Date   

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Persons Delinquent in Payment of Taxes-Panevezys 1845 #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group has added to the data at its
Shutterfly web site translations of five lists compiled in 1845 of persons
found delinquent in paying ther taxes. The lists are for the towns of Birzai
(160 lines of data), Joniskelis (12 lines of data), Krekenava (75 lines of
data), Linkuva (91 lines of data) and Pakruojis (85 lines of data). These
lists on their face may not seem significant. However, an analysis of the
reasons given for non-payment and the relationship to the period they cover,
the previous two decades, also illustrate some interesting characteristics
of the Jewish communities they represent and the conditions in which they
were living. Of course, we do not know whether the information was collected
by representatives of the communities themselves or by government officials,
though either could be the "usual suspects".

The year 1845 comes at the end of a significant period, which began in 1827,
in the history of the Jews living in the Pale of Settlement. These lists are
a reflection of that period. When the Pale was originally established in
1795, the treatment of the Jews was reasonably benign. However under the
reign of Czar Nicholas I, in 1827, the Jews first became subject to
compulsory military duty. Males between the ages of 12 and 25 could be
conscripted for 25 years to be selected by their community organizations
(Kahals). One of the major objectives of the conscription was to remove the
Jews >from the influences of Jewish society and promote their conversion to
the Orthodox Church.

Penalties were enforced against the Kahals that did not meet their quotas.
In that case, or if a selectee failed to report for service, it led to
conscripting (and even kidnapping for that purpose) males who were
ordinarily exempt, such as children as young as 8, the elderly, the infirm
and persons who were the sole support of their families. The children who
were forced to serve were called "cantonists", because the schools they were
forced to attend were called "canton schools".

In the year 1835, Nicholas I officially demarcated the boundries of the
Pale, beyond which the Jews were forbidden to live, and in 1843 the area was
reduced even further. At the end of 1844, the Kahals were abolished. thus
their roles became limited to conscription agents and tax collectors.
The "basket tax" - a tax on kosher meat - was transfered to municipal
administration. An auxiliary basket tax was levied on immovable property,
business activities and bequests. There was also a Candle Tax, a tax on
Shabbat candles. The receipts were used among other things, to finance Crown
Schools for Jewish children.

Thus the comments made about the persons who did not pay their taxes on
these five lists can be seen to reflect these developments. In Birzai, for
example, between 1835 and 1842, twenty-four persons were "recruited"
(conscripted), but between 1835 and 1841, fifty-three persons were "missing"
(draft dodging). In Pakruojis, 10 persons were recruited and 10 others were
missing. In Krekenava, 57 persons were recruited; none are listed as missing
but 11 are listed as "costs", the meaning of which is obscure. In Linkuva,
13 were recruited and 7 were listed as missing. Only one person, in
Pakruojis, was listed as having converted, while a father and his three sons
were listed as in prison, and one other person was listed as having been
sent to Siberia. The social conditions of the five towns are also reflected
in the comments. The comments illustrate some of the conditions of the less
fortunate, the aged, the disabled and to a lesser extent the presence of
some of the more fortunate among the persons who were not paying their
taxes.

A more detailed explanation has been posted on the Member's Forum at the
Panevezys District's Shutterfly web site. The data will made available for
18 months, exclusively to qualified contributors to the Panevezys District
Research Group before they are added to the All Lithuanian Data Base (ALD).
The Group is open to anyone who makes contributions totaling at least $100
to help finance the translation work of the Group. Smaller contributions,
of course, are always welcome. For further information please contact
www.litvaksig.org/contributions .

Alphabetical lists of surnames on the five lists are available to ANYONE by
contacting me at the email address below.

Chag sameach l'Hanukkah and Shavuah tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@...


Persons Delinquent in Payment of Taxes-Panevezys 1845 #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group has added to the data at its
Shutterfly web site translations of five lists compiled in 1845 of persons
found delinquent in paying ther taxes. The lists are for the towns of Birzai
(160 lines of data), Joniskelis (12 lines of data), Krekenava (75 lines of
data), Linkuva (91 lines of data) and Pakruojis (85 lines of data). These
lists on their face may not seem significant. However, an analysis of the
reasons given for non-payment and the relationship to the period they cover,
the previous two decades, also illustrate some interesting characteristics
of the Jewish communities they represent and the conditions in which they
were living. Of course, we do not know whether the information was collected
by representatives of the communities themselves or by government officials,
though either could be the "usual suspects".

