this information on. The Israel site is the Jerusalem Center
for Documentation of the Diaspora Heritage.

According to Evie, the shtetls to be featured are:
1. Annopol 51. Makarov
2. Balta 52. Medzhibozh ****
3. Belaya Tserkov 53. Mezhiriche
4. Belz 54. Mogilev-Podolsky
5. Berdichev 55. Mur=E2f=E2
6. Berezhany 56. Nemirov
7. Berestechko 57. Novaya Gushitsa
8. Bershad 58. Novograd-Volensky
9. Boguslav 59. Ozarintse
10. Bolekhov 60. Ostrog
11. Borshchev 61. Pechenezhen
12. Bratslav 62. Podgaytse
13. Brody 63. Polonnoye
14. Busk 64. Rakhov
15. Buchach 65. Rovno
16. Vezhnetsa 66. Rogatin
17. Vinnytsya 67. Sambor
18. Venogradov 68. Satanov ****
19. Veshnevets 69. Skala-Podolskaya
20. Vladimir-Volensky (Ludmir) 70. Skvira
21. Gaysin 71. Slavuta
22. Galech 72. Smotrich
23. Gusyaten 73. Snyaten
24. Derazhnya **** 74. Sokal
25. Dobromil 75. Sokolets
26. Dolina 76. Starokon-Stantinov
27. Drogobich 77. Starey Sambor
28. Dubno 78. Strey
29. Zhvanets 79. Ternopol
30. Zhitomir 80. Tolstoy
31. Zhmerinka 81. Tomashpol
32. Zholkva 82. Trostyanets
33. Zbarazh 83. Tulchin
34. Zinkov **** 84. Turka
35. Ivano-Frankovsk (Stanislav) 85. Uzhgorod
36. Izyaslav (Zaslavl) 86. Uman
37. Ilintse 87. Fastov (Khvastov)
38. Kamenets-Polodsky 88. Khmelnitsky(Proskurov)****
39. Kiev 89. Khotin
40. Kolomeya 90. Khust
41. Komargorod 91. Chernivtse
42. Korets 92. Chernovtsy
43. Korolivka 93. Chechelnich
44. Kopaygorod 94. Chortkov
45. Kosov 95. Shargorod
46. Kremenets 96. Shepetovka
47. Kute 97. Yavlonov
48. Letichev **** 98. Yazlovetz
49. Lutsk 99. Yampol
50. Lvov 100. Yarmolintse

The starred shtetls are featured in this first issue of the book. There are
short entries on Gorodok, Kuz'min, Kupin, Mikhalpol', Nikolayev, Staraya
Sinyava, Tarnoruda, Fel'shtin, Chornyl Ostrov, Sharovka, Yarmolintsy. It
contains 117 pictures, 17 maps and plans. There are 3 articles: Podolia
Jews in XIV-XVII centuries, Podolia shtetls, Ancient Jewish Foklore. This
is the first issue. In each town featured there is included the synagogues
and a shoah section. There are pictures of gravestones, a history section
and some photos prior to WWII.
Joyce Field
West Lafayette, Indiana
jfield@pop.nlci.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Several of the towns listed were in Galicia.
However, Podalia, the subject of Issue 1, was not in Galicia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Independent Slonimer Benevolent Society #general

Susan&David
 

Consult the New York section of the Cemetery Project at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/newyorkn.htm
You can sort through the Brooklyn & Queens information to see if any
cemeteries have sections for the Independent Slonimer Ben. Soc.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


Judi Englander wrote:

Does anybody know which cemeteries in Brooklyn and Queens provided free
burials through the Independent Slonimer Benevolent Society in 1914? The
only cemetery I am aware of is Mt. Zion.
Thanks.


Re: NYC Phone book #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Diane Frankel com wrote:

As much as I would like to help all of you in looking up ancestors in the NYC
1918 phone book, it is becoming impossible. I have been bombarded with about
300 requests. Perhaps another time if you have only one name.
For the 300+ of you who needed that information, may I suggest two routes:
First, try your local large library. I was visiting Los Angeles, and
discovered they have an entire set of NY City Directories on microfilm at the
Central Downtown library in the Genealogy room.
Second, try your local Mormon Family History Center. They can order the
microfilm >from Salt Lake, and have it for you in a couple of weeks. You can
order as many rolls as you want; the cost is between $3.00 and $4.00 per roll.
They'll hold the roll for a few weeks, and you can renew it for another few
weeks. They may even have some rolls on permanent loan - mine did.

Besides. this way you can look up as many names as you want, and make prints of
each page for your records!

