Date   

Kaunas Lithuania Birth Records #general

Howard Margol
 

The English translation of the city of Kaunas birth records, 1886-1890,
has been received - a total of 2,735 records. They are ready to be
distributed to qualified contributors. These birth records are
somewhat unusual in a number of ways.

(1) In a large percentage of the cases, the mother's maiden name
and her father's name is included.
(2) Many of the fathers were registered in towns other than Kaunas.
Most of the towns in Lithuania are listed as the place of registration
so these birth records are of interest to not only Kaunas researchers
but others as well.
(3) An unusual percentage of those born in Kaunas, died one to three
years later. The exact date of their death is given so, in the same
record, you have the date of birth as well as the date of death.
(4) An unusual number of twins were born in Kaunas during that period.
(5) An unusual number of illegitimate births occurred in Kaunas during
that period. It may indicate that unmarried females had their babies
born in Kaunas, rather than in the town where they lived, in order to
avoid the embarrassment of an unwed mother.
(6) A number of unusual events were recorded:
Semen KOPELOV, born 28 August, 1886, was baptized in Warsaw in 1914.
Tsirel SOKOLEVSKI, son of Feival, Born 1890, became a Catholic in 1907.
Abram GRASS, son of Gena Chana, was an illegitimate child born 28 October,
1889. The mother was registered in Paberze in the Vilnius district.
Abram was born in the Grodno prison and circumcised in the Kaunas prison.

About 90% of all of the Kaunas birth, marriage, divorce, and death records
have now been translated, numbering many thousands of records. If you make
a minimum contribution of $100, you will receive all of the records in
addition to the remaining records as they are translated. If 15 or 20 donors
make a contribution, we should be able to get all remaining records
translated. If you are a previous contributor, please try and find room in your
budget to make another contribution.

To contribute, go to http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity. Feel
free to use your credit card as the site is secure. Be sure and designate your
contribution is for Kaunas vital records.

After you make your contribution, you will automatically receive a
receipt. Please forward a coy of your receipt to Aaron Roetenberg, Kaunas vital
records coordinator - aroetenberg@... so he can send you the records.

Howard Margol
Coordinator for Vital Records Acquisition


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kaunas Lithuania Birth Records #general

Howard Margol
 

The English translation of the city of Kaunas birth records, 1886-1890,
has been received - a total of 2,735 records. They are ready to be
distributed to qualified contributors. These birth records are
somewhat unusual in a number of ways.

(1) In a large percentage of the cases, the mother's maiden name
and her father's name is included.
(2) Many of the fathers were registered in towns other than Kaunas.
Most of the towns in Lithuania are listed as the place of registration
so these birth records are of interest to not only Kaunas researchers
but others as well.
(3) An unusual percentage of those born in Kaunas, died one to three
years later. The exact date of their death is given so, in the same
record, you have the date of birth as well as the date of death.
(4) An unusual number of twins were born in Kaunas during that period.
(5) An unusual number of illegitimate births occurred in Kaunas during
that period. It may indicate that unmarried females had their babies
born in Kaunas, rather than in the town where they lived, in order to
avoid the embarrassment of an unwed mother.
(6) A number of unusual events were recorded:
Semen KOPELOV, born 28 August, 1886, was baptized in Warsaw in 1914.
Tsirel SOKOLEVSKI, son of Feival, Born 1890, became a Catholic in 1907.
Abram GRASS, son of Gena Chana, was an illegitimate child born 28 October,
1889. The mother was registered in Paberze in the Vilnius district.
Abram was born in the Grodno prison and circumcised in the Kaunas prison.

About 90% of all of the Kaunas birth, marriage, divorce, and death records
have now been translated, numbering many thousands of records. If you make
a minimum contribution of $100, you will receive all of the records in
addition to the remaining records as they are translated. If 15 or 20 donors
make a contribution, we should be able to get all remaining records
translated. If you are a previous contributor, please try and find room in your
budget to make another contribution.

To contribute, go to http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity. Feel
free to use your credit card as the site is secure. Be sure and designate your
contribution is for Kaunas vital records.

After you make your contribution, you will automatically receive a
receipt. Please forward a coy of your receipt to Aaron Roetenberg, Kaunas vital
records coordinator - aroetenberg@... so he can send you the records.