The year 1845 comes at the end of a significant period, which began in 1827,
in the history of the Jews living in the Pale of Settlement. These lists are
a reflection of that period. When the Pale was originally established in
1795, the treatment of the Jews was reasonably benign. However under the
reign of Czar Nicholas I, in 1827, the Jews first became subject to
compulsory military duty. Males between the ages of 12 and 25 could be
conscripted for 25 years to be selected by their community organizations
(Kahals). One of the major objectives of the conscription was to remove the
Jews >from the influences of Jewish society and promote their conversion to
the Orthodox Church.

Penalties were enforced against the Kahals that did not meet their quotas.
In that case, or if a selectee failed to report for service, it led to
conscripting (and even kidnapping for that purpose) males who were
ordinarily exempt, such as children as young as 8, the elderly, the infirm
and persons who were the sole support of their families. The children who
were forced to serve were called "cantonists", because the schools they were
forced to attend were called "canton schools".

In the year 1835, Nicholas I officially demarcated the boundries of the
Pale, beyond which the Jews were forbidden to live, and in 1843 the area was
reduced even further. At the end of 1844, the Kahals were abolished. thus
their roles became limited to conscription agents and tax collectors.
The "basket tax" - a tax on kosher meat - was transfered to municipal
administration. An auxiliary basket tax was levied on immovable property,
business activities and bequests. There was also a Candle Tax, a tax on
Shabbat candles. The receipts were used among other things, to finance Crown
Schools for Jewish children.

Thus the comments made about the persons who did not pay their taxes on
these five lists can be seen to reflect these developments. In Birzai, for
example, between 1835 and 1842, twenty-four persons were "recruited"
(conscripted), but between 1835 and 1841, fifty-three persons were "missing"
(draft dodging). In Pakruojis, 10 persons were recruited and 10 others were
missing. In Krekenava, 57 persons were recruited; none are listed as missing
but 11 are listed as "costs", the meaning of which is obscure. In Linkuva,
13 were recruited and 7 were listed as missing. Only one person, in
Pakruojis, was listed as having converted, while a father and his three sons
were listed as in prison, and one other person was listed as having been
sent to Siberia. The social conditions of the five towns are also reflected
in the comments. The comments illustrate some of the conditions of the less
fortunate, the aged, the disabled and to a lesser extent the presence of
some of the more fortunate among the persons who were not paying their
taxes.

A more detailed explanation has been posted on the Member's Forum at the
Panevezys District's Shutterfly web site. The data will made available for
18 months, exclusively to qualified contributors to the Panevezys District
Research Group before they are added to the All Lithuanian Data Base (ALD).
The Group is open to anyone who makes contributions totaling at least $100
to help finance the translation work of the Group. Smaller contributions,
of course, are always welcome. For further information please contact
www.litvaksig.org/contributions .

Alphabetical lists of surnames on the five lists are available to ANYONE by
contacting me at the email address below.

Chag sameach l'Hanukkah and Shavuah tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Citizens Escape to Russia #general

Irving Skorka <irvela@...>
 

Here is the information I forwarded to Aubrey Jacobus:
I was able to find a very small amount of information on the escape of Jews >from
Nazi Occupied Poland to Russia after September 1, 1939, during WW II.

I did find a reference to the fact that an edict came down >from the Polish
Government after the invasion of Poland. It stated that all male Jews >from 18 to
about 50 years of age were to leave Poland (without their families) and go to
Russia. The purpose was to form an army to fight the Nazis. I have been unable to
track down the reference.

I had an uncle who lived in Poland at the time and he managed to travel to Russia
in 1939. I am looking for some information as to where in Russia he was located and
did he join the Polish or Russian Army. He went there alone without his wife and 2
(?) children.

