Date   

Update on Nowy Dwor Maz. #poland

Alan K'necht <alan@...>
 

For those of you with ancestors >from Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki I have some
great news to share.

The first bit of news concerns the Jewish Cemetery. Over the years I've
heard >from many of you who have visited Nowy Dwor and found the Jewish
cemetery. The cemetery has been completely neglected since the Holocaust
with virtually all matzivahs missing, many open graves where one can see
the bones of our ancestors, general erosion of the site and beyond a
simple wooden sign telling people what the site is no other reminder of
the once mighty Jewish community

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/nowydworm.htm
and
http://miasta.gazeta.pl/warszawa/1,34862,3334770.html
- sorry both articles are in Polish.

A few years ago there was a small effort to clean-up the cemetery and
rebury the exposed bones by Jewish Community of Warsaw after a few
Polish news outlets reported on it. Yet without constant attention
erosion of the cemetery continues. Fortunately thanks to Ze'ev Shaked a
major step in the preservation of the this important site is now
underway. Ze'ev has made arrangements with the Mayor of Nowy Dwor and
the Cheif Rabbi of Warsaw to first clean-up the cemetery and then to
have a fence built around it. The final negotiations with the Mayor are
now underway and Ze'ev plans on visiting Nowy Dwor within the next month =
to finalize these negotiations.

A significance discovery has also been made of a Jewish Tombstones
(matzivahs) that were being used to support a sidewalk along the Narev
River. Nowy Dwor is now carefully removing the matzivahs and they will
become part of the protected/restored cemetery.

Ze'ev and some of his supporters have started a small web site devoted
to this project. On the site you can see the proposed fence and some of
the recently recovered matzivahs. The site is located at
http://www.nowydworjewishmemorial.com and please remember the site is
just a few days old and is a work in progress. We will appreciate it if
you have an appropriate web site to please put a link to the site from
your site.

As the Nowy Dwor team leader, I'm helping Ze'ev keep in contact with all
the Nowy Dwor descendants and even a few survivors. If you're interested
about being updated on this project please let me know privately so I
can build a current email list. I recently sent out an email to many
people but my database of email address is old (some email addresses
date back to 1997) so many of the emails bounce back to me.

If you have any questions, please contact me.

In just over 2 weeks it will be Rosh Hashana, so we wish everyone a
happy, prosperous and healthy new year. May all you pray for come true.

Alan K'necht
alan@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Update on Nowy Dwor Maz. #poland

Alan K'necht <alan@...>
 

For those of you with ancestors >from Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki I have some
great news to share.

The first bit of news concerns the Jewish Cemetery. Over the years I've
heard >from many of you who have visited Nowy Dwor and found the Jewish
cemetery. The cemetery has been completely neglected since the Holocaust
with virtually all matzivahs missing, many open graves where one can see
the bones of our ancestors, general erosion of the site and beyond a
simple wooden sign telling people what the site is no other reminder of
the once mighty Jewish community

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/nowydworm.htm
and
http://miasta.gazeta.pl/warszawa/1,34862,3334770.html
- sorry both articles are in Polish.

A few years ago there was a small effort to clean-up the cemetery and
rebury the exposed bones by Jewish Community of Warsaw after a few
Polish news outlets reported on it. Yet without constant attention
erosion of the cemetery continues. Fortunately thanks to Ze'ev Shaked a
major step in the preservation of the this important site is now
underway. Ze'ev has made arrangements with the Mayor of Nowy Dwor and
the Cheif Rabbi of Warsaw to first clean-up the cemetery and then to
have a fence built around it. The final negotiations with the Mayor are
now underway and Ze'ev plans on visiting Nowy Dwor within the next month =
to finalize these negotiations.

A significance discovery has also been made of a Jewish Tombstones
(matzivahs) that were being used to support a sidewalk along the Narev
River. Nowy Dwor is now carefully removing the matzivahs and they will
become part of the protected/restored cemetery.

Ze'ev and some of his supporters have started a small web site devoted
to this project. On the site you can see the proposed fence and some of
the recently recovered matzivahs. The site is located at
http://www.nowydworjewishmemorial.com and please remember the site is
just a few days old and is a work in progress. We will appreciate it if
you have an appropriate web site to please put a link to the site from
your site.

As the Nowy Dwor team leader, I'm helping Ze'ev keep in contact with all
the Nowy Dwor descendants and even a few survivors. If you're interested
about being updated on this project please let me know privately so I
can build a current email list. I recently sent out an email to many
people but my database of email address is old (some email addresses
date back to 1997) so many of the emails bounce back to me.