Here are some film numbers which may help (I did this very project a few months
ago)
(One note: The directory was published every August, so most volumes span two
calendar years)
1909-1910 #1606129
1910-1911 #1606130
1911-1912 #1606131
191201913 #1606132
1913-1914 #1606133
1915 A-M #1606134
1915 N-Z #1606135
1916 A-M #1606136
1916 N-Z #1606137
1917 A-L #1606138
1917 M-Z 1606139
1918, part 1 #1606140
1918 Part 2, to 1920-21 A-M #1606141 (I believe there was no 1919
directory)
1920-21 N-Z #1606142
1922-1923 A-M #1606143
1922-1923 N-Z #1606144
1925 A-M #1606145
1925 N-Z 1606146

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, GA
Researching RINCOVER, HENKIN/GHENKIN, PENSON/PENSAKHINSKY, SREBERG/SCHRIEBER,
POLLACK, BERLIN (Hilda, Willie)
propper@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC Phone book #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Diane Frankel com wrote:

As much as I would like to help all of you in looking up ancestors in the NYC
1918 phone book, it is becoming impossible. I have been bombarded with about
300 requests. Perhaps another time if you have only one name.
For the 300+ of you who needed that information, may I suggest two routes:
First, try your local large library. I was visiting Los Angeles, and
discovered they have an entire set of NY City Directories on microfilm at the
Central Downtown library in the Genealogy room.
Second, try your local Mormon Family History Center. They can order the
microfilm >from Salt Lake, and have it for you in a couple of weeks. You can
order as many rolls as you want; the cost is between $3.00 and $4.00 per roll.
They'll hold the roll for a few weeks, and you can renew it for another few
weeks. They may even have some rolls on permanent loan - mine did.

Besides. this way you can look up as many names as you want, and make prints of
each page for your records!

Here are some film numbers which may help (I did this very project a few months
ago)
(One note: The directory was published every August, so most volumes span two
calendar years)
1909-1910 #1606129
1910-1911 #1606130
1911-1912 #1606131
191201913 #1606132
1913-1914 #1606133
1915 A-M #1606134
1915 N-Z #1606135
1916 A-M #1606136
1916 N-Z #1606137
1917 A-L #1606138
1917 M-Z 1606139
1918, part 1 #1606140
1918 Part 2, to 1920-21 A-M #1606141 (I believe there was no 1919
directory)
1920-21 N-Z #1606142
1922-1923 A-M #1606143
1922-1923 N-Z #1606144
1925 A-M #1606145
1925 N-Z 1606146

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, GA
Researching RINCOVER, HENKIN/GHENKIN, PENSON/PENSAKHINSKY, SREBERG/SCHRIEBER,
POLLACK, BERLIN (Hilda, Willie)
propper@bellsouth.net


FISCHER family in Czechoslovakia #general

amnon fisher <amnonf@...>
 

I'm looking for information on Fischer family, who lived in
Czechoslovakia >from 1800 until 1946 (I know it's a big range, but I
don't have the exact years).

I have some names of peoples:
parents: Herman & Elizabeth (Before getting married, her second name was
Varady, lived in Pochov)
children: Ernest, Emre (or Emrich), Yosef, Lenka (married to Fritz
BRAMER >from Praha), Erena (married to Ernoy) they lived in Velery Meder and Bratislava.

I also know that in 1936 Herman moved to Hungery, and lived in Budapest
and later in Bonihad.
Any information would be helpful.
Please reply to amnonf@canaan.co.il
Thanks in advance.

Amnon Fischer
amnonf@canaan.co.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FISCHER family in Czechoslovakia #general

amnon fisher <amnonf@...>
 

I'm looking for information on Fischer family, who lived in
Czechoslovakia >from 1800 until 1946 (I know it's a big range, but I
don't have the exact years).

I have some names of peoples:
parents: Herman & Elizabeth (Before getting married, her second name was
Varady, lived in Pochov)
children: Ernest, Emre (or Emrich), Yosef, Lenka (married to Fritz
BRAMER >from Praha), Erena (married to Ernoy) they lived in Velery Meder and Bratislava.

I also know that in 1936 Herman moved to Hungery, and lived in Budapest
and later in Bonihad.
Any information would be helpful.
Please reply to amnonf@canaan.co.il
Thanks in advance.

Amnon Fischer
amnonf@canaan.co.il


GONIADZ and GRODNO projects #general

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

The Yizkor Book Project is pleased to announce that two new fundraising
projects have been added to our Jewish Generosity page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>.

Tax-deductible donations can now be made for the translation of the yizkor
books >from Goniadz, Poland and Grodno, Belarus. Susanne Scheraga is
coordinating the translation of SEFER YIZKOR GONIADZ and Miriam Margolyes
is coordinating the translation of the GRODNO yizkor book.

Donations may also be made to the Dokshitsy, Belarus yizkor book
translation project, coordinated by Joel Alpert, and to the Gargzdai,
Lithuania yizkor book project, coordinated by Kevin Ossey.