At the end of the war, he was moved to a DP Camp in Germany. He emigrated to
Australia in 1949 with a woman who he met in the camp. I believe they were married
in the camp. My uncle eventually emigrated to the United States to join his
brothers and sister that had emigrated >from Poland in the early 1920's. Two of his
brothers remained in Poland and were murdered by the Nazis.

Irv Skorka
Member of the JGS of Palm Beach County (Florida)


Polish Citizens Escape to Russia #general

Irving Skorka <irvela@...>
 

Here is the information I forwarded to Aubrey Jacobus:
I was able to find a very small amount of information on the escape of Jews >from
Nazi Occupied Poland to Russia after September 1, 1939, during WW II.

I did find a reference to the fact that an edict came down >from the Polish
Government after the invasion of Poland. It stated that all male Jews >from 18 to
about 50 years of age were to leave Poland (without their families) and go to
Russia. The purpose was to form an army to fight the Nazis. I have been unable to
track down the reference.

I had an uncle who lived in Poland at the time and he managed to travel to Russia
in 1939. I am looking for some information as to where in Russia he was located and
did he join the Polish or Russian Army. He went there alone without his wife and 2
(?) children.

At the end of the war, he was moved to a DP Camp in Germany. He emigrated to
Australia in 1949 with a woman who he met in the camp. I believe they were married
in the camp. My uncle eventually emigrated to the United States to join his
brothers and sister that had emigrated >from Poland in the early 1920's. Two of his
brothers remained in Poland and were murdered by the Nazis.

Irv Skorka
Member of the JGS of Palm Beach County (Florida)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: O'BEDIAH's in India #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

tom wrote on 04 dec 2010 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
Generally correct, but I suggest that the Hebrew Bible and its prophet Ovadiah
predates Islam by many centuries, and therefore "Abdullah" (literally servant of
Allah), is the Arabic for the Hebrew name "Ovadiah" (meaning servant of God).
"Allah" just meaning "God", so not difference. The Arabic form could predate the
Islam by as many years. "Abdullah was once common among Arabic-speaking Jews as
well, especially Iraqi Jews."
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Abdullah_(name)>

Abd- =, "Servant" Abdallah as a Jewish name in Arabic Abdallah Ibn Saba, a Jew of
Yemen, who embraced Islam. etc.
<http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view_page.jsp?artid=189&letter=A&pid=0>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Re: O'BEDIAH's in India #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

tom wrote on 04 dec 2010 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
Generally correct, but I suggest that the Hebrew Bible and its prophet Ovadiah
predates Islam by many centuries, and therefore "Abdullah" (literally servant of
Allah), is the Arabic for the Hebrew name "Ovadiah" (meaning servant of God).
"Allah" just meaning "God", so not difference. The Arabic form could predate the
Islam by as many years. "Abdullah was once common among Arabic-speaking Jews as
well, especially Iraqi Jews."
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Abdullah_(name)>

Abd- =, "Servant" Abdallah as a Jewish name in Arabic Abdallah Ibn Saba, a Jew of
Yemen, who embraced Islam. etc.
<http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view_page.jsp?artid=189&letter=A&pid=0>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname Confusion #general

Martin Davis (CDA) <martin.davis@...>
 

Most Jews who lived in the areas which today constitute Poland, Lithuania, Belarus
and Ukraine did not use inherited family names until the late 18th century. The
exceptions were there but they appear to have been rare. The family name normally
followed the Jewish tradition of using the patronymic (e.g. son of Isaac); so each
generation would change its family name according to whatever first name their
father had been given. Not a problem when you live in a small town or village where
everyone knows everyone else.

However, in the late 18th century Poland/Lithuania there were significant changes
in public administration; intended to formalise state control of resident Jewish
populations. Additionally, Jewish councils (the Kahals) had removed >from them the
power to manage the taxation of Jewish communities on behalf of the State; so the
previous intimacy between Jewish council and resident Jews, which had enabled a
loose naming and identification process to function was no longer workable. Jewish
naming patterns were seen by these new authorities as a bar to 'population
management' and to ensuring the taxation of Jews was a successful project.

