Date   

WOLF from Gailingen or Immendingen (Germany) #france

Ruth und Thomas Bloch <ruthomas.bloch@...>
 

I am looking for descendants of Baruch Moses WOLF and - of the same family
- Martin WOLF. They are told to have had a business called Gebruder WOLF,
Immendingen, some time during 20th century.

Thomas Bloch,
Zurich, Switzerland
Thomas.Bloch@...

MODERATOR NOTE: You should also post this note to the GerSIG
if you have not already done so.


French SIG #France WOLF from Gailingen or Immendingen (Germany) #france

Ruth und Thomas Bloch <ruthomas.bloch@...>
 

I am looking for descendants of Baruch Moses WOLF and - of the same family
- Martin WOLF. They are told to have had a business called Gebruder WOLF,
Immendingen, some time during 20th century.

Thomas Bloch,
Zurich, Switzerland
Thomas.Bloch@...

MODERATOR NOTE: You should also post this note to the GerSIG
if you have not already done so.


Help reading Familienten record - Viewmate # 10549 #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

I have posted to Viewmate a scan of the "Anmerkung" field of a
Familienten record. The paragraph at the top probably describes the
passing of the license >from a line that died out to another line.

I would appreciate help in transcribing and/or translating it

The URL is

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10549

Thanks,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, US


General info on Nazi identification #austria-czech

Marc Piel <marcpiel@...>
 

In several of the many cases (more than 70) where
I have helped people find relatives in the Shoah
memorial archives here in Paris, I have been asked
how to further search the name of the Nazi
personnel that had signed the papers. It would
seem that a further search is possible with the
following information:

The US National Archives has the complete set of
captured Nazi German government records, including
resettlement and naturalization records.
The latter type of records are >from the Nazi EWZ
office.

The US National Archives has all SS and some
Waffen-SS personnel records.

The LDS FHL only has a small subset of the EWZ
records at:

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

Regular military pesonnel records are in German
archives.


Marc Piel,
Paris, France.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Help reading Familienten record - Viewmate # 10549 #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

I have posted to Viewmate a scan of the "Anmerkung" field of a
Familienten record. The paragraph at the top probably describes the
passing of the license >from a line that died out to another line.

I would appreciate help in transcribing and/or translating it

The URL is

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10549

Thanks,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, US


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech General info on Nazi identification #austria-czech

Marc Piel <marcpiel@...>
 

In several of the many cases (more than 70) where
I have helped people find relatives in the Shoah
memorial archives here in Paris, I have been asked
how to further search the name of the Nazi
personnel that had signed the papers. It would
seem that a further search is possible with the
following information:

The US National Archives has the complete set of
captured Nazi German government records, including
resettlement and naturalization records.
The latter type of records are >from the Nazi EWZ
office.

The US National Archives has all SS and some
Waffen-SS personnel records.

The LDS FHL only has a small subset of the EWZ
records at:

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

Regular military pesonnel records are in German
archives.


Marc Piel,
Paris, France.


David Lewin is searching for "BREDA and KONSTANDT" #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Our long-time member, David Lewin >from London, is having trouble getting a
posting to us using plain text and has asked me to post this message re
families >from Olmutz/Olomouc and Opava {and then Chile and Tel Aviv} on his
behalf while he sorts out his computer problems. This is David's message:

I seek: 1. Ilona BREDOVA [BREDA] born on 24 September 1908 in Olmutz/Olomouc,
Moravia - daughter of Hugo and Irena KONSTANDT.

2. Irena KONSTANDTOVA [Irena KONSTANDT] nee BERTHOLD born on 31 January
1882

The BREDA family, was a co-owner of the BREDA & WEINSTEIN department
store in Opava, Czechoslovakia in the 1930s

Ilona BREDOVA was born on 24 September 1908 in Olomouc, daughter of
Hugo and Irena KONSTANDT. She married Pavel BREDA, born on 19 August 1902 in
Opava, the son of Max and Olga BREDA, founder of the BREDA & WEINSTEIN company.
Pavel BREDA was employed in the company, even after his father had
sold his share in the company to the other co-owner David WEINSTEIN.

Pavel BREDA and his wife Ilona had a son Pavel, born on 12 March
1934 in Opava, with whom they fled to Chile in 1939, most probably
via Great Britain and Uruguay.

