Date   

KARASIKS in Chicago #belarus

Juditomfox1@...
 

I am looking for information about any members of the KARASIK family now
living in Chicago Illinois. The Patriarch of this family was Pinchas the son of
Shalom Feivush, Ha Levi.

Three sons of Pinchas came to the United States and settled in Chicago.
These were Meier KARASIK, Morris KARASIK and Max KARASIK ( Mendel). Pinkas (
Pinchus), aka Pinky also lived in Chicago. These KARASIKS came >from Mogilev
Gubernia in Belarus. There was also a daughter, Kayla, married to Israel
GLICKLIN, who settled with her family in Detroit Michigan.

Meier was married to Rascha. Morris was married to Sarah Golden. Max was
married to Yetta.

Judith KOENIG FOX
West Bloomfield, Michigan
juditomfox1@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with family information,
general research may be posted to the list.


Belarus SIG #Belarus KARASIKS in Chicago #belarus

Juditomfox1@...
 

I am looking for information about any members of the KARASIK family now
living in Chicago Illinois. The Patriarch of this family was Pinchas the son of
Shalom Feivush, Ha Levi.

Three sons of Pinchas came to the United States and settled in Chicago.
These were Meier KARASIK, Morris KARASIK and Max KARASIK ( Mendel). Pinkas (
Pinchus), aka Pinky also lived in Chicago. These KARASIKS came >from Mogilev
Gubernia in Belarus. There was also a daughter, Kayla, married to Israel
GLICKLIN, who settled with her family in Detroit Michigan.

Meier was married to Rascha. Morris was married to Sarah Golden. Max was
married to Yetta.

Judith KOENIG FOX
West Bloomfield, Michigan
juditomfox1@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with family information,
general research may be posted to the list.


Gorodok-Cemetery Information #belarus

Michael Glazer <m.glazer1@...>
 

I have obtained a large number of photographs of the cemetery for the
town of Gorodok north of Vitebsk and have placed them on a webpage
www.n122mg.com/1344.htm. Thanks to help >from David Rosen I have added
translations of the texts for some of the gravestones. Unfortunately
most of the gravestones are in poor condition, but it may be that
someone can glean some more information than I have so far. There is
also a button on this web page to another one showing some details of
Gorodok today. The head of the small remaining Jewish community there is
Mark Krivichkin and can be seen in a couple of the photographs. I am
hoping in due course that we shall find a way to make the writings on
the gravestones clearer.
Mike Glazer
UK
(researching BEDEROV >from Gorodok)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Additional information on cemeteries worldwide may be found
at the JewishGen site, http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/


Belarus SIG #Belarus Gorodok-Cemetery Information #belarus

Michael Glazer <m.glazer1@...>
 

I have obtained a large number of photographs of the cemetery for the
town of Gorodok north of Vitebsk and have placed them on a webpage
www.n122mg.com/1344.htm. Thanks to help >from David Rosen I have added
translations of the texts for some of the gravestones. Unfortunately
most of the gravestones are in poor condition, but it may be that
someone can glean some more information than I have so far. There is
also a button on this web page to another one showing some details of
Gorodok today. The head of the small remaining Jewish community there is
Mark Krivichkin and can be seen in a couple of the photographs. I am
hoping in due course that we shall find a way to make the writings on
the gravestones clearer.
Mike Glazer
UK
(researching BEDEROV >from Gorodok)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Additional information on cemeteries worldwide may be found
at the JewishGen site, http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/


Cekovitz and Kritz in Bohemia? #austria-czech

Linda Berkowitz <e-berkowitz@...>
 

I recently received my grandfather's birth certificate which I thought
would clarify the birthplace of both my grandfather's parents, but it
has instead confused me further.

I have my great grandfather's death certificate which indicates his
birthplace as Bechovice ( or Berkocitz), Bohemia. However my
grandfather's birth certificate gives his place of birth as Cekovitz.
I had posted on this before because the family name, GOLDSTEIN, is not
common in Bohemia and it was suggested that the family came >from
either Poland or Germany.

Likewise I don't know what to make of the town Kritz, which is listed
on my grandfather's birth certificate as my great grandmother's place
of birth. In the 1930 Census my great grandmother listed her birth
place as Tabor. Of all of the cities that have a similar
pronunciation to Kritz, are any of them near Tabor? By the way, her
family name was FANTL.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Linda Berkowitz
Northbrook, IL

Also looking for the following families >from Bohemia:
FANTL, FREUND, STEINDLER, WEISS, HARTMANN, KIND, WEISEL, TAUSSIG,
GOLDSTEIN, PARISEK


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Cekovitz and Kritz in Bohemia? #austria-czech

Linda Berkowitz <e-berkowitz@...>
 

I recently received my grandfather's birth certificate which I thought
would clarify the birthplace of both my grandfather's parents, but it
has instead confused me further.

I have my great grandfather's death certificate which indicates his
birthplace as Bechovice ( or Berkocitz), Bohemia. However my
grandfather's birth certificate gives his place of birth as Cekovitz.
I had posted on this before because the family name, GOLDSTEIN, is not
common in Bohemia and it was suggested that the family came >from
either Poland or Germany.

Likewise I don't know what to make of the town Kritz, which is listed
on my grandfather's birth certificate as my great grandmother's place
of birth. In the 1930 Census my great grandmother listed her birth
place as Tabor. Of all of the cities that have a similar
pronunciation to Kritz, are any of them near Tabor? By the way, her
family name was FANTL.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Linda Berkowitz
Northbrook, IL

Also looking for the following families >from Bohemia:
FANTL, FREUND, STEINDLER, WEISS, HARTMANN, KIND, WEISEL, TAUSSIG,
GOLDSTEIN, PARISEK


gaya-vradist #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Rick Glaser asked:
Where is Gaya?
One question on the form is religion. The answer: mos for mosaic, i.e.,
Jewish. But then there is a second question jude? Is the person Jewish?
Why ask it twice?
One question is Staatsangehorigkeit - citizenship, i presume. The answer
is Prot. What is that?
The birthplace of my grandfather Bernard, who lived in Hodonin, is given as
Vradist, Slovakia. I assume that there is another SIG for Slovakia?
The form for Bernard's grandson, Erich GLASER, who was living in Hodonin,
gives his birthplace as Horn, in N. Donau. Where is that?
Finally, there are places for three signatures:
Unterschrift d. Meidepflichtigen - signed by Bernard
Untershcrift des Whonungsinhabers, again, signed by Bernard
Unterschrift des Hauseigentumers: signed by another person, presumably the
landlord/lady
What are the first two signatures meaning?

Answers:
Gaya is the German name of Kyjov/Moravia
For Nazis was not the religion but the race crucial. A Christian with three
Jewish grandparents was considered as a Jew. That is why these two questions
are logical.
Prot. = Protektorat Boehmen and Maehren = the name of the occupied Bohemia
and Moravia (without "Sudetenland").
SIG for Slovakia is the Hungarian SIG (h-sig). Vradiste is a place in
Skalica district, Trnava region in Slovakia.
N. Donau? - Are you sure? Horn is a town in Niederoesterreich = N.
Oesterreich (State in Austria), near the Czech border.
Every person was meldepflichtig = notifiable.
Only one person in the family was Wohnungsinhaber = flat owner. Mostly the
husband and father.
If the flat was hired, then the Hauseigentuemer = house owner was a other
person as the flat owner.

Regards
Hanus Grab


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech gaya-vradist #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Rick Glaser asked:
Where is Gaya?
One question on the form is religion. The answer: mos for mosaic, i.e.,
Jewish. But then there is a second question jude? Is the person Jewish?
Why ask it twice?
One question is Staatsangehorigkeit - citizenship, i presume. The answer
is Prot. What is that?
The birthplace of my grandfather Bernard, who lived in Hodonin, is given as
Vradist, Slovakia. I assume that there is another SIG for Slovakia?
The form for Bernard's grandson, Erich GLASER, who was living in Hodonin,
gives his birthplace as Horn, in N. Donau. Where is that?
Finally, there are places for three signatures:
Unterschrift d. Meidepflichtigen - signed by Bernard
Untershcrift des Whonungsinhabers, again, signed by Bernard
Unterschrift des Hauseigentumers: signed by another person, presumably the
landlord/lady
What are the first two signatures meaning?

Answers:
Gaya is the German name of Kyjov/Moravia
For Nazis was not the religion but the race crucial. A Christian with three
Jewish grandparents was considered as a Jew. That is why these two questions
are logical.
Prot. = Protektorat Boehmen and Maehren = the name of the occupied Bohemia
and Moravia (without "Sudetenland").
SIG for Slovakia is the Hungarian SIG (h-sig). Vradiste is a place in
Skalica district, Trnava region in Slovakia.
N. Donau? - Are you sure? Horn is a town in Niederoesterreich = N.
Oesterreich (State in Austria), near the Czech border.
Every person was meldepflichtig = notifiable.
Only one person in the family was Wohnungsinhaber = flat owner. Mostly the
husband and father.
If the flat was hired, then the Hauseigentuemer = house owner was a other
person as the flat owner.

Regards
Hanus Grab


August 13, 2008 Gaya Vradist #austria-czech

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

I will stupidly take a stab at some of the questions of Rick Glaser.

Prot could only be an abbreviation for the Protektorat, what the Nazi's called their occupation area.
The reason for two seemingly religious questions have to do with race and religion. For the Nazi's being
Jewish meant being a member of the Religion, but also of a Race. Obviously some persons became Jewish
through conversion, and this may have been a way to separate the accounting process but not the evil
intent.

Slovakia is part of the Hungarian Sig for it was a part of Hungary for 1000 years and many of the records,
up until 1919, and then >from 1939 to 1944 were kept according to Hungarian laws. During the Nazi era,
Slovakia was separated >from the Chech part and a large chunk given back to Hungary, the rest was also
a Protektorat run by a despicable person named Tiso. The Hungarian SIG covers those areas that were
part of the Austro-Hungarian dual monarchy but that do not include Austria, Bohemia, Moravia and the
former Austrian possessions which became part of the former Yugoslavia, or Poland.

Hope this answers some of your questions and I hope some of my answers were correct.

Peter Bakos
Budapest
Podvinecz, Haurowitz, Ledetsch and a host of others


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech August 13, 2008 Gaya Vradist #austria-czech

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

I will stupidly take a stab at some of the questions of Rick Glaser.

Prot could only be an abbreviation for the Protektorat, what the Nazi's called their occupation area.
The reason for two seemingly religious questions have to do with race and religion. For the Nazi's being
Jewish meant being a member of the Religion, but also of a Race. Obviously some persons became Jewish
through conversion, and this may have been a way to separate the accounting process but not the evil
intent.

Slovakia is part of the Hungarian Sig for it was a part of Hungary for 1000 years and many of the records,
up until 1919, and then >from 1939 to 1944 were kept according to Hungarian laws. During the Nazi era,
Slovakia was separated >from the Chech part and a large chunk given back to Hungary, the rest was also
a Protektorat run by a despicable person named Tiso. The Hungarian SIG covers those areas that were
part of the Austro-Hungarian dual monarchy but that do not include Austria, Bohemia, Moravia and the
former Austrian possessions which became part of the former Yugoslavia, or Poland.

Hope this answers some of your questions and I hope some of my answers were correct.

Peter Bakos
Budapest
Podvinecz, Haurowitz, Ledetsch and a host of others


Connecting Local and Czech research for Glickauf #austria-czech

WILLIAM SHAPIRO <bbshap@...>
 

I am a first time writer to the sig. I am researching my ggf Henry GLICKAUF, b 7/28/1861, d 1/27/1919 in
Chicago. Place of birth on the 1910 census is listed as Bohemia; it is listed as Austria on his death
certificate, but no town is given. His parents' birthplace indicates Austria but does not provide a town
name either. Henry's mother's name is clear on the death certificate: Frances TAUSIG. His father's name
has the "genealogical purposes only" stamped on it, so it is unclear--possibly Hermann. Henry is buried
at the Jewish Waldheim Cemetary in Chicago, and I plan to go to his gravesite. Although it will be good to
say kaddish, I'm not sure how helpful the information will be that I will get >from his grave stone. If
passenger ship lists will be helpful, I'm not sure what port Henry came in to, and how to pursue this.