In this early period there were at least four distinct ways in which Jewish people
of Polish/Lithuanian origin got their family names. The most straightforward is the
adoption and or purchase of family names as a result of governmental requirements
imposed >from 1788(Galicia)- see http://www.shoreshim.org/en/infoEmperorJoseph.asp ,
1792 (Prussia) - see http://members.core.com/~mikerose/history2.htm etc. They are
the trade names, token names, plants and fruits names etc. The second way was
through a direct translation of a patronymic into a family name - quite common in
the more conservative rural Slavic language areas and a neat fit with Jewish
communal practice. The third way was through a more ancient lineage or
identification, originating in a non Slavic speaking country (Spain, Italy, France,
Germany etc) or through an adoption of a name associated with a Royal or noble
declaration or as the identification of a rabbinic lineage. The fourth way was
through the adoption of the town name >from where a person lived or traded such as
Avrum Lublinsky- the English language equivalent could be Abraham Lincoln.

The most obvious changes in the later 19th century occurred when a Jewish family
migrated to another country and found their family name 'unacceptable' or a
hindrance in some way - an example were those Jewish families who changed their
Germanic sounding names at the onset of the First World War to avoid being
persecuted as enemy residents. The result of such changes could mean that brothers
chose different family names and sometimes names without any apparent logical link
either to each other or to the original family name.

Finally, to Aubrey Jacobus' question re the vexed issue of name changes to avoid
serving 25 years of conscription to the Tsar's army (changed to in the 1870's to
six years). The simple facts were that the avoidance of Jewish conscription into
the army of Imperial Russia was something that was recognised as a possibility in
the Russia parliament and in its legislation - Jewish families being liable to be
fined the huge sum of 300 rubles for conscription evasion (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ru-mil.txt). I would guess that it is possible
that a name change could have occurred for attempted conscription avoidance reasons
but it seems unlikely that it was a common reason anymore than conscription
avoidance was common. It should also be remembered that the army conscription
legislation was not applied in Congress Poland.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


Surname Confusion #general

Martin Davis (CDA) <martin.davis@...>
 

Most Jews who lived in the areas which today constitute Poland, Lithuania, Belarus
and Ukraine did not use inherited family names until the late 18th century. The
exceptions were there but they appear to have been rare. The family name normally
followed the Jewish tradition of using the patronymic (e.g. son of Isaac); so each
generation would change its family name according to whatever first name their
father had been given. Not a problem when you live in a small town or village where
everyone knows everyone else.

However, in the late 18th century Poland/Lithuania there were significant changes
in public administration; intended to formalise state control of resident Jewish
populations. Additionally, Jewish councils (the Kahals) had removed >from them the
power to manage the taxation of Jewish communities on behalf of the State; so the
previous intimacy between Jewish council and resident Jews, which had enabled a
loose naming and identification process to function was no longer workable. Jewish
naming patterns were seen by these new authorities as a bar to 'population
management' and to ensuring the taxation of Jews was a successful project.

In this early period there were at least four distinct ways in which Jewish people
of Polish/Lithuanian origin got their family names. The most straightforward is the
adoption and or purchase of family names as a result of governmental requirements
imposed >from 1788(Galicia)- see http://www.shoreshim.org/en/infoEmperorJoseph.asp ,
1792 (Prussia) - see http://members.core.com/~mikerose/history2.htm etc. They are
the trade names, token names, plants and fruits names etc. The second way was
through a direct translation of a patronymic into a family name - quite common in
the more conservative rural Slavic language areas and a neat fit with Jewish
communal practice. The third way was through a more ancient lineage or
identification, originating in a non Slavic speaking country (Spain, Italy, France,
Germany etc) or through an adoption of a name associated with a Royal or noble
declaration or as the identification of a rabbinic lineage. The fourth way was
through the adoption of the town name >from where a person lived or traded such as
Avrum Lublinsky- the English language equivalent could be Abraham Lincoln.

The most obvious changes in the later 19th century occurred when a Jewish family
migrated to another country and found their family name 'unacceptable' or a
hindrance in some way - an example were those Jewish families who changed their
Germanic sounding names at the onset of the First World War to avoid being
persecuted as enemy residents. The result of such changes could mean that brothers
chose different family names and sometimes names without any apparent logical link
either to each other or to the original family name.