A possible address in Chile for the BREDA family at one time was
Santiago de Chile, Coreo 19, Cas 19030.

Pavel BREDA had a brother Leo BREDA living in Tel Aviv, Israel. We do
not know which generation of *Pavel* this is, ie father or son.

We also seek Irena KONSTANDTOVA

All we know about Irena KONSTANDTOVA is that she was a widow, born on
31 January 1882 in Zabovresky with the maiden name BERTHOLD.

David Lewin {London]
email: <davidlewin@...>


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech David Lewin is searching for "BREDA and KONSTANDT" #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Our long-time member, David Lewin >from London, is having trouble getting a
posting to us using plain text and has asked me to post this message re
families >from Olmutz/Olomouc and Opava {and then Chile and Tel Aviv} on his
behalf while he sorts out his computer problems. This is David's message:

I seek: 1. Ilona BREDOVA [BREDA] born on 24 September 1908 in Olmutz/Olomouc,
Moravia - daughter of Hugo and Irena KONSTANDT.

2. Irena KONSTANDTOVA [Irena KONSTANDT] nee BERTHOLD born on 31 January
1882

The BREDA family, was a co-owner of the BREDA & WEINSTEIN department
store in Opava, Czechoslovakia in the 1930s

Ilona BREDOVA was born on 24 September 1908 in Olomouc, daughter of
Hugo and Irena KONSTANDT. She married Pavel BREDA, born on 19 August 1902 in
Opava, the son of Max and Olga BREDA, founder of the BREDA & WEINSTEIN company.
Pavel BREDA was employed in the company, even after his father had
sold his share in the company to the other co-owner David WEINSTEIN.

Pavel BREDA and his wife Ilona had a son Pavel, born on 12 March
1934 in Opava, with whom they fled to Chile in 1939, most probably
via Great Britain and Uruguay.

A possible address in Chile for the BREDA family at one time was
Santiago de Chile, Coreo 19, Cas 19030.

Pavel BREDA had a brother Leo BREDA living in Tel Aviv, Israel. We do
not know which generation of *Pavel* this is, ie father or son.

We also seek Irena KONSTANDTOVA

All we know about Irena KONSTANDTOVA is that she was a widow, born on
31 January 1882 in Zabovresky with the maiden name BERTHOLD.

David Lewin {London]
email: <davidlewin@...>


Searching for Kujawski descendants #unitedkingdom

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

My paternal grandfather, Szija Wolf KUJAWSKI, emigrated >from Poland to
England circa 1895. Originally >from Lodz, Poland, he left behind his
parents, a brother Pinkus Mayer, and two sisters - Kaza Jenta and Trajda
Ryfka (the latter his twin). Pinkus's two sons, Jakob Ber (Benjamin) and
Wolf, emigrated to the United States (in 1920 and 1940, respectively).
(Once there they adopted the surname of WINTER.) Grandfather's older sister
Kaza married a Michail ZONENBERG and was interned in the Lodz ghetto during
the Holocaust (and presumably perished there or later in a concentration
camp).

The National Archives Aliens Department and successors: Aliens Personal
Files, Applications for Naturalisation, and Aliens Department: Internees
Index (et al) show five entries for the name KUJAWSKI.

I am particularly interested in the "Internees at Liberty in UK" entry for a
Ruth Sara KUJAWSKI, born 25/11/14 in Hanheim, Germany, who in October 1939,
was working as a children's nurse in Liverpool. (Note: she was not interned
despite being classified as a "female enemy alien").

Other KUJAWSKIS were as follows:

HV KUHN (aka KUJAWSKI), DOB 22/4/22
MS KUJAWSKI, DOB 19/8/21
JZ KUJAWSKI, DOB 19/12/21
B KAY (aka KUJAWSKI), DOB 5/1/20

all of whom applied for naturalisation.

My special interest in Ruth Sara KUJAWSKI is because she was the only one
of the five who (presumably) sought refuge in England before the 2nd world
war. Entries for the other four show that they arrived in the UK - or at
least applied for naturalisation - after the war: between 1949 and 1970.

That said, I am interested in locating descendants of these individuals, if
alive today and living in the UK or elsewhere.

Please contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, California USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

KUJAWSKI/WINTER, Kalisz, Lodz, Poland/New Jersey & California, USA


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Searching for Kujawski descendants #unitedkingdom

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

My paternal grandfather, Szija Wolf KUJAWSKI, emigrated >from Poland to
England circa 1895. Originally >from Lodz, Poland, he left behind his
parents, a brother Pinkus Mayer, and two sisters - Kaza Jenta and Trajda
Ryfka (the latter his twin). Pinkus's two sons, Jakob Ber (Benjamin) and
Wolf, emigrated to the United States (in 1920 and 1940, respectively).
(Once there they adopted the surname of WINTER.) Grandfather's older sister
Kaza married a Michail ZONENBERG and was interned in the Lodz ghetto during
the Holocaust (and presumably perished there or later in a concentration
camp).

The National Archives Aliens Department and successors: Aliens Personal
Files, Applications for Naturalisation, and Aliens Department: Internees
Index (et al) show five entries for the name KUJAWSKI.

I am particularly interested in the "Internees at Liberty in UK" entry for a
Ruth Sara KUJAWSKI, born 25/11/14 in Hanheim, Germany, who in October 1939,
was working as a children's nurse in Liverpool. (Note: she was not interned
despite being classified as a "female enemy alien").

Other KUJAWSKIS were as follows:

HV KUHN (aka KUJAWSKI), DOB 22/4/22
MS KUJAWSKI, DOB 19/8/21
JZ KUJAWSKI, DOB 19/12/21
B KAY (aka KUJAWSKI), DOB 5/1/20

all of whom applied for naturalisation.

My special interest in Ruth Sara KUJAWSKI is because she was the only one
of the five who (presumably) sought refuge in England before the 2nd world
war. Entries for the other four show that they arrived in the UK - or at
least applied for naturalisation - after the war: between 1949 and 1970.

That said, I am interested in locating descendants of these individuals, if
alive today and living in the UK or elsewhere.

Please contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, California USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

KUJAWSKI/WINTER, Kalisz, Lodz, Poland/New Jersey & California, USA


Travel report #galicia

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friends,

I would like to share with you some notes >from my latest travel to
Galicia. It started on 30 Aug 2007 and ended on 9 Sep 2007.

It included the following places. (The full list includes more
places in Ukraine and Slovakia but not in Galicia - see my report
in H-SIG for extra details.)

* Ukraine: Drohobycz

* Poland: Dukla, Rymanow, Dubiecko, Bobowa, Rzepiennik Strzyzewski,
Bochnia, Krakow

Ukraine:

1) Drohobycz

This is the only cemetery outside the Carpathian area which I
visited. Surrounded by high fence and spans over a large area. Most
of the surviving tombstones (which are not many, I guess about 100)
date >from the 1920s and 1930s. Many of them are readable and some
have surnames. In another corner of the cemetery I found 2
tombstones >from 1830 and 1831!

Poland:

1) Dukla

My visit in Dukla was quite short, and it was raining, so I couldn't
find so many tombstones, but my general impression is that the
cemetery is in really bad condition! It's located in the woods
outside the town. many tombstones are broken, but still many are
readable, so there is more to discover...

2) Rymanow

Again, I had a really short visit there. The cemetery is large,
located on a hill. It is surrounded by fence and has 2 "Ohels."
Many visitors, I guess, come to pray there. It is in good condition
and has many interesting tombstones.

3) Dubiecko

This is where my grandfather and his family were living. The
cemetery has no tombstones, but is surrounded by fence.

Here I had a great success:
Since my first visit to that town, I had contacts with a local
family who is interested in the town's history, archeology etc...
Last year they had an exhibition of old photos, so I was able to
get a CD with many old photos >from the town. Most are of non Jewish
people, but a couple are! I know people who were born in the town
and will try to identify the photographed man.

Also, no Jewish birth, marriage or death record had survived. The
same family that gave me the CD also had a book with registers of
about 350 school children (Jewish and non Jewish) who went to school
in the 1930s. I was able to get this book overnight and took photos
of all the pages! I was able to find details about the 2 younger
brothers of my grandfather, who were killed during the war!
Information includes: Name, surname, parent's name, mother's maiden
name, exact date of birth, parents' occupation and years in which
the child attended school. Maybe this can be the basis of a new
Galicia-SIG project !

4) Bobowa

The cemetery is on a hillside, but easy to access. Vegetation was
not a major problem while I was there. There are, I guess, more than
200 tombstones and one Ohel. Many interesting tombstones. Only a few
have surnames. I was able to find tombstones of 2 distant relatives,
based on first name of the buried person and his father's.

5) Rzepiennik Strzyzewski

The cemetery in located in the woods, on a hill not far >from the
town. About 150 tombstones, mostly very large ones (width of 20 - 25
cm !). Many are readable but many are facing down or half buried.
I'm not sure if I found relatives' tombstones but I was able to
document the ones of the Rabbi and his wife (1880s), like I do in
any cemetery I visit.

6) Bochnia

This is where my grandmother and her family lived. This time I didn't
visit the cemetery and not even the monument that was erected last
year by the Organization of Former residents of Bochnia in Israel.
During the short time I had I managed to visit the local museum and
see some Judaica artefacts. One "Yad" (Silver stick to point on the
Torah scroll) had the donators' names: Mr Avigdor and Peril
BUCHHANDLER. (I'm not sure if I remember correctly... but it started
with "BUCH"....)

There is also 1896 book of marriage and an 1896 index of births >from
Bochnia. Another book is the 1913 birth register >from Nowy Wisnicz.
I don't know, but guess that copies of these records can be found in
the town archives.

The most interesting item was a book, in which every person, who
wanted to get any kind of official records, had to be registered.
It includes name, surname, date and place of birth, names of parents,
address, physical characteristics, the person's signature and... a
photo! The book in the museum dates >from 1938 / 1939 and has details
and photos of many Jewish people, some were born as early as 1865!
I was able to find my grandmother and her father in that book!
There was also a small booklet with old business and stores ads,
with many Jewish names.

Later I visited the local branch of the Polish State Archive.
Besides the BMD records (which I didn't see this time) there are
also a few books like the one in the museum, but these are a few
years earlier. There is an index to those books.

I was able to find photos of many Jewish people, including one of
my grandmother's cousin, who was killed in the war!

There is much more to see and find in both the museum and the
archive!

In my search for old photos I went to a local photo store and talked
with the owner, whose mother was a photographer before WWII. He
showed me a few photos >from the ghetto and promised to search for
more photos with Jewish people.... I couldn't ask for more :-)

7) Krakow

In Krakow I was during Shabbat, so didn't do anything besides going
to the old "Remu" (R' Moshe Isserlis) synagogue. This was a nice end
to this very busy and successful travel.

Final notes:

*) There is much more to see and discover about about our ancestors
but time is against the cemeteries condition... The sooner you visit
is the better, but you should come prepared: take a Polish speaking
guide, buy good shoes, camera with tripod (to take photos without a
flash - that's good in dark (!) places and for shine stones... Most
important is not just to take photo of the tombstones, but first
thing is to copy the inscription. Take white chalk to apply on the
stone's surface, making the sunken letters seen better. Use cemetery
books if available.

*) Try to make local contacts and search for unusual sources of
info - Photos and records in private hands.... Just ask around the
village and hopefully something will show up...

I hope you find this report interesting and wish you all SHANA TOVA
U-METUKA!!! Have a happy, healthy and successful new year!

Best regards,
Tomer Brunner, Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Travel report #galicia

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friends,

I would like to share with you some notes >from my latest travel to
Galicia. It started on 30 Aug 2007 and ended on 9 Sep 2007.

It included the following places. (The full list includes more
places in Ukraine and Slovakia but not in Galicia - see my report
in H-SIG for extra details.)

* Ukraine: Drohobycz

* Poland: Dukla, Rymanow, Dubiecko, Bobowa, Rzepiennik Strzyzewski,
Bochnia, Krakow

Ukraine:

1) Drohobycz

This is the only cemetery outside the Carpathian area which I
visited. Surrounded by high fence and spans over a large area. Most
of the surviving tombstones (which are not many, I guess about 100)
date >from the 1920s and 1930s. Many of them are readable and some
have surnames. In another corner of the cemetery I found 2
tombstones >from 1830 and 1831!

Poland:

1) Dukla

My visit in Dukla was quite short, and it was raining, so I couldn't
find so many tombstones, but my general impression is that the
cemetery is in really bad condition! It's located in the woods
outside the town. many tombstones are broken, but still many are
readable, so there is more to discover...

2) Rymanow

Again, I had a really short visit there. The cemetery is large,
located on a hill. It is surrounded by fence and has 2 "Ohels."
Many visitors, I guess, come to pray there. It is in good condition
and has many interesting tombstones.

3) Dubiecko

This is where my grandfather and his family were living. The
cemetery has no tombstones, but is surrounded by fence.

Here I had a great success:
Since my first visit to that town, I had contacts with a local
family who is interested in the town's history, archeology etc...
Last year they had an exhibition of old photos, so I was able to
get a CD with many old photos >from the town. Most are of non Jewish
people, but a couple are! I know people who were born in the town
and will try to identify the photographed man.

Also, no Jewish birth, marriage or death record had survived. The
same family that gave me the CD also had a book with registers of
about 350 school children (Jewish and non Jewish) who went to school
in the 1930s. I was able to get this book overnight and took photos
of all the pages! I was able to find details about the 2 younger
brothers of my grandfather, who were killed during the war!
Information includes: Name, surname, parent's name, mother's maiden
name, exact date of birth, parents' occupation and years in which
the child attended school. Maybe this can be the basis of a new
Galicia-SIG project !

4) Bobowa

The cemetery is on a hillside, but easy to access. Vegetation was
not a major problem while I was there. There are, I guess, more than
200 tombstones and one Ohel. Many interesting tombstones. Only a few
have surnames. I was able to find tombstones of 2 distant relatives,
based on first name of the buried person and his father's.

5) Rzepiennik Strzyzewski

The cemetery in located in the woods, on a hill not far >from the
town. About 150 tombstones, mostly very large ones (width of 20 - 25
cm !). Many are readable but many are facing down or half buried.
I'm not sure if I found relatives' tombstones but I was able to
document the ones of the Rabbi and his wife (1880s), like I do in
any cemetery I visit.

6) Bochnia

This is where my grandmother and her family lived. This time I didn't
visit the cemetery and not even the monument that was erected last
year by the Organization of Former residents of Bochnia in Israel.
During the short time I had I managed to visit the local museum and
see some Judaica artefacts. One "Yad" (Silver stick to point on the
Torah scroll) had the donators' names: Mr Avigdor and Peril
BUCHHANDLER. (I'm not sure if I remember correctly... but it started
with "BUCH"....)

There is also 1896 book of marriage and an 1896 index of births >from
Bochnia. Another book is the 1913 birth register >from Nowy Wisnicz.
I don't know, but guess that copies of these records can be found in
the town archives.

The most interesting item was a book, in which every person, who
wanted to get any kind of official records, had to be registered.
It includes name, surname, date and place of birth, names of parents,
address, physical characteristics, the person's signature and... a
photo! The book in the museum dates >from 1938 / 1939 and has details
and photos of many Jewish people, some were born as early as 1865!
I was able to find my grandmother and her father in that book!
There was also a small booklet with old business and stores ads,
with many Jewish names.

Later I visited the local branch of the Polish State Archive.
Besides the BMD records (which I didn't see this time) there are
also a few books like the one in the museum, but these are a few
years earlier. There is an index to those books.

I was able to find photos of many Jewish people, including one of
my grandmother's cousin, who was killed in the war!

There is much more to see and find in both the museum and the
archive!

In my search for old photos I went to a local photo store and talked
with the owner, whose mother was a photographer before WWII. He
showed me a few photos >from the ghetto and promised to search for
more photos with Jewish people.... I couldn't ask for more :-)

7) Krakow

In Krakow I was during Shabbat, so didn't do anything besides going
to the old "Remu" (R' Moshe Isserlis) synagogue. This was a nice end
to this very busy and successful travel.

Final notes:

*) There is much more to see and discover about about our ancestors
but time is against the cemeteries condition... The sooner you visit
is the better, but you should come prepared: take a Polish speaking
guide, buy good shoes, camera with tripod (to take photos without a
flash - that's good in dark (!) places and for shine stones... Most
important is not just to take photo of the tombstones, but first
thing is to copy the inscription. Take white chalk to apply on the
stone's surface, making the sunken letters seen better. Use cemetery
books if available.

*) Try to make local contacts and search for unusual sources of
info - Photos and records in private hands.... Just ask around the
village and hopefully something will show up...

I hope you find this report interesting and wish you all SHANA TOVA
U-METUKA!!! Have a happy, healthy and successful new year!

Best regards,
Tomer Brunner, Israel


Re: Russian translation please (one word) #general

Alan <ahs613_at_gmail_dot_com@...>
 

Today as I was washing our kiddish cup, I happened to
turn it over and saw what looks like a single word
stamped into the silver. I know the cup was brought
over >from Russia by my g-GF.

The word has 3 letters, and looks like (to the English
speaker's eye), >from left to right, a backwards
capital N, a capital E and a number 3. Using an online
Cyrillic alphabet, I think I may have tranliterated it
to "Iyez" (although I may of course be incorrect).

Does anyone know what this means?

Dayna Chalif
CA USA
---
Sender: Dayna <zoeys_mom@...>
http://www.silvercollection.it/russiansilverhallmark.html has a list of
Russian markings on silver. It includes an alphabetical list of
silversmith marks. One of these is IEZ, the initials of an unidentified
silversmith >from Kiev (see # 197, 172). I have some kiddush cups with
the same marks.

--
Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
ahs613 at gmail dot com

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian translation please (one word) #general

Alan <ahs613_at_gmail_dot_com@...>
 

Today as I was washing our kiddish cup, I happened to
turn it over and saw what looks like a single word
stamped into the silver. I know the cup was brought
over >from Russia by my g-GF.

The word has 3 letters, and looks like (to the English
speaker's eye), >from left to right, a backwards
capital N, a capital E and a number 3. Using an online
Cyrillic alphabet, I think I may have tranliterated it
to "Iyez" (although I may of course be incorrect).

Does anyone know what this means?

Dayna Chalif
CA USA
---
Sender: Dayna <zoeys_mom@...>
http://www.silvercollection.it/russiansilverhallmark.html has a list of
Russian markings on silver. It includes an alphabetical list of
silversmith marks. One of these is IEZ, the initials of an unidentified
silversmith >from Kiev (see # 197, 172). I have some kiddush cups with
the same marks.

--
Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
ahs613 at gmail dot com

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


BRANDT or BRAND #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

I'm trying to find any kind of info on a Solomon BRANDT . At the time of his
marriage in 1894, he was 25 and lived at No 3 Norfolk St., NYC. He married a
Rachael PIKHOLTZ, age 22 who lived at 163 Allen St., NYC. Both were born in
Russia. The last name could have been Americanize later on to be BRAND. Do you
know these people. The above info was gotten >from their marriage certificate.

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings) and KLEIN/KLINE
(of the Phila. Jewish Community Center family).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BRANDT or BRAND #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

I'm trying to find any kind of info on a Solomon BRANDT . At the time of his
marriage in 1894, he was 25 and lived at No 3 Norfolk St., NYC. He married a
Rachael PIKHOLTZ, age 22 who lived at 163 Allen St., NYC. Both were born in
Russia. The last name could have been Americanize later on to be BRAND. Do you
know these people. The above info was gotten >from their marriage certificate.

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings) and KLEIN/KLINE
(of the Phila. Jewish Community Center family).


KASDAY Family #general

adkedk@...
 

Hello I am new to this group and new to Genealogy.

I am trying to find out about my husbands family. His Parents and grandparents
are buried in Mount Hebron in New York. I know his burial lots were bought as a
group by something called ( sp ) Ancha kasa burial group and these were elders
who had arrived with his Grandfather.

His parents were Jules and Evelyn KASDAY and they were >from New York.
His Paternal Grandfather was called Max Kasday and his Grandmother was Rachel
and they came >from Russia
His Mothers parents were Jack or Jacob and Rebecca ( Becky ) BELINKER and came
from Romania.
They settled first in Philadelphia. He was a movie theater manager there.

He believes the name Kasday was changed or Americanised. His Grandfather lived
in Corona and had a grocery store.
His father had brothers Phil and Mo Kasday.

His Grandma Becky had 4 sisters and he thinks one was called Fanny.Becky was a
seamstress and one of the sisters husbands owned dressmaking factory(ies) in
Walden New York.

I am afraid I am missing a lot of information, with no way to recover it. His
memory is sketchy and his sister knows as little as he does.

If anyone can help at least with suggestions or to get started I would
appreciate the assistance.

Thank You
Anne Kasday
Massachusetts

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so, please enter this name in the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/>. It will be
permanantly findable by others looking for the same name, even if they spell it
differently.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KASDAY Family #general

adkedk@...
 

Hello I am new to this group and new to Genealogy.

I am trying to find out about my husbands family. His Parents and grandparents
are buried in Mount Hebron in New York. I know his burial lots were bought as a
group by something called ( sp ) Ancha kasa burial group and these were elders
who had arrived with his Grandfather.

His parents were Jules and Evelyn KASDAY and they were >from New York.
His Paternal Grandfather was called Max Kasday and his Grandmother was Rachel
and they came >from Russia
His Mothers parents were Jack or Jacob and Rebecca ( Becky ) BELINKER and came
from Romania.
They settled first in Philadelphia. He was a movie theater manager there.

He believes the name Kasday was changed or Americanised. His Grandfather lived
in Corona and had a grocery store.
His father had brothers Phil and Mo Kasday.

His Grandma Becky had 4 sisters and he thinks one was called Fanny.Becky was a
seamstress and one of the sisters husbands owned dressmaking factory(ies) in
Walden New York.

I am afraid I am missing a lot of information, with no way to recover it. His
memory is sketchy and his sister knows as little as he does.

If anyone can help at least with suggestions or to get started I would
appreciate the assistance.

Thank You
Anne Kasday
Massachusetts

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so, please enter this name in the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/>. It will be
permanantly findable by others looking for the same name, even if they spell it
differently.


Monument - Panevezys Jewish Cemetery #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In 1945, the Jewish cemetery in Panevezys contained 17,000
graves. It was not long before the Soviets removed all of the
gravestones and used them for building materials. The Jewish
cemetery was then turned into a public park. All that remains
today is a small stone monument in remembrance that it was
formerly the Jewish cemetery.

Last year, Genadij Kofman, Chairman of the Panevezys Jewish
Community, came up with the idea of building a large monument
to replace the small stone monument. He came up with a set
of grandiose plans and a cost of $50,000.00 USD. Quite frankly, I
thought he was reaching for the moon. The City of Panevezys
turned down Ganadij's plan and came up with a larger monument
at a cost of $70,000.00 together with a promise to underwrite
part of the cost.

I have just received a message >from Genadij which contained the
following - On September 10, the session of the municipal government
passed, and accepted the decision on 2008 to allocate 100,000 Litas
on construction of a monument. This is equal to $40,109.41 USD.

It looks like Genadij's dream will be realized. I have known him for
a number of years and he is very capable of getting things done. If
anyone would like to contact Genadij for more information, his email
address is genavta@... His English is very limited.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Monument - Panevezys Jewish Cemetery #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In 1945, the Jewish cemetery in Panevezys contained 17,000
graves. It was not long before the Soviets removed all of the
gravestones and used them for building materials. The Jewish
cemetery was then turned into a public park. All that remains
today is a small stone monument in remembrance that it was
formerly the Jewish cemetery.

Last year, Genadij Kofman, Chairman of the Panevezys Jewish
Community, came up with the idea of building a large monument
to replace the small stone monument. He came up with a set
of grandiose plans and a cost of $50,000.00 USD. Quite frankly, I
thought he was reaching for the moon. The City of Panevezys
turned down Ganadij's plan and came up with a larger monument
at a cost of $70,000.00 together with a promise to underwrite
part of the cost.

I have just received a message >from Genadij which contained the
following - On September 10, the session of the municipal government
passed, and accepted the decision on 2008 to allocate 100,000 Litas
on construction of a monument. This is equal to $40,109.41 USD.

It looks like Genadij's dream will be realized. I have known him for
a number of years and he is very capable of getting things done. If
anyone would like to contact Genadij for more information, his email
address is genavta@... His English is very limited.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia