Date   

Lists: Russian gov't rabbinical school students, grads? #rabbinic

Richard Pompian <rpompian@...>
 

Does anyone know of a source of lists of students and/or graduates of the
two Imperial Russian Government-sponsored rabbinical schools that trained
prospective government (or crown or official) rabbis in Lithuania? The
schools operated in Wilna and, I believe, Zhitomer >from about 1847 to 1873.
One or both may have survived beyond that time, teaching other types of
students, but the rabbinical training ended. I am aware that an Aaron
Elijah ben Aryeh Loeb Pumpianski was a Russian government rabbi in Ponevezh
and Riga (source: The Jewish Encyclopedia) , but I am particularly
interested in whether another POMPIAN or PUMPIANSKI (first name possibly
Hersch) was among the students and/or graduates. Thank you for any
information you can provide.
Richard Pompian
rpompian@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Lists: Russian gov't rabbinical school students, grads? #rabbinic

Richard Pompian <rpompian@...>
 

Does anyone know of a source of lists of students and/or graduates of the
two Imperial Russian Government-sponsored rabbinical schools that trained
prospective government (or crown or official) rabbis in Lithuania? The
schools operated in Wilna and, I believe, Zhitomer >from about 1847 to 1873.
One or both may have survived beyond that time, teaching other types of
students, but the rabbinical training ended. I am aware that an Aaron
Elijah ben Aryeh Loeb Pumpianski was a Russian government rabbi in Ponevezh
and Riga (source: The Jewish Encyclopedia) , but I am particularly
interested in whether another POMPIAN or PUMPIANSKI (first name possibly
Hersch) was among the students and/or graduates. Thank you for any
information you can provide.
Richard Pompian
rpompian@...


Sourcebooks for rabbinic genealogy #rabbinic

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

There are several classic books og Jewish genealogy which are hard to
find unless one lives close to a major Judaica library. I was
thrilled to notice that several hard-to-find treaures are now
readable at hebrewbooks.org In the list of new additions I found the
following:
The great classic Daas Kedoshim (st Petersburg 1897) Israel
Eisenstadt, family trees of the descendants of the two martyrs of
Rozhinai.
Shem Ushe'eris by Yosef Kohen-Tzedek (Cracow 1895), two books by
Israel Klausner on the history of the Vilna community and the history
of the cemetery and those buried there.
"City of Vilna' by Hillel Maggid (Steinschneider).
Kirya Ne'emana (about the city of Vilna and its personalities) by
Shmuel Yosef Finn.
Toldos Anshei Shem by David Teveli Efrati (Warsaw 1875).
Shem hagedolim Hashlishi (Part 1 & 2) by Markowitz (Vilna 1910),
The history of the Jews of Lublin by Nissenbaum (Lublin 1900).
History of the city of Novardhok /Novugrodek and its rabbis by David
Valbrinski (Warsaw 1913).
History of the city of Kaidan and its rabbis by Moshe Markowitz
(Warsaw 1913).

I noted that Kelilas Yofi by Rabbi Chaim Nathan Dembitzer has also
been added, it is a real genealogicaal treasure house. They have also
digitized the second volume with correspondence with the great
scholar David Kaufman who prepared the book of gravestones of the
ancient Prague Jewish cemetery.

Also several works by YY Grunewald about Hungarian rabbinic history.
I hope others find these interesting!
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
NYC


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Sourcebooks for rabbinic genealogy #rabbinic

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

There are several classic books og Jewish genealogy which are hard to
find unless one lives close to a major Judaica library. I was
thrilled to notice that several hard-to-find treaures are now
readable at hebrewbooks.org In the list of new additions I found the
following:
The great classic Daas Kedoshim (st Petersburg 1897) Israel
Eisenstadt, family trees of the descendants of the two martyrs of
Rozhinai.
Shem Ushe'eris by Yosef Kohen-Tzedek (Cracow 1895), two books by
Israel Klausner on the history of the Vilna community and the history
of the cemetery and those buried there.
"City of Vilna' by Hillel Maggid (Steinschneider).
Kirya Ne'emana (about the city of Vilna and its personalities) by
Shmuel Yosef Finn.
Toldos Anshei Shem by David Teveli Efrati (Warsaw 1875).
Shem hagedolim Hashlishi (Part 1 & 2) by Markowitz (Vilna 1910),
The history of the Jews of Lublin by Nissenbaum (Lublin 1900).
History of the city of Novardhok /Novugrodek and its rabbis by David
Valbrinski (Warsaw 1913).
History of the city of Kaidan and its rabbis by Moshe Markowitz
(Warsaw 1913).

I noted that Kelilas Yofi by Rabbi Chaim Nathan Dembitzer has also
been added, it is a real genealogicaal treasure house. They have also
digitized the second volume with correspondence with the great
scholar David Kaufman who prepared the book of gravestones of the
ancient Prague Jewish cemetery.

Also several works by YY Grunewald about Hungarian rabbinic history.
I hope others find these interesting!
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
NYC


A Summary of Archives in Belgium #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

In an attempt to help those who had family in Belgium at some
point before and during WWII, I'd like to summarize the primary
archives available and how to best access them (in my experience).

There are three primary archives in Belgium that I will point out:

1) The State Archives in Brussels (http://www.arch.be/), which
holds the 'Vreemdelingenpolitie persoonlijke dossiers' which are
files that were kept by a special department of the police on all
immigrants entering the country. This was a centralized archive for
the whole country, and in theory all interactions by immigrants
with all levels of government, down to the local cities, was
forwarded to this central archive.

2) The Felix Archives in Antwerp (http://www.felixarchief.be/),
which holds the local versions of the immigrant files as above. Not
all cities kept these files, but Antwerp did, and it is an important
resource. It is especially important for those families whose
relatives went to Antwerp before 1900, as the central archives in
Brussels destroyed some of the older files in 1900 to make room
for new files, and anything before 1900 may only exist in the local
archives like the Felix Archives.

3) The Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance (JMDR) is a
museum and archive set up in Mechelen, Belgium -- the location
where Belgium's Jews were collected and deported to Auschwitz in
1942. The archives hold a number of interesting collections, the
most important being the registers of all Jews in Belgium done in
1940 by the Belgian gov't, at the request of the occupying German
forces, the later registers done by Judenrat members in 1941 and
the deportation lists >from 1942. They also state on their web site
that they are in the process of digitizing the immigrant files >from
the State Archives listed above, but this may only be the records of
those deported, and may not include those people who got out of
Belgium before the Germans arrived.


So first the State Archives. These files are files that were kept by a
special department of the police on all immigrants in the country.
If your family moved >from Galicia to Belgium at some point before
the war, chances are there is a file on them here. The files can
range in size >from a single page up to dozens of pages. I have one
record that is over 80 pages. The files contain all kinds of
information, usually including the names, birth year and birth
location of the parents of the person whose file it is. The files
contain interaction with the government, so may include letters
from consulates on the person's behalf, letters >from relatives
already in Belgium, dealings with the police, etc. The files can run
well past WWII if the person continued to live in Belgium, or even
returned to visit later. If your relative lived in Belgium in the 1920s
and 1930s you can expect more than one photo of them in the
files as well. In theory, everything >from the local archives >from the
city your relative lived in should also be in these files, but as
mentioned this is not always the case, and in particular if your
family moved to Belgium before 1900 you should track down the
local archives as well.

This collection was once held in a different archive that provided
the records for free to family members, but this is no longer the
case. You need to pay for all copies of documents. If the number
of pages are small, they can be provided to you digitally online. If
the number of pages is large, they will need to mail you CDs with
the files on them. One other expense is that if you want to pay for
these copies >from outside of Belgium, they require a bank transfer,
so you'll need to factor in the international bank transfer into the
total cost. My bank charges $35 for this service, which the last
time I ordered files was well in excess of what the archive itself
was charging me for copying the files.

To access these records, you can send in a request to
archives.generales@..., and make sure to include in the
subject 'with regard to Section 5' so it gets to the right department.
When you send in a request, make sure to include as much
information about the people that you have, such the full name,
birthday, town of origin, name of spouse including maiden name,
etc. The more information you provide the better. The index to
this archive is on cards, and there are millions of them, so the
more information you provide, the easier it is for them to look up
the information. The maiden name is very important as well, as
sometimes a record might be listed under the wife's name instead
of the husband's name. I know that people have pointed out in the
past that you need to show direct descendency >from the relative to
access their records, but I have not found this to be the case.

You will be directed to an archivist working in the right department,
and they will help you to locate the files on your relatives. Once
they have been located, you can choose to order copies of the files.
One thing to keep in mind is that on the front of these file folders,
the police frequently wrote down the names and file numbers of
related people. So for example, it might list the file number of the
person's parents, or a sibling, or even occasionally a co-worker.
Before ordering copies, you should ask the archivist if they can
send you the names and files numbers lists on the front of the
files they have found, so you can determine if any of the related
files are also of interest to you. In many cases I have found people
through these related files that I didn't even think to look for at the
beginning.

Once you've come up with the list of files you want you will be
directed to the reproduction services department and you will
e-mail them the list of files you want and after a little bit of back
and forth to determine how you want them sent to you and in what
format, they will send you an e-mail with a link that links back to
their web site with an invoice for the whole order. You are
expected to transfer the amount in Euros to their bank and include
the confirmation number on the invoice in the bank transfer
information. Once they verify that they've received the funds, they
will send you the scanned files. Keep in mind that if you're going
to be ordering a lot of files and having them sent on CDs, you can
ask them to scan to TIFF instead of JPEG if you want. They don't
like it, but they will do it if pressed.


Many if not most Jews in Belgium lived in Antwerp
(Anvers/Antwerpen) and this leads to the Antwerp city archives,
called the Felix Archives. The web site is at:
http://www.felixarchief.be/ and is in Flemish (Dutch). If you don't
speak Flemish, I recommend using a tool like Google Translate. If
you use Google's Chrome browser, or if you have the Google
Toolbar installed in Firefox or IE, then you can have it
automatically translate each page as you navigate the web site,
which makes it very easy.

If you don't have Google Translate, try following these steps:

For the main page, select 'Uw huis, uw familie, uw stad' >from the
left-side menu, select 'Familieleden' and then 'Inventarissen en
indexen' and then 'Vreemdelingendossiers'. This will bring you to
a page that lists the indexes to the files they hold on immigrants
from different periods - 1840-1874, 1875-1885, 1886-1900,
1901-1915 and 1916-1930. Keep in mind that the actual archives
extends to 1970, but only the indexes up until 1930 are available,
for privacy reasons.

The reason why the archive has put these indexes online while
most archives do not do so, is because they offer no research >from
their staff at all. You cannot ask them to find records for you, you
must do it yourself. Indeed, even if you find the records, you need
to have someone physically go to the Felix Archives reading room,
get the appropriate microfilm, find the record, and either print it or
scan it to a USB hard drive. The good news is at least copying to a
USB drive is free, so if you can find someone to go, there are no
direct expenses involved.

Once you select a time period, you select a letter of the alphabet
and then it shows the different index pages for that letter. These
are JPEG images of hand-written indexes to all the files. Try
looking up married couples by both the husband's name and the
spouse's maiden name. When you find a person in the index,
write down the file number.

Once you have the file number, you need to figure out the
microfilm number that contains that file. Go to:

http://www.felixarchief.be/Unrestricted/Folder_boom_zoek.aspx?id_isad=87

and on the right side there is a link to a PDF called '142.
Vreemdelingenzaken. Inventaris'. Download that PDF and look for
the correct file range that includes your file. Starting on page 7 it
lists all the files and which microfilm they are on. For example, the
first line shows that files 1 through 59 are on Microfilm 2,234,925.
It also shows where that microfilm is located - in cabinet 3,
drawer 5. This is how you will locate the microfilm in the archive
reading room. If you look on the web site you can reserve the
microfilm for a specified time so you know you can get to work
right away when you arrive. Don't forget a USB drive.

Okay, so what if you can't go to Antwerp? They offer one
suggestion - to go to an online forum set up for people doing
research at:

http://www.geschiedenisvanantwerpen.be/forum/

Go there and select the forum called 'Opzoekingen' towards the
bottom. This is a forum where you can post a request for someone
to send you a file. You should include the file number, the
person's name, the microfilm number and its location in your
posting. I tried this and after about a week someone e-mailed me
the file I was looking for. Of course, if you have family or friends
that live in Antwerp, you might ask them to go to the archives and
make the copies for you, especially if there are a lot of files that
you're interested in, since the people on the forum are volunteers
doing it on their own time and may not be able to copy lots of files
from many different microfilms.

Now for the JMDR. The first thing to keep in mind about this
archive is that it only holds records >from 1940 when the Germans
occupied Belgium through the end of the war. If you had relatives
in Belgium before the war, but they managed to leave before 1940,
it is unlikely that you will find anything here. After the expenses
involved in the State Archives, and the difficultly accessing records
in the Felix Archives, the good news here is that they will look up
records for you here, and they will send them to you by e-mail for
free. To have a search done of these archives, you should e-mail
Ms. Laurence Schram (laurence.schram@...) and ask her to
look up relevant files on your relatives, again giving as much
information on the people as you can - including maiden names
for spouses and dates and locations of birth for everyone. She will
respond with whatever files they manage to find. In my experience
this took only a few days.


I hope this has been a helpful summary for everyone. Please post
responses on your own experiences with these archives if they
differ, and if I've missed anything please let me know.

Philip Trauring
Modi'in, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Many thanks to Philip for taking the time to
write this excellent summary.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia A Summary of Archives in Belgium #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

In an attempt to help those who had family in Belgium at some
point before and during WWII, I'd like to summarize the primary
archives available and how to best access them (in my experience).

There are three primary archives in Belgium that I will point out:

1) The State Archives in Brussels (http://www.arch.be/), which
holds the 'Vreemdelingenpolitie persoonlijke dossiers' which are
files that were kept by a special department of the police on all
immigrants entering the country. This was a centralized archive for
the whole country, and in theory all interactions by immigrants
with all levels of government, down to the local cities, was
forwarded to this central archive.

2) The Felix Archives in Antwerp (http://www.felixarchief.be/),
which holds the local versions of the immigrant files as above. Not
all cities kept these files, but Antwerp did, and it is an important
resource. It is especially important for those families whose
relatives went to Antwerp before 1900, as the central archives in
Brussels destroyed some of the older files in 1900 to make room
for new files, and anything before 1900 may only exist in the local
archives like the Felix Archives.

3) The Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance (JMDR) is a
museum and archive set up in Mechelen, Belgium -- the location
where Belgium's Jews were collected and deported to Auschwitz in
1942. The archives hold a number of interesting collections, the
most important being the registers of all Jews in Belgium done in
1940 by the Belgian gov't, at the request of the occupying German
forces, the later registers done by Judenrat members in 1941 and
the deportation lists >from 1942. They also state on their web site
that they are in the process of digitizing the immigrant files >from
the State Archives listed above, but this may only be the records of
those deported, and may not include those people who got out of
Belgium before the Germans arrived.


So first the State Archives. These files are files that were kept by a
special department of the police on all immigrants in the country.
If your family moved >from Galicia to Belgium at some point before
the war, chances are there is a file on them here. The files can
range in size >from a single page up to dozens of pages. I have one
record that is over 80 pages. The files contain all kinds of
information, usually including the names, birth year and birth
location of the parents of the person whose file it is. The files
contain interaction with the government, so may include letters
from consulates on the person's behalf, letters >from relatives
already in Belgium, dealings with the police, etc. The files can run
well past WWII if the person continued to live in Belgium, or even
returned to visit later. If your relative lived in Belgium in the 1920s
and 1930s you can expect more than one photo of them in the
files as well. In theory, everything >from the local archives >from the
city your relative lived in should also be in these files, but as
mentioned this is not always the case, and in particular if your
family moved to Belgium before 1900 you should track down the
local archives as well.

This collection was once held in a different archive that provided
the records for free to family members, but this is no longer the
case. You need to pay for all copies of documents. If the number
of pages are small, they can be provided to you digitally online. If
the number of pages is large, they will need to mail you CDs with
the files on them. One other expense is that if you want to pay for
these copies >from outside of Belgium, they require a bank transfer,
so you'll need to factor in the international bank transfer into the
total cost. My bank charges $35 for this service, which the last
time I ordered files was well in excess of what the archive itself
was charging me for copying the files.

To access these records, you can send in a request to
archives.generales@..., and make sure to include in the
subject 'with regard to Section 5' so it gets to the right department.
When you send in a request, make sure to include as much
information about the people that you have, such the full name,
birthday, town of origin, name of spouse including maiden name,
etc. The more information you provide the better. The index to
this archive is on cards, and there are millions of them, so the
more information you provide, the easier it is for them to look up
the information. The maiden name is very important as well, as
sometimes a record might be listed under the wife's name instead
of the husband's name. I know that people have pointed out in the
past that you need to show direct descendency >from the relative to
access their records, but I have not found this to be the case.

You will be directed to an archivist working in the right department,
and they will help you to locate the files on your relatives. Once
they have been located, you can choose to order copies of the files.
One thing to keep in mind is that on the front of these file folders,
the police frequently wrote down the names and file numbers of
related people. So for example, it might list the file number of the
person's parents, or a sibling, or even occasionally a co-worker.
Before ordering copies, you should ask the archivist if they can
send you the names and files numbers lists on the front of the
files they have found, so you can determine if any of the related
files are also of interest to you. In many cases I have found people
through these related files that I didn't even think to look for at the
beginning.

Once you've come up with the list of files you want you will be
directed to the reproduction services department and you will
e-mail them the list of files you want and after a little bit of back
and forth to determine how you want them sent to you and in what
format, they will send you an e-mail with a link that links back to
their web site with an invoice for the whole order. You are
expected to transfer the amount in Euros to their bank and include
the confirmation number on the invoice in the bank transfer
information. Once they verify that they've received the funds, they
will send you the scanned files. Keep in mind that if you're going
to be ordering a lot of files and having them sent on CDs, you can
ask them to scan to TIFF instead of JPEG if you want. They don't
like it, but they will do it if pressed.


Many if not most Jews in Belgium lived in Antwerp
(Anvers/Antwerpen) and this leads to the Antwerp city archives,
called the Felix Archives. The web site is at:
http://www.felixarchief.be/ and is in Flemish (Dutch). If you don't
speak Flemish, I recommend using a tool like Google Translate. If
you use Google's Chrome browser, or if you have the Google
Toolbar installed in Firefox or IE, then you can have it
automatically translate each page as you navigate the web site,
which makes it very easy.

If you don't have Google Translate, try following these steps:

For the main page, select 'Uw huis, uw familie, uw stad' >from the
left-side menu, select 'Familieleden' and then 'Inventarissen en
indexen' and then 'Vreemdelingendossiers'. This will bring you to
a page that lists the indexes to the files they hold on immigrants
from different periods - 1840-1874, 1875-1885, 1886-1900,
1901-1915 and 1916-1930. Keep in mind that the actual archives
extends to 1970, but only the indexes up until 1930 are available,
for privacy reasons.

The reason why the archive has put these indexes online while
most archives do not do so, is because they offer no research >from
their staff at all. You cannot ask them to find records for you, you
must do it yourself. Indeed, even if you find the records, you need
to have someone physically go to the Felix Archives reading room,
get the appropriate microfilm, find the record, and either print it or
scan it to a USB hard drive. The good news is at least copying to a
USB drive is free, so if you can find someone to go, there are no
direct expenses involved.

Once you select a time period, you select a letter of the alphabet
and then it shows the different index pages for that letter. These
are JPEG images of hand-written indexes to all the files. Try
looking up married couples by both the husband's name and the
spouse's maiden name. When you find a person in the index,
write down the file number.

Once you have the file number, you need to figure out the
microfilm number that contains that file. Go to:

http://www.felixarchief.be/Unrestricted/Folder_boom_zoek.aspx?id_isad=87

and on the right side there is a link to a PDF called '142.
Vreemdelingenzaken. Inventaris'. Download that PDF and look for
the correct file range that includes your file. Starting on page 7 it
lists all the files and which microfilm they are on. For example, the
first line shows that files 1 through 59 are on Microfilm 2,234,925.
It also shows where that microfilm is located - in cabinet 3,
drawer 5. This is how you will locate the microfilm in the archive
reading room. If you look on the web site you can reserve the
microfilm for a specified time so you know you can get to work
right away when you arrive. Don't forget a USB drive.

Okay, so what if you can't go to Antwerp? They offer one
suggestion - to go to an online forum set up for people doing
research at:

http://www.geschiedenisvanantwerpen.be/forum/

Go there and select the forum called 'Opzoekingen' towards the
bottom. This is a forum where you can post a request for someone
to send you a file. You should include the file number, the
person's name, the microfilm number and its location in your
posting. I tried this and after about a week someone e-mailed me
the file I was looking for. Of course, if you have family or friends
that live in Antwerp, you might ask them to go to the archives and
make the copies for you, especially if there are a lot of files that
you're interested in, since the people on the forum are volunteers
doing it on their own time and may not be able to copy lots of files
from many different microfilms.

Now for the JMDR. The first thing to keep in mind about this
archive is that it only holds records >from 1940 when the Germans
occupied Belgium through the end of the war. If you had relatives
in Belgium before the war, but they managed to leave before 1940,
it is unlikely that you will find anything here. After the expenses
involved in the State Archives, and the difficultly accessing records
in the Felix Archives, the good news here is that they will look up
records for you here, and they will send them to you by e-mail for
free. To have a search done of these archives, you should e-mail
Ms. Laurence Schram (laurence.schram@...) and ask her to
look up relevant files on your relatives, again giving as much
information on the people as you can - including maiden names
for spouses and dates and locations of birth for everyone. She will
respond with whatever files they manage to find. In my experience
this took only a few days.


I hope this has been a helpful summary for everyone. Please post
responses on your own experiences with these archives if they
differ, and if I've missed anything please let me know.

Philip Trauring
Modi'in, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Many thanks to Philip for taking the time to
write this excellent summary.


16mm Postcards: Home Movies of American Jewish Visitors to 1930s Poland #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

The "16 mm Postcards" exhibition at the Center for Jewish History draws
from 26 films >from the collection that resides in the archives of YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research. You can watch the full, original
versions of these 26 films at this link: =20

http://www.cjh.org/16mmPostcards/Original_Films.php

These films were digitized under a grant to the Center for Jewish
History by the Righteous Persons Foundation.

Locations in Poland:
Krakow
Kalushin (East of Warsaw)
Zareby Koscielne (Zaromb) (Northeast of Warsaw)
Radom (Northeast of Lublin)
Lodz
Swislocz (East of Bialystok)
Minsk Mazowiecki (Novominsk, east of Warsaw)
Kedainiai (Northeast of Vilnius)
Boryslaw (Southwest of Warsaw)
Tishevits (Southeast of Lublin)
Keidainiai or Ukmerge (northeast of Vilnius)
Horodok (Grodek, Southeast of Lublin)
Horodok (Grodek, Southeast of Lublin)
Sedziszow (north of Krakow)
Unknown
Kamionka (South of Warsaw), Skidl (Northeast of Bialystok)
Skidl (Northeast of Bialystok), Skierniewice, Warsaw
Osmiany (Oshmyany or Ashmyany, Southeast of Vilnius)
Countryside near Libowne (Luboml, east of Chelm)
Warsaw, Lodz, Gdynia, Vilna
Lodz, Gdynia, Vilna
Kolbuszowa, Sokolow Malopolski, Rzeszow
Lodz, Orzorkow, Leczyczna
Lodz, Leningrad, Moscow, Berlin, Paris
Osmiany (Oshmyany or Ashmyany, Southeast of Vilnius)
Kurow (Northeast of Lublin)

--
Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@...

Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html

Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


JRI Poland #Poland 16mm Postcards: Home Movies of American Jewish Visitors to 1930s Poland #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

The "16 mm Postcards" exhibition at the Center for Jewish History draws
from 26 films >from the collection that resides in the archives of YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research. You can watch the full, original
versions of these 26 films at this link: =20

http://www.cjh.org/16mmPostcards/Original_Films.php

These films were digitized under a grant to the Center for Jewish
History by the Righteous Persons Foundation.

Locations in Poland:
Krakow
Kalushin (East of Warsaw)
Zareby Koscielne (Zaromb) (Northeast of Warsaw)
Radom (Northeast of Lublin)
Lodz
Swislocz (East of Bialystok)
Minsk Mazowiecki (Novominsk, east of Warsaw)
Kedainiai (Northeast of Vilnius)
Boryslaw (Southwest of Warsaw)
Tishevits (Southeast of Lublin)
Keidainiai or Ukmerge (northeast of Vilnius)
Horodok (Grodek, Southeast of Lublin)
Horodok (Grodek, Southeast of Lublin)
Sedziszow (north of Krakow)
Unknown
Kamionka (South of Warsaw), Skidl (Northeast of Bialystok)
Skidl (Northeast of Bialystok), Skierniewice, Warsaw
Osmiany (Oshmyany or Ashmyany, Southeast of Vilnius)
Countryside near Libowne (Luboml, east of Chelm)
Warsaw, Lodz, Gdynia, Vilna
Lodz, Gdynia, Vilna
Kolbuszowa, Sokolow Malopolski, Rzeszow
Lodz, Orzorkow, Leczyczna
Lodz, Leningrad, Moscow, Berlin, Paris
Osmiany (Oshmyany or Ashmyany, Southeast of Vilnius)
Kurow (Northeast of Lublin)

--
Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@...

Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html

Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html

Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


New book: The Holocaust Sites of Europe #poland

Martin Winstone
 

Dear friends,

I am the author of a new book which I hope will interest JRI-Poland members.
˜The Holocaust Sites of Europe" is both a work of historical reference and a
travel guide. It covers 19 countries and includes not just camps and massacre
sites but also major cities. it is therefore partly also a guide to Jewish
heritage sites. Sir Martin Gilbert has provided a foreword and 34 maps. The
scale of the book means that I had to be selective in the locations included
but Poland obviously has by far the longest chapter. The detailed entries
cover Warsaw, Lodz, Krakow, Lublin and Bialystok as well as 11 camps
(including lesser-known ones such as Trawniki and Poniatowa) and the Izbica
transit ghetto.

There are briefer entries for several other sites including Wlodawa, Chelm,
Kazimierz Dolny, Zamosc, Tarnow and Kielce. Other chapters include detailed
entries for Vilna and Lvov. The book was published in the UK in June and in
the USA last week. For more details see:
http://us.macmillan.com/theholocaustsitesofeurope

If anyone would like any more information about the book, or advice on
visiting sites in Europe, please do not hesitate to contact me directly.

I would like and to wish all readers Shana Tova.

Martin Winstone
Oxford, UK

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This message constitutes the one-time allowable
announcement of a commercial product that is of interest and
importance to the readers of this list.


JRI Poland #Poland New book: The Holocaust Sites of Europe #poland

Martin Winstone
 

Dear friends,

I am the author of a new book which I hope will interest JRI-Poland members.
˜The Holocaust Sites of Europe" is both a work of historical reference and a
travel guide. It covers 19 countries and includes not just camps and massacre
sites but also major cities. it is therefore partly also a guide to Jewish
heritage sites. Sir Martin Gilbert has provided a foreword and 34 maps. The
scale of the book means that I had to be selective in the locations included
but Poland obviously has by far the longest chapter. The detailed entries
cover Warsaw, Lodz, Krakow, Lublin and Bialystok as well as 11 camps
(including lesser-known ones such as Trawniki and Poniatowa) and the Izbica
transit ghetto.

There are briefer entries for several other sites including Wlodawa, Chelm,
Kazimierz Dolny, Zamosc, Tarnow and Kielce. Other chapters include detailed
entries for Vilna and Lvov. The book was published in the UK in June and in
the USA last week. For more details see:
http://us.macmillan.com/theholocaustsitesofeurope

If anyone would like any more information about the book, or advice on
visiting sites in Europe, please do not hesitate to contact me directly.

I would like and to wish all readers Shana Tova.

Martin Winstone
Oxford, UK

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This message constitutes the one-time allowable
announcement of a commercial product that is of interest and
importance to the readers of this list.


segals from rietavas lithuania-all spellings #lithuania

Glenn Segal <glenn.segal@...>
 

I also have hit a brick wall although I consider myself fortunate to have
found 5 of the 6 people and live relatives of all except the first and
oldest of these 6 brothers.

If you google RTV-1895, the segals all come up on the all Russia census
from rietavas. The only person and his family I can't locate or find info
on is the oldest son named rafel segal and his wife leia and their 8
children.

I would appreciate any info to the above e mail--thanks in advance

glenn segal-boynton beach fl


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania segals from rietavas lithuania-all spellings #lithuania

Glenn Segal <glenn.segal@...>
 

I also have hit a brick wall although I consider myself fortunate to have
found 5 of the 6 people and live relatives of all except the first and
oldest of these 6 brothers.

If you google RTV-1895, the segals all come up on the all Russia census
from rietavas. The only person and his family I can't locate or find info
on is the oldest son named rafel segal and his wife leia and their 8
children.

I would appreciate any info to the above e mail--thanks in advance

glenn segal-boynton beach fl


GAMBURG/GAMS #lithuania

Josie Barnett
 

With regard to Paulette Bronstein's posting on Sunday, I wish to offer the
following comments on her Gamburg/Gams family, both in a personal capacity
and as the Disna District Coordinator.

I took a look at the 1875 Male Family Members Revision List for Disna and
found several entries which I think might possibly be Paulette's
gggrandfather. I found a Gens family with Simon aged 59 plus two sons Mikhel
21 and Berke 17. On a different line I also saw the Kants family with Leyba
aged 18 son of Itzhak. As I doubt whether anyone went under the name of Louis
in Lithuania, the original name could have been Leyba or even something
completely different. Louis was meant to be an 'American/Western name'.

from my own personal experience when we look at Revision lists we have to
take into consideration that there could be variations in the translation
and try and be as creative as possible. Our translators are doing a
wonderful job but they are dealing with very old documents and discrepancies
take place. This I know for a fact regarding my own family research in
Sharkovschinna.

Regarding the marriage of cousins, this was very normal. For example my own
paternal grandparents had the same surname and were second cousins.

The Disna District Research Group of Litvaksig still has important material
waiting to be translated. As we are only a small group we need both new
members and donations in order to continue in this important work. You can
find more about us at http://disna.shutterfly.com/ or through
www.litvaksig.org/contribute or write to me at hedakal@...

Wishing everyone a very Happy and Successful New Year.

Josie Barnett
Jerusalem, Israel (formerly UK)

Researching: Hidekel/Chedakel of Sharkovschinna Levene/Hanovitch
(somewhere along the Polish Prussian Border) and Holts/Woods Nowy Dwor
near Warsaw


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania GAMBURG/GAMS #lithuania

Josie Barnett
 

With regard to Paulette Bronstein's posting on Sunday, I wish to offer the
following comments on her Gamburg/Gams family, both in a personal capacity
and as the Disna District Coordinator.

I took a look at the 1875 Male Family Members Revision List for Disna and
found several entries which I think might possibly be Paulette's
gggrandfather. I found a Gens family with Simon aged 59 plus two sons Mikhel
21 and Berke 17. On a different line I also saw the Kants family with Leyba
aged 18 son of Itzhak. As I doubt whether anyone went under the name of Louis
in Lithuania, the original name could have been Leyba or even something
completely different. Louis was meant to be an 'American/Western name'.

from my own personal experience when we look at Revision lists we have to
take into consideration that there could be variations in the translation
and try and be as creative as possible. Our translators are doing a
wonderful job but they are dealing with very old documents and discrepancies
take place. This I know for a fact regarding my own family research in
Sharkovschinna.

Regarding the marriage of cousins, this was very normal. For example my own
paternal grandparents had the same surname and were second cousins.

The Disna District Research Group of Litvaksig still has important material
waiting to be translated. As we are only a small group we need both new
members and donations in order to continue in this important work. You can
find more about us at http://disna.shutterfly.com/ or through
www.litvaksig.org/contribute or write to me at hedakal@...

Wishing everyone a very Happy and Successful New Year.

Josie Barnett
Jerusalem, Israel (formerly UK)

Researching: Hidekel/Chedakel of Sharkovschinna Levene/Hanovitch
(somewhere along the Polish Prussian Border) and Holts/Woods Nowy Dwor
near Warsaw


FW: Russian Translation Four Documents #poland

Maxwald
 

Russian to English translation needed for the following Family member's
documents on Viewmate.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16496
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16494
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16493

Please respond directly to max.wald@...

Researcher 154536
Max Wald

Seeking: Perkelwald,Lewartowski,Mittelberg,Nuchumowicz,Alter,Yustman


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland FW: Russian Translation Four Documents #poland

Maxwald
 

Russian to English translation needed for the following Family member's
documents on Viewmate.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16496
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16494
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16493

Please respond directly to max.wald@...

Researcher 154536
Max Wald

Seeking: Perkelwald,Lewartowski,Mittelberg,Nuchumowicz,Alter,Yustman


Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, #102 #france

Ernest Kallmann
 

Revue 102. Summary

A genealogical enquiry >from Metz to the Rhine valley

Pascal FAUSTINI investigates the surnames Blad, Blatt and Platt,
suspecting they share the same roots. Starting in Metz with Fratie,
daughter of Amram Moshe Blad, who signs the her children?s premarital
agreements >from 1738 onward, the search continues via Rixheim in Alsace,
Worms, Frankfurt and finally Bingen. The author makes use of all
available written and printed sources and finally of the tombstone
inscriptions of the Bingen cemetery. Thus he traces the Blatt/Blad/Platt
family back to a Kalman Salomon Blad dead on March 7, 1653 in Bingen.
Exploiting Ele Toledot, now online on the Salomon Stinheim Institut
website, further namesakes, probably also originating in Bingen, can be
found, up to individuals living in the 16^th century.

The posterity of Raphaël Vorms >from Bionville, (Part three)

Louis VORMS and Guy WORMS close their 3-part article on the
descendency of Raphaël Vorms >from Bionville, their common ancestor born
in Bionville on Nied ( Moselle ) and dead there in 1801. The list of his
descendants, limited to those deceased during the early 20th century,
contains several hundred entries.

More about Claude Levi-Strauss

Thanks to the Paris vital records recently put on-line, Guy WORMS
publishes his latest discoveries and corrections about the ancestors of
Claude Lévi-Strauss, the well known French ethnologist recently deceased.

The Jews of Constantine (Algeria) at the beginning of the
French presence (1837)

Philippe DANAN

The French army conquered the last Algerian town, Constantine, in 1837.
The local 3.000 head Jewish community was orthodox and pro-French. In a
first part the author shows a number of documents to counter the myth of
Jews fighting side by side with the Arabs against the French Army. In
the second part he describes the specific way in which vital event
recording was introduced, giving evidence of the rear guard fight the
indigenous rabbis tried to slow down assimilation. The chief rabbi, for
instance, was present at the civil marriage to testify that nothing
against Jewish Law was provided in the agreements and records.

Death records of people deported >from France during the Holocaust

Eve Line BLUM has already approached the subject of missing death
records for people deported >from France (whether Jewish or not).
However, the situation has not improved. According to the French Civil
Code people without such a certificate cannot be considered as being dead.

What is the origin of the name Lazare?

Eliane ROOS SCHUHL

Does the given name and/or surname Lazare come >from Eleazar, Aaron's son
and Moshe's nephew; or >from Eliezer, Abraham's servant who has been in
charge of finding a spouse for his son Isaac?

Please direct inquiries or comments ONLY to office@...

Ernest Kallmann
Suburban Paris


French SIG #France Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, #102 #france

Ernest Kallmann
 

Revue 102. Summary

A genealogical enquiry >from Metz to the Rhine valley

Pascal FAUSTINI investigates the surnames Blad, Blatt and Platt,
suspecting they share the same roots. Starting in Metz with Fratie,
daughter of Amram Moshe Blad, who signs the her children?s premarital
agreements >from 1738 onward, the search continues via Rixheim in Alsace,
Worms, Frankfurt and finally Bingen. The author makes use of all
available written and printed sources and finally of the tombstone
inscriptions of the Bingen cemetery. Thus he traces the Blatt/Blad/Platt
family back to a Kalman Salomon Blad dead on March 7, 1653 in Bingen.
Exploiting Ele Toledot, now online on the Salomon Stinheim Institut
website, further namesakes, probably also originating in Bingen, can be
found, up to individuals living in the 16^th century.

The posterity of Raphaël Vorms >from Bionville, (Part three)

Louis VORMS and Guy WORMS close their 3-part article on the
descendency of Raphaël Vorms >from Bionville, their common ancestor born
in Bionville on Nied ( Moselle ) and dead there in 1801. The list of his
descendants, limited to those deceased during the early 20th century,
contains several hundred entries.

More about Claude Levi-Strauss

Thanks to the Paris vital records recently put on-line, Guy WORMS
publishes his latest discoveries and corrections about the ancestors of
Claude Lévi-Strauss, the well known French ethnologist recently deceased.

The Jews of Constantine (Algeria) at the beginning of the
French presence (1837)

Philippe DANAN

The French army conquered the last Algerian town, Constantine, in 1837.
The local 3.000 head Jewish community was orthodox and pro-French. In a
first part the author shows a number of documents to counter the myth of
Jews fighting side by side with the Arabs against the French Army. In
the second part he describes the specific way in which vital event
recording was introduced, giving evidence of the rear guard fight the
indigenous rabbis tried to slow down assimilation. The chief rabbi, for
instance, was present at the civil marriage to testify that nothing
against Jewish Law was provided in the agreements and records.

Death records of people deported >from France during the Holocaust

Eve Line BLUM has already approached the subject of missing death
records for people deported >from France (whether Jewish or not).
However, the situation has not improved. According to the French Civil
Code people without such a certificate cannot be considered as being dead.

What is the origin of the name Lazare?

Eliane ROOS SCHUHL

Does the given name and/or surname Lazare come >from Eleazar, Aaron's son
and Moshe's nephew; or >from Eliezer, Abraham's servant who has been in
charge of finding a spouse for his son Isaac?

Please direct inquiries or comments ONLY to office@...

Ernest Kallmann
Suburban Paris


recipe for "Kropen" #romania

nk
 

Hello,
My maternal grandmother, Zisel Karlik, came >from Kitay Gorod, Ukraine.
She made a dessert pastry called "Kropen" for Rosh Hashanah. This
consisted of sliced apples covered in a pastry dough. After baking,
the pastry was dipped in honey. Has anyone heard of this pastry and
does anyone have a recipe?

Thanks for your attention. Shanah Tovah,

Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Looking for:
KARLIK Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
GREENBERG Khomne Brod, Ukraine, Boston Area in shoe industry
ZELBOVITCH Ponidel, Lithuania
ZYLBER Ponidel, Lithuania
KORB Skopishok, Lithuania
LEVIN Skopishok, Lithuania
ROSENFELD Paterson, NJ
LEFKOWITZ Paterson, NJ
SCHOENFELD Flushing, NY


Romania SIG #Romania recipe for "Kropen" #romania

nk
 

Hello,
My maternal grandmother, Zisel Karlik, came >from Kitay Gorod, Ukraine.
She made a dessert pastry called "Kropen" for Rosh Hashanah. This
consisted of sliced apples covered in a pastry dough. After baking,
the pastry was dipped in honey. Has anyone heard of this pastry and
does anyone have a recipe?

Thanks for your attention. Shanah Tovah,

Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Looking for:
KARLIK Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
GREENBERG Khomne Brod, Ukraine, Boston Area in shoe industry
ZELBOVITCH Ponidel, Lithuania
ZYLBER Ponidel, Lithuania
KORB Skopishok, Lithuania
LEVIN Skopishok, Lithuania
ROSENFELD Paterson, NJ
LEFKOWITZ Paterson, NJ
SCHOENFELD Flushing, NY