Finally, to Aubrey Jacobus' question re the vexed issue of name changes to avoid
serving 25 years of conscription to the Tsar's army (changed to in the 1870's to
six years). The simple facts were that the avoidance of Jewish conscription into
the army of Imperial Russia was something that was recognised as a possibility in
the Russia parliament and in its legislation - Jewish families being liable to be
fined the huge sum of 300 rubles for conscription evasion (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ru-mil.txt). I would guess that it is possible
that a name change could have occurred for attempted conscription avoidance reasons
but it seems unlikely that it was a common reason anymore than conscription
avoidance was common. It should also be remembered that the army conscription
legislation was not applied in Congress Poland.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Persons Delinquent in Payment of Taxes-Panevezys 1845 #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group has added to the data at its Shutterfly web
site translations of five lists compiled in 1845 of persons found delinquent in
paying ther taxes. The lists are for the towns of Birzai (160 lines of data),
Joniskelis (12 lines of data), Krekenava (75 lines of data), Linkuva (91 lines of
data) and Pakruojis (85 lines of data). These lists on their face may not seem
significant. However, an analysis of the reasons given for non-payment and the
relationship to the period they cover, the previous two decades, also illustrate
some interesting characteristics of the Jewish communities they represent and the
conditions in which they were living. Of course, we do not know whether the
information was collected by representatives of the communities themselves or by
government officials, though either could be the "usual suspects".

The year 1845 comes at the end of a significant period, which began in 1827, in the
history of the Jews living in the Pale of Settlement. These lists are a reflection
of that period. When the Pale was originally established in 1795, the treatment of
the Jews was reasonably benign. However under the reign of Czar Nicholas I, in
1827, the Jews first became subject to compulsory military duty. Males between the
ages of 12 and 25 could be conscripted for 25 years to be selected by their
community organizations (Kahals). One of the major objectives of the conscription
was to remove the Jews >from the influences of Jewish society and promote their
conversion to the Orthodox Church.

Penalties were enforced against the Kahals that did not meet their quotas. In that
case, or if a selectee failed to report for service, it led to conscripting (and
even kidnapping for that purpose) males who were ordinarily exempt, such as
children as young as 8, the elderly, the infirm and persons who were the sole
support of their families. The children who were forced to serve were called
"cantonists", because the schools they were forced to attend were called "canton
schools".

In the year 1835, Nicholas I officially demarcated the boundries of the Pale,
beyond which the Jews were forbidden to live, and in 1843 the area was reduced even
further. At the end of 1844, the Kahals were abolished. thus their roles became
limited to conscription agents and tax collectors. The"basket tax" - a tax on
kosher meat - was transferred to municipal administration. An auxiliary basket tax
was levied on immovable property, business activities and bequests. There was also
a Candle Tax, a tax on Shabbat candles. The receipts were used, among other things,
to finance Crown Schools required for Jewish children.

Thus the comments made about the persons who did not pay their taxes on these five
lists can be seen to reflect these developments. In Birzai, for example, between
1835 and 1842, twenty-four persons were "recruited" (conscripted), but between
1835 and 1841, fifty-three persons were "missing" (draft dodging). In Pakruojis,
10 persons were recruited and 10 others were missing. In Krekenava, 57 persons were
recruited; none are listed as missing but 11 are listed as "costs", the meaning of
which is obscure. In Linkuva, 13 were recruited and 7 were listed as missing. Only
one person, in Pakruojis, was listed as having converted, while a father and his
three sons were listed as in prison, and one other person was listed as having been
sent to Siberia. The social conditions of the five towns are also reflected in the
comments. The comments illustrate some of the conditions of the less fortunate, the
aged, the disabled and to a lesser extent the presence of some of the more
fortunate among the persons who were not paying their taxes.

A more detailed explanation has been posted on the Member's Forum at the Panevezys
District's Shutterfly web site. The data will made available for 18 months,
exclusively to qualified members of the Panevezys District Research Group before
they are added to the All Lithuanian Data Base (ALD). For further information
please contact me.