Howard Margol
Coordinator for Vital Records Acquisition


Photographs of Gravestones #belarus

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Hi All,

I have read numerous posts requesting photographs >from distant cemeteries.
I'd like to share two techniques which have worked for me.

1. Telephone the cemetery and talk to someone in the office. Ask that
person for the grave location(s) of the deceased, then ask if he/she will
take a picture of the gravestone(s). Of course, you will offer to pay for
the photograph(s). Needless to say, if you want more than a few pictures,
this method can become costly -- and time consuming for the cemetery
personnel who may agree to take the pictures reluctantly. Even after that
person
agrees, you may have to telephone a few times as a reminder.

2. This is my preferred method. Contact the cemetery and get all the
information about the gravesites. Then ask the person with whom you are
speaking if you may send a new, unused disposable camera and a stamped,
self-addressed envelope for return of the camera. When I did this, I went
to my local post office and purchased two padded envelopes. I put the
camera in the envelope which I had addressed to the cemetery. I also
included a typed list of the gravestones I wanted photographed, along with
the location of each grave. With the help of the postal clerk, who figured
out how much postage would be necessary to mail the camera back to me, I
then added the stamped, self-addressed padded envelope to the envelope which
already contained the camera and the typed list of names and grave
locations.

A short time after mailing the camera to the cemetery, I telephoned the
office to ask if it had arrived. That call served two purposes: It
confirmed to me that the package had reached its destination, and it was a
reminder to the cemetery personnel to take the photographs. I had to wait a
period of time -- I guess picture-taking is not high up on the list of their
priorities -- but the method did work! And the only cost to me was the
price of the camera, the postage in both directions, and developing the
film!

A final thought: I did this in the United States: Pennsylvania to New Jersey
and back to Pennsylvania. I do not know whether it would be helpful outside
the United States.

Shelda Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania USA

Researching: >from Mogilev gubernia, Belarus: BACHIN, SHAKHNOVITZ (or
alternate spellings); >from Galicia, Ukraine: APTOWITZER, APTOWITZ; From
Poland: LUDZKI/LODZKI, KARTOWSKI (or alternate spellings), SZAJMAN, NAJFELD,
GERZBERG/HERZBERG


Re: Knarchenhour Name Translation in UK #unitedkingdom

mbenedict51@...
 

If the name is German-based, then the beginning sounds plausible,
but the ending (-hour) is more likely to have been something like "-auer", "ahr",
"haar" or "-ur". Having said that, the beginning doesn't seem like anything in
particular, so could also be adrift.

It may be a question of thinking which region they came in at, and what the
original name might have been if that's the local pronunciation-guess.

Mary
SW Herts


Belarus SIG #Belarus Photographs of Gravestones #belarus

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Hi All,

I have read numerous posts requesting photographs >from distant cemeteries.
I'd like to share two techniques which have worked for me.

1. Telephone the cemetery and talk to someone in the office. Ask that
person for the grave location(s) of the deceased, then ask if he/she will
take a picture of the gravestone(s). Of course, you will offer to pay for
the photograph(s). Needless to say, if you want more than a few pictures,
this method can become costly -- and time consuming for the cemetery
personnel who may agree to take the pictures reluctantly. Even after that
person
agrees, you may have to telephone a few times as a reminder.

2. This is my preferred method. Contact the cemetery and get all the
information about the gravesites. Then ask the person with whom you are
speaking if you may send a new, unused disposable camera and a stamped,
self-addressed envelope for return of the camera. When I did this, I went
to my local post office and purchased two padded envelopes. I put the
camera in the envelope which I had addressed to the cemetery. I also
included a typed list of the gravestones I wanted photographed, along with
the location of each grave. With the help of the postal clerk, who figured
out how much postage would be necessary to mail the camera back to me, I
then added the stamped, self-addressed padded envelope to the envelope which
already contained the camera and the typed list of names and grave
locations.

A short time after mailing the camera to the cemetery, I telephoned the
office to ask if it had arrived. That call served two purposes: It
confirmed to me that the package had reached its destination, and it was a
reminder to the cemetery personnel to take the photographs. I had to wait a
period of time -- I guess picture-taking is not high up on the list of their
priorities -- but the method did work! And the only cost to me was the
price of the camera, the postage in both directions, and developing the
film!