For more information on the Yizkor Book Project and how you can raise
tax-deductible funds for the translation of a yizkor book, click on to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

Our list of translations can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Please check this
site frequently as the list expands weekly.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GONIADZ and GRODNO projects #general

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

The Yizkor Book Project is pleased to announce that two new fundraising
projects have been added to our Jewish Generosity page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>.

Tax-deductible donations can now be made for the translation of the yizkor
books >from Goniadz, Poland and Grodno, Belarus. Susanne Scheraga is
coordinating the translation of SEFER YIZKOR GONIADZ and Miriam Margolyes
is coordinating the translation of the GRODNO yizkor book.

Donations may also be made to the Dokshitsy, Belarus yizkor book
translation project, coordinated by Joel Alpert, and to the Gargzdai,
Lithuania yizkor book project, coordinated by Kevin Ossey.

For more information on the Yizkor Book Project and how you can raise
tax-deductible funds for the translation of a yizkor book, click on to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

Our list of translations can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Please check this
site frequently as the list expands weekly.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


translating Russian records #general

dprice dprice
 

Judith Frazin's book is terrific for translating Polish documents that
are in Polish. Is there a reference for translating Polish records that
are in Russian (post 1868)?
David Price


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen translating Russian records #general

dprice dprice
 

Judith Frazin's book is terrific for translating Polish documents that
are in Polish. Is there a reference for translating Polish records that
are in Russian (post 1868)?
David Price


SS Arrival Dates #general

Don Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who took the time to respond to my recent inquiry
concerning the information on the New York Passenger List index cards.
Taking the advice I received, I purchased the National Archives
publication, "Immigrant & Passenger Arrivals". When I discovered that
the information on the rolls were accessed according to the date of the
ship's arrival, I decided to cross reference the dates I found on some of
the index cards against those listed for the same ships on Cimorelli. Lo
and behold, I found many discrepancies. Some by just a day or two, but
many by much more.

Since I am planning a trip to the National Archives in DC and want to
maximize my time there, I am trying to determine which rolls I want to
view in advance of my going there. So the question is, does anyone know
which would be more accurate, the INS index cards or Cimorelli?

Cindy Gallard


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SS Arrival Dates #general

Don Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who took the time to respond to my recent inquiry
concerning the information on the New York Passenger List index cards.
Taking the advice I received, I purchased the National Archives
publication, "Immigrant & Passenger Arrivals". When I discovered that
the information on the rolls were accessed according to the date of the
ship's arrival, I decided to cross reference the dates I found on some of
the index cards against those listed for the same ships on Cimorelli. Lo
and behold, I found many discrepancies. Some by just a day or two, but
many by much more.

Since I am planning a trip to the National Archives in DC and want to
maximize my time there, I am trying to determine which rolls I want to
view in advance of my going there. So the question is, does anyone know
which would be more accurate, the INS index cards or Cimorelli?

Cindy Gallard


Yiskor Books #galicia

Carole Feinberg <feincgs@...>
 

Shalom, Fellow Galicianers,

I purchased "The Holocaust of Volhynian Jews 1941-1944" directly >from Yad
Vashem. They charged $25 plus $10 postage, which was less than the $55
quoted price I read in one of the Gesher Galicia postings dated Feb. 22/23,
1999.

I have no axe to grind either way, having had no financial or previous
dealings with the book source in question. I think they should list the
Volhynia book in the section of Yad VaShem publications, since I believe
Yad VaShem was the publisher. That would be a moot point for Galicianers,
anyway, since Volhynia borders easternmost Galicia. Perhaps there may have
been some overlap, but, basically, I found Volhynia and Galicia to have
been distinct >from each other.

As a service to genealogists, I believe that the book dealer should include
a note that not all so-called yiskor books contain a necrology, a list of
decedents, which is one of the main interests of genealogists.

Carole GLICK FEINBERG
Atlanta, GA
<feincgs@mindspring.com>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yiskor Books #galicia

Carole Feinberg <feincgs@...>
 

Shalom, Fellow Galicianers,

I purchased "The Holocaust of Volhynian Jews 1941-1944" directly >from Yad
Vashem. They charged $25 plus $10 postage, which was less than the $55
quoted price I read in one of the Gesher Galicia postings dated Feb. 22/23,
1999.

I have no axe to grind either way, having had no financial or previous
dealings with the book source in question. I think they should list the
Volhynia book in the section of Yad VaShem publications, since I believe
Yad VaShem was the publisher. That would be a moot point for Galicianers,
anyway, since Volhynia borders easternmost Galicia. Perhaps there may have
been some overlap, but, basically, I found Volhynia and Galicia to have
been distinct >from each other.

As a service to genealogists, I believe that the book dealer should include
a note that not all so-called yiskor books contain a necrology, a list of
decedents, which is one of the main interests of genealogists.

Carole GLICK FEINBERG
Atlanta, GA
<feincgs@mindspring.com>