Alphabetical lists of surnames on the five lists are available to anyone by
contacting me at the email address below.

Chag sameach l'Hanukkah and Shavuah tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@... .


Major Harold (Hans) HELDT Schlawe, Germany - Berlin - - Bombay, India #general

George J. Fogelson
 

Does anyone know Hans Heldt, an eye specialist, born in Germany and changed his
name to Harold Heldt? His parents and brother were deported to Theresienstadt in
1942. He became a major in the British army and was in Bombay in 1946. His
brother-in-law Dr. Hans Kosterwitz survived the war in Berlin.

Thanks,

George Fogelson
Redondo Beach, CA

fogelson@...


Persons Delinquent in Payment of Taxes-Panevezys 1845 #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group has added to the data at its Shutterfly web
site translations of five lists compiled in 1845 of persons found delinquent in
paying ther taxes. The lists are for the towns of Birzai (160 lines of data),
Joniskelis (12 lines of data), Krekenava (75 lines of data), Linkuva (91 lines of
data) and Pakruojis (85 lines of data). These lists on their face may not seem
significant. However, an analysis of the reasons given for non-payment and the
relationship to the period they cover, the previous two decades, also illustrate
some interesting characteristics of the Jewish communities they represent and the
conditions in which they were living. Of course, we do not know whether the
information was collected by representatives of the communities themselves or by
government officials, though either could be the "usual suspects".

The year 1845 comes at the end of a significant period, which began in 1827, in the
history of the Jews living in the Pale of Settlement. These lists are a reflection
of that period. When the Pale was originally established in 1795, the treatment of
the Jews was reasonably benign. However under the reign of Czar Nicholas I, in
1827, the Jews first became subject to compulsory military duty. Males between the
ages of 12 and 25 could be conscripted for 25 years to be selected by their
community organizations (Kahals). One of the major objectives of the conscription
was to remove the Jews >from the influences of Jewish society and promote their
conversion to the Orthodox Church.

Penalties were enforced against the Kahals that did not meet their quotas. In that
case, or if a selectee failed to report for service, it led to conscripting (and
even kidnapping for that purpose) males who were ordinarily exempt, such as
children as young as 8, the elderly, the infirm and persons who were the sole
support of their families. The children who were forced to serve were called
"cantonists", because the schools they were forced to attend were called "canton
schools".

In the year 1835, Nicholas I officially demarcated the boundries of the Pale,
beyond which the Jews were forbidden to live, and in 1843 the area was reduced even
further. At the end of 1844, the Kahals were abolished. thus their roles became
limited to conscription agents and tax collectors. The"basket tax" - a tax on
kosher meat - was transferred to municipal administration. An auxiliary basket tax
was levied on immovable property, business activities and bequests. There was also
a Candle Tax, a tax on Shabbat candles. The receipts were used, among other things,
to finance Crown Schools required for Jewish children.

Thus the comments made about the persons who did not pay their taxes on these five
lists can be seen to reflect these developments. In Birzai, for example, between
1835 and 1842, twenty-four persons were "recruited" (conscripted), but between
1835 and 1841, fifty-three persons were "missing" (draft dodging). In Pakruojis,
10 persons were recruited and 10 others were missing. In Krekenava, 57 persons were
recruited; none are listed as missing but 11 are listed as "costs", the meaning of
which is obscure. In Linkuva, 13 were recruited and 7 were listed as missing. Only
one person, in Pakruojis, was listed as having converted, while a father and his
three sons were listed as in prison, and one other person was listed as having been
sent to Siberia. The social conditions of the five towns are also reflected in the
comments. The comments illustrate some of the conditions of the less fortunate, the
aged, the disabled and to a lesser extent the presence of some of the more
fortunate among the persons who were not paying their taxes.

A more detailed explanation has been posted on the Member's Forum at the Panevezys
District's Shutterfly web site. The data will made available for 18 months,
exclusively to qualified members of the Panevezys District Research Group before
they are added to the All Lithuanian Data Base (ALD). For further information
please contact me.