I had a higly recommended professional genealogist trying to help me with this part of my tree. I was
given two GLUCKAUF (umlaut "u") trees (Joseph dating to 1735 and Jacob dating to 1710). Unfortunately
neither of these trees connect to my Henry.

The other piece of information to give you is that there is another GLICKAUF on my tree. This is Kate
GLICKAUF. She is a relation through marriage, but if I can connect her to the tree >from the Czech
genealogists, that would be a success for my cousins (among others). My great aunt, Bertha LOEFFLER
(1853-1931), married Wilhelm/William LEVY (1854-1925). Wilhelm/William was born in Bohemia (state
listed as unknown) and died in Cook County, IL. His parents were Abraham LEVY (b1818 d1896) and
Kate GLICKAUF (b? d?) . On the Czech genealogist's tree, there is an Abraham LOWY (b? d?) married to a
Kate GLUCKAUF (b? d?). Would Lowy be Levy, much as Gluckauf would be Glickauf? On this same tree
from the Czech genealogists, Abraham and Kate had 3 children, Jakob b 10/15/1850 d?, Fraziska
b 1/1/1852 d?, and August b 11/14/1853 d?. I'm trying to investigate to see if my Wilhelm/ William
might be a fourth and the youngest child of the Katarina GLUCKAUF and Abraham LOWY on the Czech
tree. I contacted Jewish Waldheim, and it looks like William, Bertha, and Kate are all buried next to each
other.

So, any suggestions on how to determine Henry GLICKAUF''s town of birth (as a step toward connecting
him to one of the two Czech trees) and how to connect my Kate Glickauf to the Czech tree.

Thank you,

Betty Pollack Shapiro
Elkins Park, PA
Researching: POLLACK, GLICKAUF, LOEFFLER, MANDL, LOWY, KLINGER, FREUND, KOHN


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Connecting Local and Czech research for Glickauf #austria-czech

WILLIAM SHAPIRO <bbshap@...>
 

I am a first time writer to the sig. I am researching my ggf Henry GLICKAUF, b 7/28/1861, d 1/27/1919 in
Chicago. Place of birth on the 1910 census is listed as Bohemia; it is listed as Austria on his death
certificate, but no town is given. His parents' birthplace indicates Austria but does not provide a town
name either. Henry's mother's name is clear on the death certificate: Frances TAUSIG. His father's name
has the "genealogical purposes only" stamped on it, so it is unclear--possibly Hermann. Henry is buried
at the Jewish Waldheim Cemetary in Chicago, and I plan to go to his gravesite. Although it will be good to
say kaddish, I'm not sure how helpful the information will be that I will get >from his grave stone. If
passenger ship lists will be helpful, I'm not sure what port Henry came in to, and how to pursue this.

I had a higly recommended professional genealogist trying to help me with this part of my tree. I was
given two GLUCKAUF (umlaut "u") trees (Joseph dating to 1735 and Jacob dating to 1710). Unfortunately
neither of these trees connect to my Henry.

The other piece of information to give you is that there is another GLICKAUF on my tree. This is Kate
GLICKAUF. She is a relation through marriage, but if I can connect her to the tree >from the Czech
genealogists, that would be a success for my cousins (among others). My great aunt, Bertha LOEFFLER
(1853-1931), married Wilhelm/William LEVY (1854-1925). Wilhelm/William was born in Bohemia (state
listed as unknown) and died in Cook County, IL. His parents were Abraham LEVY (b1818 d1896) and
Kate GLICKAUF (b? d?) . On the Czech genealogist's tree, there is an Abraham LOWY (b? d?) married to a
Kate GLUCKAUF (b? d?). Would Lowy be Levy, much as Gluckauf would be Glickauf? On this same tree
from the Czech genealogists, Abraham and Kate had 3 children, Jakob b 10/15/1850 d?, Fraziska
b 1/1/1852 d?, and August b 11/14/1853 d?. I'm trying to investigate to see if my Wilhelm/ William
might be a fourth and the youngest child of the Katarina GLUCKAUF and Abraham LOWY on the Czech
tree. I contacted Jewish Waldheim, and it looks like William, Bertha, and Kate are all buried next to each
other.

So, any suggestions on how to determine Henry GLICKAUF''s town of birth (as a step toward connecting
him to one of the two Czech trees) and how to connect my Kate Glickauf to the Czech tree.

Thank you,

Betty Pollack Shapiro
Elkins Park, PA
Researching: POLLACK, GLICKAUF, LOEFFLER, MANDL, LOWY, KLINGER, FREUND, KOHN


DNA testing question #dna

Adam Eisen
 

Does anyone know if there are DNA tests that can confirm that the
same man is the father of the following two living persons:

-His known granddaughter (thru an already deceased daughter)
-His possible daughter (living)

Adam Eisen
Stockholm, Sweden


DNA Research #DNA DNA testing question #dna

Adam Eisen
 

Does anyone know if there are DNA tests that can confirm that the
same man is the father of the following two living persons:

-His known granddaughter (thru an already deceased daughter)
-His possible daughter (living)

Adam Eisen
Stockholm, Sweden


Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

I was unable to access the English version of the website cited in the email below.
B Weill
Brooklyn, NY

----- Original Message ----
From: Beth Long <bethlong3@...>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 6, 2008 2:36:46 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Genealogical experiences in Hungary
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi Michele,

What a great report! I live in Budapest and have been to the cemetery many times, but never knew about the "bicyle men". That is, I always saw them around, but didn't know what the protocol was.

Your analysis of Sip utca is (alas) quite correct. I dread having to go there. Fortunately, there is an alternative for Budapest records; the Budapest City Archives, which is quite modern and comfortable. They have both the civil records and the Jewish records (the latter only through 1895, when civil registration began).

As for the Budapest Jewish burial records, there is an online database:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Once you find someone here, you can find the grave, AND you can go back to the smoking lady at the Sip utca burial office and ask to see the card (which has usually lots of good information). Using this additional information, you can go to the city archive and pull the civil death record (and even make a digital photograph of it if you like, as long as it is at least 30 years old).

Same goes for civil birth and marriage records, except that birth records must be more than 90 years old, and marriage records, 75 (used to be 60, but recently changed).

Beth Long
Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

I was unable to access the English version of the website cited in the email below.
B Weill
Brooklyn, NY

----- Original Message ----
From: Beth Long <bethlong3@...>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 6, 2008 2:36:46 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Genealogical experiences in Hungary
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi Michele,

What a great report! I live in Budapest and have been to the cemetery many times, but never knew about the "bicyle men". That is, I always saw them around, but didn't know what the protocol was.

Your analysis of Sip utca is (alas) quite correct. I dread having to go there. Fortunately, there is an alternative for Budapest records; the Budapest City Archives, which is quite modern and comfortable. They have both the civil records and the Jewish records (the latter only through 1895, when civil registration began).

As for the Budapest Jewish burial records, there is an online database:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Once you find someone here, you can find the grave, AND you can go back to the smoking lady at the Sip utca burial office and ask to see the card (which has usually lots of good information). Using this additional information, you can go to the city archive and pull the civil death record (and even make a digital photograph of it if you like, as long as it is at least 30 years old).

Same goes for civil birth and marriage records, except that birth records must be more than 90 years old, and marriage records, 75 (used to be 60, but recently changed).

Beth Long
Budapest


Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary #hungary

Sarah&Laurent Kassel <kassells@...>
 

I also had me equally bad experience at the office of the Jewish Community of Budapest, Sip utca.

But I'd like to add a question. Both the Chevra kadisha and the Civil Records office use a data base. The data bases are different and not interconnected. Both failed to find a grave of an ancestor of mine who died on Dec 1st 1895 (not so long ago). I found the grave itself....

So who knows how those two data bases were built?

I went to the Kerepesi ut cemetery. There the care taker showed me the original registers with their index. He could find easily the grave that was not in the computer. May be we could start a project digitizing those registers.

Best regards,

Laurent Kassel
Moreshet, Israel

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary
From: Beth Long
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 23:36:46 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Michele,

Your analysis of Sip utca is (alas) quite correct. I dread having to go there. Fortunately, there is an alternative for Budapest records; the Budapest City Archives, which is quite modern and comfortable. They have both the civil records and the Jewish records (the latter only through 1895, when civil registration began).

As for the Budapest Jewish burial records, there is an online database:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Once you find someone here, you can find the grave, AND you can go back to the smoking lady at the Sip utca burial office and ask to see the card (which has usually lots of good information). Using this additional information, you can go to the city archive and pull the civil death record (and even make a digital photograph of it if you like, as long as it is at least 30 years old).

Same goes for civil birth and marriage records, except that birth records must be more than 90 years old, and marriage records, 75 (used to be 60, but recently changed).

Beth Long
Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary #hungary

Sarah&Laurent Kassel <kassells@...>
 

I also had me equally bad experience at the office of the Jewish Community of Budapest, Sip utca.

But I'd like to add a question. Both the Chevra kadisha and the Civil Records office use a data base. The data bases are different and not interconnected. Both failed to find a grave of an ancestor of mine who died on Dec 1st 1895 (not so long ago). I found the grave itself....

So who knows how those two data bases were built?

I went to the Kerepesi ut cemetery. There the care taker showed me the original registers with their index. He could find easily the grave that was not in the computer. May be we could start a project digitizing those registers.

Best regards,

Laurent Kassel
Moreshet, Israel

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Genealogical experiences in Hungary
From: Beth Long
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 23:36:46 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Michele,

Your analysis of Sip utca is (alas) quite correct. I dread having to go there. Fortunately, there is an alternative for Budapest records; the Budapest City Archives, which is quite modern and comfortable. They have both the civil records and the Jewish records (the latter only through 1895, when civil registration began).

As for the Budapest Jewish burial records, there is an online database:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Once you find someone here, you can find the grave, AND you can go back to the smoking lady at the Sip utca burial office and ask to see the card (which has usually lots of good information). Using this additional information, you can go to the city archive and pull the civil death record (and even make a digital photograph of it if you like, as long as it is at least 30 years old).

Same goes for civil birth and marriage records, except that birth records must be more than 90 years old, and marriage records, 75 (used to be 60, but recently changed).

Beth Long
Budapest


Re: Nyiregyhaza Jewish Census #hungary

Bill and Erika Schwartz <schwartzassociates@...>
 

There is a book that was obtained for me containing this same information
and everything published regarding the Holocaust in Nyiregyhaza. It was
obtained for me by Sandor Backsai, a member of this SIG. I did note,
however, that the census was not entirely accurate. It lists my Aunt Olga as
the wife of my father. Not accurate.
Erika Schwartz
Santa Clarita, CA

Also, there's a book put out by

----- Original Message -----
From: "Vivian Kahn" <viviankahn@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2008 10:53 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Nyiregyhaza Jewish Census

While researching my newly found Moskovits relatives >from Nyiregyhaza,

I came across a census of close to 5,000 names of Jewish residents
from 1944 or earlier (can't find a date) that may be of interest to
others with family >from this city. The list includes mother's maiden

name, home address, and the fate of those who perished including date.

The file is called A nyiregyhazi zsidok nevsora and the URL is
http://www.szabarchiv.hu/kepek/kialitas/zsidonevsor_2_v.htm#_ftnref1

<snip>


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Nyiregyhaza Jewish Census #hungary

Bill and Erika Schwartz <schwartzassociates@...>
 

There is a book that was obtained for me containing this same information
and everything published regarding the Holocaust in Nyiregyhaza. It was
obtained for me by Sandor Backsai, a member of this SIG. I did note,
however, that the census was not entirely accurate. It lists my Aunt Olga as
the wife of my father. Not accurate.
Erika Schwartz
Santa Clarita, CA

Also, there's a book put out by

----- Original Message -----
From: "Vivian Kahn" <viviankahn@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2008 10:53 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Nyiregyhaza Jewish Census

While researching my newly found Moskovits relatives >from Nyiregyhaza,

I came across a census of close to 5,000 names of Jewish residents
from 1944 or earlier (can't find a date) that may be of interest to
others with family >from this city. The list includes mother's maiden

name, home address, and the fate of those who perished including date.

The file is called A nyiregyhazi zsidok nevsora and the URL is
http://www.szabarchiv.hu/kepek/kialitas/zsidonevsor_2_v.htm#_ftnref1

<snip>