A final thought: I did this in the United States: Pennsylvania to New Jersey
and back to Pennsylvania. I do not know whether it would be helpful outside
the United States.

Shelda Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania USA

Researching: >from Mogilev gubernia, Belarus: BACHIN, SHAKHNOVITZ (or
alternate spellings); >from Galicia, Ukraine: APTOWITZER, APTOWITZ; From
Poland: LUDZKI/LODZKI, KARTOWSKI (or alternate spellings), SZAJMAN, NAJFELD,
GERZBERG/HERZBERG


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: Knarchenhour Name Translation in UK #unitedkingdom

mbenedict51@...
 

If the name is German-based, then the beginning sounds plausible,
but the ending (-hour) is more likely to have been something like "-auer", "ahr",
"haar" or "-ur". Having said that, the beginning doesn't seem like anything in
particular, so could also be adrift.

It may be a question of thinking which region they came in at, and what the
original name might have been if that's the local pronunciation-guess.

Mary
SW Herts


IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter #1: Read All About It! #unitedkingdom

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The first IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter is out. If it hasn't
already come to your virtual mailbox, you can read it at:

http://eepurl.com/epMd

Exciting developments are taking place daily and the newsletter is the
way to keep informed about plans for 2010. If you haven't subscribed, you
can do so at:

http://www.jgsla2010.com/about/sign-up-for-the-announcements-newsletter/

Mark your calendars now to attend >from Sunday, July 11th through
Friday, July 16th.
We are also scheduling a variety of optional pre-conference activities
which we will announce soon.

Early news is that Arthur Kurzweil will be our "Genealogist in
Residence" for the entire conference week. Author of ">from Generation
to Generation," and one of America's foremost experts in Jewish
genealogy, Kurzweil will be giving lectures and teaching classes,
along with performing his show "Searching for God in a Magic Shop," a
unique exploration of the world of illusions, offering profound ideas
of Jewish thought.

We're planning an inspiring, opening Sunday where you can immerse
yourself in an assortment of beginner's workshops and stroll through a
SIG "Market Square" to view a cornucopia of regional special interest
groups, get first-hand help with your research questions and meet the
foreign archivists and experts in overseas research who will be
lecturing later in the week. There will also be demonstrations of
shtetl crafts like weaving and needlework, along with cooking
workshops, films and more.

The conference hotel, the JW Marriott at L.A Live, is due to open in a
few months, but it's already looking quite spiffy. Still...it's the
participants filling the vast space that will bring this conference to
life, so start making plans now to attend >from July 11-16, 2010.

If you've got a talent, expertise or topic to share, consider submitting a
lecture proposal when the call for papers opens on November 15th. If
you are a vendor or exhibitor, contact us for details on how you can
participate. Our home page: www.jgsla2010.com is the portal to a
world of conference information, FAQs, and program highlights.
(And don't forget to join our Facebook page and check out our blog.

We look forward to celebrating 30 years of IAJGS conferences with you
this summer!

Pamela Weisberger
IAJGS 2010 Conference Co-Chair
pamela@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter #1: Read All About It! #unitedkingdom

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The first IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter is out. If it hasn't
already come to your virtual mailbox, you can read it at:

http://eepurl.com/epMd

Exciting developments are taking place daily and the newsletter is the
way to keep informed about plans for 2010. If you haven't subscribed, you
can do so at:

http://www.jgsla2010.com/about/sign-up-for-the-announcements-newsletter/

Mark your calendars now to attend >from Sunday, July 11th through
Friday, July 16th.
We are also scheduling a variety of optional pre-conference activities
which we will announce soon.

Early news is that Arthur Kurzweil will be our "Genealogist in
Residence" for the entire conference week. Author of ">from Generation
to Generation," and one of America's foremost experts in Jewish
genealogy, Kurzweil will be giving lectures and teaching classes,
along with performing his show "Searching for God in a Magic Shop," a
unique exploration of the world of illusions, offering profound ideas
of Jewish thought.

We're planning an inspiring, opening Sunday where you can immerse
yourself in an assortment of beginner's workshops and stroll through a
SIG "Market Square" to view a cornucopia of regional special interest
groups, get first-hand help with your research questions and meet the
foreign archivists and experts in overseas research who will be
lecturing later in the week. There will also be demonstrations of
shtetl crafts like weaving and needlework, along with cooking
workshops, films and more.

The conference hotel, the JW Marriott at L.A Live, is due to open in a
few months, but it's already looking quite spiffy. Still...it's the
participants filling the vast space that will bring this conference to
life, so start making plans now to attend >from July 11-16, 2010.

If you've got a talent, expertise or topic to share, consider submitting a
lecture proposal when the call for papers opens on November 15th. If
you are a vendor or exhibitor, contact us for details on how you can
participate. Our home page: www.jgsla2010.com is the portal to a
world of conference information, FAQs, and program highlights.
(And don't forget to join our Facebook page and check out our blog.

We look forward to celebrating 30 years of IAJGS conferences with you
this summer!

Pamela Weisberger
IAJGS 2010 Conference Co-Chair
pamela@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Argentina contact number #ukraine

hbquinn@...
 

Hello group,
I also tried several variations of the e-mail address and they
did not work, but if anyone does figure it out, I would love having the
information. My g-uncle immigrated >from Belozerka Ukraine to Argentina
where they changed his name >from Hyman Gedansky to Jaime Gadansky. I have
some of his papers after he arrived there and then after a few years he
moved to Santiago Chile where I visited with his grandson. Please try to
find a way to get a contact number. Maybe some kind person in Argentina
could look in the phonebook there, call the Argentine Immigration Dept. and
figure this out for us.

Harriett

RESEARCHING: GEDANSKY (all variations of spelling)of Belozerka Ukraine,
AVERBACK BAKER, BECKER, BEKER, PASTERNAK, VEISBLACH, GOLDENBERG also of
Belozerka area, GOLDBERG, GREENBERG, FEINSTEIN, ARTENSTEIN, BOCHES,


Argentina contact number #ukraine

hbquinn@...
 

Hello group,
I also tried several variations of the e-mail address and they
did not work, but if anyone does figure it out, I would love having the
information. My g-uncle immigrated >from Belozerka Ukraine to Argentina
where they changed his name >from Hyman Gedansky to Jaime Gadansky. I have
some of his papers after he arrived there and then after a few years he
moved to Santiago Chile where I visited with his grandson. Please try to
find a way to get a contact number. Maybe some kind person in Argentina
could look in the phonebook there, call the Argentine Immigration Dept. and
figure this out for us.

Harriett

RESEARCHING: GEDANSKY (all variations of spelling)of Belozerka Ukraine,
AVERBACK BAKER, BECKER, BEKER, PASTERNAK, VEISBLACH, GOLDENBERG also of
Belozerka area, GOLDBERG, GREENBERG, FEINSTEIN, ARTENSTEIN, BOCHES,


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Immigration Records of Argentina #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hello,

The immigration records in Argentina are at the Immigration Museum in
Buenos Aires (http://www.mininterior.gov.ar/migraciones/museo/index.html)

The access to the museum is free and there you can consult personally
the database (there's an employee to whom you request the different
names and search for you). The research is done in a database (no access
to original records) and not all records are available (they work on it
but slowlyn and plenty of records have been lost). This concerns only
immigrations through Buenos Aires Port (the major immigration port in
Argentina).

The research is done personally (no email, fax or internet) and it cost
about 2 pesos (50 US cents) per name researched.

I knew a reliable person who did genealogic researchs (not only
immigration, but census, cemeteries, birth, etc). His site is
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/ where there's a contact mail
address. I don't know if he continues doing researchs but it's
worth to contact him.

If you don't have an answer to that mail, I can give you his personal one.

Hope this helps and good luck in your researchs.

Ariel PARKANSKY
(Buenos Aires, Argentina / Paris, France)
http://www.thefamilytree.com.ar (www_dot_thefamilytree_dot_com_dot_ar)

Kishinev, Tighina: PARKANSKY, LECHNER Kishinev, Calarasi: DUBIN,
CHERNIAVSKY, FISMAN Odessa: VAISBEN, HOCHMANN, SCHARTZ
Kiev, Odessa, Neporotovo, Podolia: ERLICHMAN, AISENGART
Kiliya: SCHWARZBERG Bessarabia, Akkerman, Odessa: GLASS, KERSCHNER,
ZEIGNER Chichelnik: ZUKERMAN, LASHOCK Podolia: SITCOF, MONDRIK, LERMAN


Re: Immigration Records of Argentina #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hello,

The immigration records in Argentina are at the Immigration Museum in
Buenos Aires (http://www.mininterior.gov.ar/migraciones/museo/index.html)

The access to the museum is free and there you can consult personally
the database (there's an employee to whom you request the different
names and search for you). The research is done in a database (no access
to original records) and not all records are available (they work on it
but slowlyn and plenty of records have been lost). This concerns only
immigrations through Buenos Aires Port (the major immigration port in
Argentina).

The research is done personally (no email, fax or internet) and it cost
about 2 pesos (50 US cents) per name researched.

I knew a reliable person who did genealogic researchs (not only
immigration, but census, cemeteries, birth, etc). His site is
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/ where there's a contact mail
address. I don't know if he continues doing researchs but it's
worth to contact him.

If you don't have an answer to that mail, I can give you his personal one.

Hope this helps and good luck in your researchs.

Ariel PARKANSKY
(Buenos Aires, Argentina / Paris, France)
http://www.thefamilytree.com.ar (www_dot_thefamilytree_dot_com_dot_ar)

Kishinev, Tighina: PARKANSKY, LECHNER Kishinev, Calarasi: DUBIN,
CHERNIAVSKY, FISMAN Odessa: VAISBEN, HOCHMANN, SCHARTZ
Kiev, Odessa, Neporotovo, Podolia: ERLICHMAN, AISENGART
Kiliya: SCHWARZBERG Bessarabia, Akkerman, Odessa: GLASS, KERSCHNER,
ZEIGNER Chichelnik: ZUKERMAN, LASHOCK Podolia: SITCOF, MONDRIK, LERMAN


Flights from Marseille to Israel 1948 #general

John Berkeley <john.berkeley@...>
 

Three members of my family, having been held in the Gabersee DP camp,
managed to get on a night flight in a transport aircraft >from Marseille
to Israel in November 1948. They were housed in tents in the Marseille
area while they waited for a flight and, whilst on the aircraft, had to
sit on the floor but, allegedly, were able to open one of the
aircraft's windows!

Does anyone have any information on these flights, what aircraft were
used and any sources for further details?

John Berkeley (Berkovic)
Researcher 50255
Warwick UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Flights from Marseille to Israel 1948 #general

John Berkeley <john.berkeley@...>
 

Three members of my family, having been held in the Gabersee DP camp,
managed to get on a night flight in a transport aircraft >from Marseille
to Israel in November 1948. They were housed in tents in the Marseille
area while they waited for a flight and, whilst on the aircraft, had to
sit on the floor but, allegedly, were able to open one of the
aircraft's windows!

Does anyone have any information on these flights, what aircraft were
used and any sources for further details?

John Berkeley (Berkovic)
Researcher 50255
Warwick UK


Photographs of Gravestones #general

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Hi All,

I have read numerous posts requesting photographs >from distant cemeteries.
I'd like to share two techniques which have worked for me.

1. Telephone the cemetery and talk to someone in the office. Ask that
person for the grave location(s) of the deceased, then ask if he/she will
take a picture of the gravestone(s). Of course, you will offer to pay for
the photograph(s). Needless to say, if you want more than a few pictures,
this method can become costly -- and time consuming for the cemetery
personnel who may agree to take the pictures reluctantly. Even after that
person agrees, you may have to telephone a few times as a reminder.

2. This is my preferred method. Contact the cemetery and get all the
information about the gravesites. Then ask the person with whom you are
speaking if you may send a new, unused disposable camera and a stamped,
self-addressed envelope for return of the camera. When I did this, I went
to my local post office and purchased two padded envelopes. I put the
camera in the envelope which I had addressed to the cemetery. I also
included a typed list of the gravestones I wanted photographed, along with
the location of each grave. With the help of the postal clerk, who figured
out how much postage would be necessary to mail the camera back to me, I
then added the stamped, self-addressed padded envelope to the envelope which
already contained the camera and the typed list of names and grave
locations.

A short time after mailing the camera to the cemetery, I telephoned the
office to ask if it had arrived. That call served two purposes: It
confirmed to me that the package had reached its destination, and it was a
reminder to the cemetery personnel to take the photographs. I had to wait a
period of time -- I guess picture-taking is not high up on the list of their
priorities -- but the method did work! And the only cost to me was the
price of the camera, the postage in both directions, and developing the
film!

A final thought: I did this in the United States: Pennsylvania to New Jersey
and back to Pennsylvania. I do not know whether it would be helpful outside
the United States.

Shelda Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania USA

Researching: >from Mogilev gubernia, Belarus: BACHIN, SHAKHNOVITZ (or
alternate spellings); >from Galicia, Ukraine: APTOWITZER, APTOWITZ; From
Poland: LUDZKI/LODZKI, KARTOWSKI (or alternate spellings), SZAJMAN, NAJFELD,
GERZBERG/HERZBERG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photographs of Gravestones #general

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Hi All,

I have read numerous posts requesting photographs >from distant cemeteries.
I'd like to share two techniques which have worked for me.

1. Telephone the cemetery and talk to someone in the office. Ask that
person for the grave location(s) of the deceased, then ask if he/she will
take a picture of the gravestone(s). Of course, you will offer to pay for
the photograph(s). Needless to say, if you want more than a few pictures,
this method can become costly -- and time consuming for the cemetery
personnel who may agree to take the pictures reluctantly. Even after that
person agrees, you may have to telephone a few times as a reminder.

2. This is my preferred method. Contact the cemetery and get all the
information about the gravesites. Then ask the person with whom you are
speaking if you may send a new, unused disposable camera and a stamped,
self-addressed envelope for return of the camera. When I did this, I went
to my local post office and purchased two padded envelopes. I put the
camera in the envelope which I had addressed to the cemetery. I also
included a typed list of the gravestones I wanted photographed, along with
the location of each grave. With the help of the postal clerk, who figured
out how much postage would be necessary to mail the camera back to me, I
then added the stamped, self-addressed padded envelope to the envelope which
already contained the camera and the typed list of names and grave
locations.

A short time after mailing the camera to the cemetery, I telephoned the
office to ask if it had arrived. That call served two purposes: It
confirmed to me that the package had reached its destination, and it was a
reminder to the cemetery personnel to take the photographs. I had to wait a
period of time -- I guess picture-taking is not high up on the list of their
priorities -- but the method did work! And the only cost to me was the
price of the camera, the postage in both directions, and developing the
film!

A final thought: I did this in the United States: Pennsylvania to New Jersey
and back to Pennsylvania. I do not know whether it would be helpful outside
the United States.

Shelda Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania USA

Researching: >from Mogilev gubernia, Belarus: BACHIN, SHAKHNOVITZ (or
alternate spellings); >from Galicia, Ukraine: APTOWITZER, APTOWITZ; From
Poland: LUDZKI/LODZKI, KARTOWSKI (or alternate spellings), SZAJMAN, NAJFELD,
GERZBERG/HERZBERG


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter #1: Read All About It! #ukraine

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The first IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter is out. If it hasn't
already come to your virtual mailbox, you can read it at:

http://eepurl.com/epMd

Exciting developments are taking place daily and the newsletter is the
way to keep informed about plans for 2010. If you haven't subscribed, you
can do so at:

http://www.jgsla2010.com/about/sign-up-for-the-announcements-newsletter/

Mark your calendars now to attend >from Sunday, July 11th through
Friday, July 16th.
We are also scheduling a variety of optional pre-conference activities
which we will announce soon.

Early news is that Arthur Kurzweil will be our "Genealogist in
Residence" for the entire conference week. Author of ">from Generation
to Generation," and one of America's foremost experts in Jewish
genealogy, Kurzweil will be giving lectures and teaching classes,
along with performing his show "Searching for God in a Magic Shop," a
unique exploration of the world of illusions, offering profound ideas
of Jewish thought.

We're planning an inspiring, opening Sunday where you can immerse
yourself in an assortment of beginner's workshops and stroll through a
SIG "Market Square" to view a cornucopia of regional special interest
groups, get first-hand help with your research questions and meet the
foreign archivists and experts in overseas research who will be
lecturing later in the week. There will also be demonstrations of
shtetl crafts like weaving and needlework, along with cooking
workshops, films and more.

The conference hotel, the JW Marriott at L.A Live, is due to open in a
few months, but it's already looking quite spiffy. Still...it's the
participants filling the vast space that will bring this conference to
life, so start making plans now to attend >from July 11-16, 2010.

If you've got a talent, expertise or topic to share, consider submitting a
lecture proposal when the call for papers opens on November 15th. If
you are a vendor or exhibitor, contact us for details on how you can
participate. Our home page: www.jgsla2010.com is the portal to a
world of conference information, FAQs, and program highlights.
(And don't forget to join our Facebook page and check out our blog.

We look forward to celebrating 30 years of IAJGS conferences with you
this summer!

Pamela Weisberger
IAJGS 2010 Conference Co-Chair
pamela@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter #1: Read All About It! #ukraine

JGSLA2010 Info
 

The first IAJGS 2010 Conference Newsletter is out. If it hasn't
already come to your virtual mailbox, you can read it at:

http://eepurl.com/epMd

Exciting developments are taking place daily and the newsletter is the
way to keep informed about plans for 2010. If you haven't subscribed, you
can do so at:

http://www.jgsla2010.com/about/sign-up-for-the-announcements-newsletter/

Mark your calendars now to attend >from Sunday, July 11th through
Friday, July 16th.
We are also scheduling a variety of optional pre-conference activities
which we will announce soon.

Early news is that Arthur Kurzweil will be our "Genealogist in
Residence" for the entire conference week. Author of ">from Generation
to Generation," and one of America's foremost experts in Jewish
genealogy, Kurzweil will be giving lectures and teaching classes,
along with performing his show "Searching for God in a Magic Shop," a
unique exploration of the world of illusions, offering profound ideas
of Jewish thought.

We're planning an inspiring, opening Sunday where you can immerse
yourself in an assortment of beginner's workshops and stroll through a
SIG "Market Square" to view a cornucopia of regional special interest
groups, get first-hand help with your research questions and meet the
foreign archivists and experts in overseas research who will be
lecturing later in the week. There will also be demonstrations of
shtetl crafts like weaving and needlework, along with cooking
workshops, films and more.

The conference hotel, the JW Marriott at L.A Live, is due to open in a
few months, but it's already looking quite spiffy. Still...it's the
participants filling the vast space that will bring this conference to
life, so start making plans now to attend >from July 11-16, 2010.

If you've got a talent, expertise or topic to share, consider submitting a
lecture proposal when the call for papers opens on November 15th. If
you are a vendor or exhibitor, contact us for details on how you can
participate. Our home page: www.jgsla2010.com is the portal to a
world of conference information, FAQs, and program highlights.
(And don't forget to join our Facebook page and check out our blog.

We look forward to celebrating 30 years of IAJGS conferences with you
this summer!

Pamela Weisberger
IAJGS 2010 Conference Co-Chair
pamela@...
http://www.jgsla2010.com


Searching for Records 19th Century Volkovysk #belarus

EmmaTait2@...
 

We are >from the Shiff family, watchmakers in Volkovysk >from the early and
mid 19th century. Does anyone know if there are records of individuals
from that time and place? If so, how can they be accessed?
Would be grateful for any information or advice.

Many thanks.

Emma Tait
7 Montrose Avenue
London NW6 6LE
Tel: 0208 960 2556
Email: EmmaTait2@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching for Records 19th Century Volkovysk #belarus

EmmaTait2@...
 

We are >from the Shiff family, watchmakers in Volkovysk >from the early and
mid 19th century. Does anyone know if there are records of individuals
from that time and place? If so, how can they be accessed?
Would be grateful for any information or advice.

Many thanks.

Emma Tait
7 Montrose Avenue
London NW6 6LE
Tel: 0208 960 2556
Email: EmmaTait2@...