Alphabetical lists of surnames on the five lists are available to anyone by
contacting me at the email address below.

Chag sameach l'Hanukkah and Shavuah tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@... .


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Major Harold (Hans) HELDT Schlawe, Germany - Berlin - - Bombay, India #general

George J. Fogelson
 

Does anyone know Hans Heldt, an eye specialist, born in Germany and changed his
name to Harold Heldt? His parents and brother were deported to Theresienstadt in
1942. He became a major in the British army and was in Bombay in 1946. His
brother-in-law Dr. Hans Kosterwitz survived the war in Berlin.

Thanks,

George Fogelson
Redondo Beach, CA

fogelson@...


Marianne Adler (nee Haim) #general

Dennis Alon <dennisj@...>
 

Dear Geners - I need your assistance.
A female cousin, born in August 1924 in Silesia and living in Breslau in 1941/42
apparently married shortly before her deportation.(She would have been around 17 or
18 years old at the time of her marriage) According to the Das Bundesarchiv she is
listed under her married name Marianne Adler (nee Haim).
Question:
1. How were Jewish marriages in 1941/42 registered at the time? The marriage must
have been officially recognized.
2. How can I possible identify the name of her husband? I have looked at Yad Vashem
and Das Bundesarchiv and have not identified anyone that could possibly be her
husband.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Dennis Allon

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JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marianne Adler (nee Haim) #general

Dennis Alon <dennisj@...>
 

Dear Geners - I need your assistance.
A female cousin, born in August 1924 in Silesia and living in Breslau in 1941/42
apparently married shortly before her deportation.(She would have been around 17 or
18 years old at the time of her marriage) According to the Das Bundesarchiv she is
listed under her married name Marianne Adler (nee Haim).
Question:
1. How were Jewish marriages in 1941/42 registered at the time? The marriage must
have been officially recognized.
2. How can I possible identify the name of her husband? I have looked at Yad Vashem
and Das Bundesarchiv and have not identified anyone that could possibly be her
husband.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Dennis Allon

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Re: DNA Puzzlement #dna

Steven Bloom
 

The most likely explanation is that the patriarch of the family had
3 daughters (or maybe 1 son and 2 daughters) , and all carried on
the surname. That is, most folks (erroneously) assume that surnames
were solely passed on by male lines. This is not the case in a number
of Jewish families, especially prior to the time when certain
governments instituted rules for surnames. So, you are seeing the
lines that correspond to men who married into the family. I cast this
as three daughters, but what I really mean is 3 different female lines
that came about a some time (or 1 male and 2 other female lines) . So
we could be talking about granddaughters, etc.

There are other possibilities, but I consider them to be unlikely in
most cases (out of wedlock births, extramarital affairs, informal
adoptions, rape, or just random usage of a new surname that didn't
really attach to that particular family, etc.).

By the way, other Jewish surname groups see similar problems, so I
think in most cases, especially where the name is concentrated
geographically, the difference in Y-DNA haplogroups of male
descendants can be explained by women carrying on the surname to men
who married into the family (that is, new branch would get the woman's
surname, but the man's DNA, thus forever having people surmise that
this man's DNA is likely to be that attached to the surname---but it
clearly isn't).

You MIGHT want to try the Family Finder autosomal DNA test. You
wouldn't necessarily be able to prove a particular relationship with
FF, but you would be able to see if your Heimlichs are close cousins
(just not along the male line).

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

I am baffled by a recent DNA study!

The hamlet of Makkoshotyka lies outside SA Ujhely in Zemplen county.
The Jewish population never exceed 15 families and around 1800, three
carried the last name Heimlich.

I would've expected therefore that those were one related family.

A recent DNA study of a dozen Heimlich male descendants with roots in
the village returned three haplogroups instead(R, B, Q).


DNA Research #DNA Re: DNA Puzzlement #dna

Steven Bloom
 

The most likely explanation is that the patriarch of the family had
3 daughters (or maybe 1 son and 2 daughters) , and all carried on
the surname. That is, most folks (erroneously) assume that surnames
were solely passed on by male lines. This is not the case in a number
of Jewish families, especially prior to the time when certain
governments instituted rules for surnames. So, you are seeing the
lines that correspond to men who married into the family. I cast this
as three daughters, but what I really mean is 3 different female lines
that came about a some time (or 1 male and 2 other female lines) . So
we could be talking about granddaughters, etc.

There are other possibilities, but I consider them to be unlikely in
most cases (out of wedlock births, extramarital affairs, informal
adoptions, rape, or just random usage of a new surname that didn't
really attach to that particular family, etc.).

By the way, other Jewish surname groups see similar problems, so I
think in most cases, especially where the name is concentrated
geographically, the difference in Y-DNA haplogroups of male
descendants can be explained by women carrying on the surname to men
who married into the family (that is, new branch would get the woman's
surname, but the man's DNA, thus forever having people surmise that
this man's DNA is likely to be that attached to the surname---but it
clearly isn't).

You MIGHT want to try the Family Finder autosomal DNA test. You
wouldn't necessarily be able to prove a particular relationship with
FF, but you would be able to see if your Heimlichs are close cousins
(just not along the male line).

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

I am baffled by a recent DNA study!

The hamlet of Makkoshotyka lies outside SA Ujhely in Zemplen county.
The Jewish population never exceed 15 families and around 1800, three
carried the last name Heimlich.

I would've expected therefore that those were one related family.

A recent DNA study of a dozen Heimlich male descendants with roots in
the village returned three haplogroups instead(R, B, Q).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passport question #general

AREACO@...
 

Dear Genners,

My husband's great uncle, who was Nationalized, Armond (Armad) ROGOFSKY traveled
to Belgium in 1927. Didn't he need a passport?

Anita Rosan Arkin
Tarzana

Searching for:AGUSHEVITZ, KRUPENIA & CHEPALAPKA Slonim & Ruzany; ARKIN Skidel,
Lunna & Yezori; GOLDBERG GONIANSKY Goniadz: GROSSAK Moscow & Sweden: ROGOFSKY
Odessa; ROSANSKY Bialystok; SALBERG ZUMBACH ZOMBEK Warsawa: HILFMAN Syracuse, New
York: KARLIN Latvia: FLUG, FLAGG Lublin, SIDERMAN Kiev


Passport question #general

AREACO@...
 

Dear Genners,

My husband's great uncle, who was Nationalized, Armond (Armad) ROGOFSKY traveled
to Belgium in 1927. Didn't he need a passport?

Anita Rosan Arkin
Tarzana

Searching for:AGUSHEVITZ, KRUPENIA & CHEPALAPKA Slonim & Ruzany; ARKIN Skidel,
Lunna & Yezori; GOLDBERG GONIANSKY Goniadz: GROSSAK Moscow & Sweden: ROGOFSKY
Odessa; ROSANSKY Bialystok; SALBERG ZUMBACH ZOMBEK Warsawa: HILFMAN Syracuse, New
York: KARLIN Latvia: FLUG, FLAGG Lublin, SIDERMAN Kiev


Re: DNA Puzzlement #dna

SVass <SVass@...>
 

In the future, please be specific in stating that the haplogroup
of the dna is Y and not mtDNA. I believe that there is an error in
that I doubt that any yDNA haplogroup B was found since it is
normally common in Central Africa and nowhere else.

In any event, I would just accept the fact that there was no recent
common paternal ancestor.

sam vass

On Dec 3, 2010, alex miller wrote:

A recent DNA study of a dozen Heimlich male descendants with
roots in the village returned three haplogroups instead(R, B, Q).


DNA Research #DNA Re: DNA Puzzlement #dna

SVass <SVass@...>
 

In the future, please be specific in stating that the haplogroup
of the dna is Y and not mtDNA. I believe that there is an error in
that I doubt that any yDNA haplogroup B was found since it is
normally common in Central Africa and nowhere else.

In any event, I would just accept the fact that there was no recent
common paternal ancestor.

sam vass

On Dec 3, 2010, alex miller wrote:

A recent DNA study of a dozen Heimlich male descendants with
roots in the village returned three haplogroups instead(R, B, Q).