If you have any questions, please contact me.

In just over 2 weeks it will be Rosh Hashana, so we wish everyone a
happy, prosperous and healthy new year. May all you pray for come true.

Alan K'necht
alan@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JRI Poland #Poland Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: GELERINTER/MAZEL Questions #poland

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Dovie asked:

"1) Why take her name? Unless she was >from such an important family,
that it was "part of the marriage deal" Did that happen a lot?

2) Srul was only 16 or 17 in 1833. Does it make sense that he got
married so young?"

In the parts of Poland which were in Russia, Jews were required to
take surnames only in 1827, so in 1833 he could have done anything as
the family names weren't entirely fixed until maybe 10 years later.
Also, marriages were often arranged between cousins, so Gelernter might
well have been 'in the family'. And 'learned' is better sounding than
'lucky'! Besides, it was not uncommon for a husband to take the bride's
surname, especially if the bride's family had only girls.

16 or 17 wasn't young. He was 'mature'. It is said, 'Childhood is
the invention of 20th century America.' Your life was much more in a
certain structure at that time; remember Fiddler on the Roof; everyone
had a job in the "proper home, the kosher home". People are amazed
that 8 and 9 year old kids travelled alone across the Atlantic - but these
weren't today's 'coddled' kids, they worked hard at home or at 'real'
jobs when they weren't in school.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


JRI Poland #Poland Re: GELERINTER/MAZEL Questions #poland

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Dovie asked:

"1) Why take her name? Unless she was >from such an important family,
that it was "part of the marriage deal" Did that happen a lot?

2) Srul was only 16 or 17 in 1833. Does it make sense that he got
married so young?"

In the parts of Poland which were in Russia, Jews were required to
take surnames only in 1827, so in 1833 he could have done anything as
the family names weren't entirely fixed until maybe 10 years later.
Also, marriages were often arranged between cousins, so Gelernter might
well have been 'in the family'. And 'learned' is better sounding than
'lucky'! Besides, it was not uncommon for a husband to take the bride's
surname, especially if the bride's family had only girls.

16 or 17 wasn't young. He was 'mature'. It is said, 'Childhood is
the invention of 20th century America.' Your life was much more in a
certain structure at that time; remember Fiddler on the Roof; everyone
had a job in the "proper home, the kosher home". People are amazed
that 8 and 9 year old kids travelled alone across the Atlantic - but these
weren't today's 'coddled' kids, they worked hard at home or at 'real'
jobs when they weren't in school.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


Re: Additional question regarding Polish record online #poland

elanc@...
 

Dovie wrote:
"I recently found some records of interest on JRI Poland. There are some,
however that may or may not be of interest to me. I'm trying to find
siblings of my GGGF, and there are loads of births in the area, but the
online records don't have father or mother listed, despite having columns
for them."

The Polish books of vital records typically contain one or two records
per page with all the detailed information. Each book also contains
summary pages listing all births, deaths, or marriages for a particular
year. The JRI index is built >from the summary pages which include a
small subset of the information. If you find in the index a record that
is a likely match for your search, the only way to get the more detailed
information is to copy the full record >from the LDS microfilm or to order
it >from the Polish archives, as the case may be.

Elan Caspi
El Cerrito, CA


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Additional question regarding Polish record online #poland

elanc@...
 

Dovie wrote:
"I recently found some records of interest on JRI Poland. There are some,
however that may or may not be of interest to me. I'm trying to find
siblings of my GGGF, and there are loads of births in the area, but the
online records don't have father or mother listed, despite having columns
for them."

The Polish books of vital records typically contain one or two records
per page with all the detailed information. Each book also contains
summary pages listing all births, deaths, or marriages for a particular
year. The JRI index is built >from the summary pages which include a
small subset of the information. If you find in the index a record that
is a likely match for your search, the only way to get the more detailed
information is to copy the full record >from the LDS microfilm or to order
it >from the Polish archives, as the case may be.

Elan Caspi
El Cerrito, CA


Surname lists help ensure you don't miss names on LDS films #poland

Jrbaston
 

Eric Cooper recently asked about whether it was possible to search the
JRI-Poland database by LDS film number, so he would make sure he didn't
miss any names while he was searching the film.

Although it is not possible to search the database by film number, the
surname lists for most towns, which are linked >from the "Your Town"
pages are a great first step to doing a database search. The Surname
Lists show every surname (including spelling variants) in a town's
index files. If you first check the Surname List for a town's LDS
files, note all the surnames of interest and then search for each of
them, you'll be sure not to miss any names of interest in your
family research.

Judy Baston, member, JRI-Poland Board


JRI Poland #Poland Surname lists help ensure you don't miss names on LDS films #poland

Jrbaston
 

Eric Cooper recently asked about whether it was possible to search the
JRI-Poland database by LDS film number, so he would make sure he didn't
miss any names while he was searching the film.

Although it is not possible to search the database by film number, the
surname lists for most towns, which are linked >from the "Your Town"
pages are a great first step to doing a database search. The Surname
Lists show every surname (including spelling variants) in a town's
index files. If you first check the Surname List for a town's LDS
files, note all the surnames of interest and then search for each of
them, you'll be sure not to miss any names of interest in your
family research.

Judy Baston, member, JRI-Poland Board


Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #austria-czech

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #austria-czech

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JGSGW meets in Rockville, MD on September 13 #poland

Jeff Miller
 

The Virtual Shtetl Project will be presented at the next meeting of the
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington on Sunday, September 13.

Registration and "schmooze" begins at 1pm, at B'nai Israel, in Rockville,
Maryland.

The speakers will be Museum of the History of Polish Jews deputy
coordinator Grzegorz (Greg) Kolacz; the museum's executive director
Robert Socolof; and Beata Schulman, on the North American Council of
the Museum.

The program will begin with a brief introduction to the Museum which will
open in 2012 on the former Warsaw Ghetto site, and will then continue with
the Virtual Shtetl Portal, devoted to local Jewish history.

For more information and directions, check the JGSGW site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw

Jeff Miller, President
JGSGW
N. Virginia/Washington DC/Maryland


JRI Poland #Poland JGSGW meets in Rockville, MD on September 13 #poland

Jeff Miller
 

The Virtual Shtetl Project will be presented at the next meeting of the
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington on Sunday, September 13.

Registration and "schmooze" begins at 1pm, at B'nai Israel, in Rockville,
Maryland.

The speakers will be Museum of the History of Polish Jews deputy
coordinator Grzegorz (Greg) Kolacz; the museum's executive director
Robert Socolof; and Beata Schulman, on the North American Council of
the Museum.

The program will begin with a brief introduction to the Museum which will
open in 2012 on the former Warsaw Ghetto site, and will then continue with
the Virtual Shtetl Portal, devoted to local Jewish history.

For more information and directions, check the JGSGW site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw

Jeff Miller, President
JGSGW
N. Virginia/Washington DC/Maryland


reverse JRI-PL indexes of LDS films? #poland

Eric Cooper
 

A recent post >from a researcher who had checked out a particular LDS
film reminded me of a question I've had for a while:

Given a film number, is there any way to get the list of all JRI-PL
index records for that film?

Such a capability would be very helpful when checking out a film, to
make sure one doesn't miss other names of interest.

--
Eric Cooper e c c @ c m u . e d u

MODERATOR'S NOTE: It is not possible to search the JRI-Poland
database by film number.


JRI Poland #Poland reverse JRI-PL indexes of LDS films? #poland

Eric Cooper
 

A recent post >from a researcher who had checked out a particular LDS
film reminded me of a question I've had for a while:

Given a film number, is there any way to get the list of all JRI-PL
index records for that film?

Such a capability would be very helpful when checking out a film, to
make sure one doesn't miss other names of interest.

--
Eric Cooper e c c @ c m u . e d u

MODERATOR'S NOTE: It is not possible to search the JRI-Poland
database by film number.


JGS GREATER MIAMI 9/13/09 DANIEL SHOER-ROTH GUEST SPEAKER TRIP TO POLAND #poland

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

JGS of Greater Miami will be meeting on Sunday September 13, 2009
10:00am at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, FL Tel: 305-576-4000 for directions Free Secure Parking on site.
Light refreshments served. (Have ID with you)

We are delighted that Daniel Shoer-Roth, a metro reporter and columnist
for El Nuevo Herald (whose work also appears in the English-language Miami
Herald), will be the guest speaker at the JGS of Greater Miami meeting
Sunday, September 13.

Shoer-Roth grew up in Venezuela. He was close to and spent a lot of time
with his grandfather, but he never knew much about the life of his
ancestors in Poland before and during World War II. As is the case with
many of that generation, Elias Roth didn't talk much about it.

In his quest to learn more, Daniel traveled to Poland and did extensive
genealogical research, starting in the records area of the Nowy Sacz city
hall, talking with an 88-year-old one-time resident and finally visiting
the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw.

He told his story in a July 19 article in the Miami Herald (and, in
Spanish, in El Nuevo Herald). On September 13, he'll talk more about his
genealogical quest and will expand on the original story.

Guests are always welcome. Every one receives a free Jewish calendar
while supplies last.

Wishing all a "L. Shona Tova"

Joan Parker, President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@...

Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN/GUDSTEIN (sp), BERGER, JAGODA/YAGODA-Plock,
Poland/Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY; Galveston, TX.
PINKUS/PINCUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, (Litovsk) Belarus; Grodno, Russia;
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY.
WEISS-Brooklyn, NY; NEIBERG-Brooklyn, NY; DEL PINO-Brooklyn, NY.
KATZ, TROCK, GELFAND, KRITZOFF-Minsk, Belarus; Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami
Beach, FL.


JRI Poland #Poland JGS GREATER MIAMI 9/13/09 DANIEL SHOER-ROTH GUEST SPEAKER TRIP TO POLAND #poland

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

JGS of Greater Miami will be meeting on Sunday September 13, 2009
10:00am at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, FL Tel: 305-576-4000 for directions Free Secure Parking on site.
Light refreshments served. (Have ID with you)

We are delighted that Daniel Shoer-Roth, a metro reporter and columnist
for El Nuevo Herald (whose work also appears in the English-language Miami
Herald), will be the guest speaker at the JGS of Greater Miami meeting
Sunday, September 13.

Shoer-Roth grew up in Venezuela. He was close to and spent a lot of time
with his grandfather, but he never knew much about the life of his
ancestors in Poland before and during World War II. As is the case with
many of that generation, Elias Roth didn't talk much about it.

In his quest to learn more, Daniel traveled to Poland and did extensive
genealogical research, starting in the records area of the Nowy Sacz city
hall, talking with an 88-year-old one-time resident and finally visiting
the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw.

He told his story in a July 19 article in the Miami Herald (and, in
Spanish, in El Nuevo Herald). On September 13, he'll talk more about his
genealogical quest and will expand on the original story.

Guests are always welcome. Every one receives a free Jewish calendar
while supplies last.

Wishing all a "L. Shona Tova"

Joan Parker, President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@...

Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN/GUDSTEIN (sp), BERGER, JAGODA/YAGODA-Plock,
Poland/Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY; Galveston, TX.
PINKUS/PINCUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, (Litovsk) Belarus; Grodno, Russia;
Bronx and Brooklyn, NY.
WEISS-Brooklyn, NY; NEIBERG-Brooklyn, NY; DEL PINO-Brooklyn, NY.
KATZ, TROCK, GELFAND, KRITZOFF-Minsk, Belarus; Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami
Beach, FL.


Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project, August 2009 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Yes, another very productive month, and this is due to a continued effort by
a very diligent team of volunteers and professional translators who work
behind the scenes. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank
the volunteers who have been carefully and patiently transliterating
necrologies and also the editors who have carefully gone over these same
necrologies and texts to ensure that the material placed in the Yizkor Book
site is as precise as we can possibly make it.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Max Heffler, who is a
very integral part of the Yizkor Book html team (and many other teams!), and
also takes care of the huge task of regularly placing the online Yizkor Book
necrologies into the Yizkor Book necrology database which serves as a very
helpful tool for finding where information is located on families killed in
the Holocaust .

Statistics -- During this month we carried out 15 updates for:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Kaluszyn, Poland
-Katowice, Poland
-Kolo, Poland
-Kutno, Poland
-Lithuania (lita.html)
-Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland
-Strzemieszyce Wielkie, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Tighina, Moldova (Bendery)

We also added in 8 new books:

-Baranów Sandomierski, Poland
-Byten, Belarus
-Chorzele, Poland
-Dobromil, Ukraine
-Golub-Dobrzy&#324;, Poland
-Komárno, Slovakia
-Lakhva, Belarus
-Sierpc, Poland

With the addition of these new books I am happy to announce that we have
now more than 500 books online (506, at last count!) together with almost
900 entries, that is to say pages for Jewish communities that don't
necessarily have their own Yizkor book. The bulk of these entries come from
the Encyclopedias of Jewish Communities (Pinkasei Hakehillot) which have
historical information all the Jewish communities, no matter how large or
how small. And regarding these entries -- I would like to suggest to those
of you whose family came >from communities that don't appear in any Yizkor
book to consider preparing a translation of the entry >from the respective
encyclopedia, or engaging a professional translator to do so.

If you require assistance regarding this or about any facet of the Yizkor
Book Project, I would be glad to hear >from you. Please remember that all
this month's additions and updates have been flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager