Date   

Re: Questioning the theory of surnames in the Pale #belarus

vcharny@...
 

Working with many thousands of Jewish names >from all shtetls of Minsk=20
Gubernia I came to well expected conclusion that there is no uniformity=20
in way of the names origin.

Some names are old and were in use before 1805-1811. Usually the same=20
names you can find in the records of that time in locations far apart=20
from each other.
Other names were certainly local and =E2=80=9Cnew=E2=80=9D. Many of them cou=
ld be found=20
only in one or few close to each other shtetls. Many of them have=20
Slavic roots, suffixes, and endings but commonly could be Yiddish or=20
even Hebrew.

Comparing Jewish records in Minsk Gubernia in 19th century for
different shtetls and uyezds (districts) I see that naming wasn't the
result of Russian Imperial policies but indeed way of how local
authorities proceed with the reform. There is entire spectrum of
situations one can find in Minsk Gubernia and possibly in other areas
of Russian Empire.

In some shtetls you can find in the census of 1811 two families with the
same surnames and in other shtetls 1-3 names cover most of Jewish
population.

Possibly it means that in some places local authorities decided that
each family suppose to have distinctive family name and in other places
they let people use their traditional names.

In the last scenario the records usually shows that small shtetls
comprised >from people belonged to a few extended families. The same is
true for my experience with non-Jewish people in Belarusian villages as
well.

In some place you can find that all names in local Jewish community
were of Russian types - and it was in line with standardization of the
name in Ruissian Empire, similar was done for Muslim population and
others. It was very different >from official 19 century policy that not
allowed Jews to have given name used by Russian Christians. But in many
communities Jewish people adapted mostly Yiddish last names - possibly
local authorities didn't care about.

Another general rule I found for names that are derived >from location:
as smaller was shtetl (Jewish community of the shtetl) as closer to it
could be found people with related surname and otherwise.

It means for example that VILENSKY lived usually farther >from Vilna
than KLETSKY >from Kletsk. It is natural: around Vilna there were many
people >from this big community and to call somebody VILENSKY wasn't
very personal; but - far >from Kletsk not many people knew about Kletsk
and the name KLETSKY wouldn't be descriptive enough. Then VILENSKY was
good name for people >from Vilna who during name assignment lived far
>from Vilna where not many vilners lived and KLETSKY was good name for
people >from Kletsk who lived that time not far >from Kletsk (where
people know about Kletsk).

Of course as any such rules this one will have exceptions as well.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL
________________________________________________________________________


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Questioning the theory of surnames in the Pale #belarus

vcharny@...
 

Working with many thousands of Jewish names >from all shtetls of Minsk=20
Gubernia I came to well expected conclusion that there is no uniformity=20
in way of the names origin.

Some names are old and were in use before 1805-1811. Usually the same=20
names you can find in the records of that time in locations far apart=20
from each other.
Other names were certainly local and =E2=80=9Cnew=E2=80=9D. Many of them cou=
ld be found=20
only in one or few close to each other shtetls. Many of them have=20
Slavic roots, suffixes, and endings but commonly could be Yiddish or=20
even Hebrew.

Comparing Jewish records in Minsk Gubernia in 19th century for
different shtetls and uyezds (districts) I see that naming wasn't the
result of Russian Imperial policies but indeed way of how local
authorities proceed with the reform. There is entire spectrum of
situations one can find in Minsk Gubernia and possibly in other areas
of Russian Empire.

In some shtetls you can find in the census of 1811 two families with the
same surnames and in other shtetls 1-3 names cover most of Jewish
population.

Possibly it means that in some places local authorities decided that
each family suppose to have distinctive family name and in other places
they let people use their traditional names.

In the last scenario the records usually shows that small shtetls
comprised >from people belonged to a few extended families. The same is
true for my experience with non-Jewish people in Belarusian villages as
well.

In some place you can find that all names in local Jewish community
were of Russian types - and it was in line with standardization of the
name in Ruissian Empire, similar was done for Muslim population and
others. It was very different >from official 19 century policy that not
allowed Jews to have given name used by Russian Christians. But in many
communities Jewish people adapted mostly Yiddish last names - possibly
local authorities didn't care about.

Another general rule I found for names that are derived >from location:
as smaller was shtetl (Jewish community of the shtetl) as closer to it
could be found people with related surname and otherwise.

It means for example that VILENSKY lived usually farther >from Vilna
than KLETSKY >from Kletsk. It is natural: around Vilna there were many
people >from this big community and to call somebody VILENSKY wasn't
very personal; but - far >from Kletsk not many people knew about Kletsk
and the name KLETSKY wouldn't be descriptive enough. Then VILENSKY was
good name for people >from Vilna who during name assignment lived far
>from Vilna where not many vilners lived and KLETSKY was good name for
people >from Kletsk who lived that time not far >from Kletsk (where
people know about Kletsk).

Of course as any such rules this one will have exceptions as well.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL
________________________________________________________________________


Re: (belarus)DNA testing #belarus

Aztec765@...
 

In a message dated 8/1/2007 10:16:28 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
zall@... writes:
NationalGeographic is doing a project called A Genographic Project
We are participating in this project. I sent my DNA so we could track the
female lineage through the mitochondrial DNA and my brother gave his DNA to
track the male lineage.

It is interesting but only >from the standpoint of your deep ancestry. Their
testing cannot show where our immediate ancestors were in the recent past,
i.e. 500 years ago.

I learned that on my mother's side, we are of the haplogroup K. It seems
many eastern european jews are in that haplogroup. It also indicates that my
ancestors were in that region 17,000 years ago....so they were definitely not
roaming around the Sinai desert 6,000 years ago. So one must ask the
question as to how these women became Jewish. Utzi, that mummy found in the alps is
one of my ancestors.

My father's DNA showed that he is of the Haplogroup J and has the kohain
markers. So that test proved that he is a kohain and his DNA was pure middle
eastern. It would be interesting to know though how they got to Romania and
why.

Ellen Fuchs
Connecticut




************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: (belarus)DNA testing #belarus

Aztec765@...
 

In a message dated 8/1/2007 10:16:28 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
zall@... writes:
NationalGeographic is doing a project called A Genographic Project
We are participating in this project. I sent my DNA so we could track the
female lineage through the mitochondrial DNA and my brother gave his DNA to
track the male lineage.

It is interesting but only >from the standpoint of your deep ancestry. Their
testing cannot show where our immediate ancestors were in the recent past,
i.e. 500 years ago.

I learned that on my mother's side, we are of the haplogroup K. It seems
many eastern european jews are in that haplogroup. It also indicates that my
ancestors were in that region 17,000 years ago....so they were definitely not
roaming around the Sinai desert 6,000 years ago. So one must ask the
question as to how these women became Jewish. Utzi, that mummy found in the alps is
one of my ancestors.

My father's DNA showed that he is of the Haplogroup J and has the kohain
markers. So that test proved that he is a kohain and his DNA was pure middle
eastern. It would be interesting to know though how they got to Romania and
why.

Ellen Fuchs
Connecticut




************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


Yankovitch #unitedkingdom

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my
father's birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Yankovitch #unitedkingdom

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my
father's birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland)


Sources for Research #unitedkingdom

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I happened upon an interesting subscription web site, The Origins Network,
for what are mostly are British, Irish and Scots origins. This is a one
time mention of this site.

While many of the sources may be found on other sites, also subscription,
and others may relate to non-Jewish records, there are several which can be
quite rich in data for Jewish researchers, particular those investigating
pre-19th Century Jewish origins.

Some of these resources are:

Boyd's Inhabitants of London which is a collection of 60,000 handwritten
sheets detailing London families mainly >from the 16-18 Centuries.

London Apprentice Records: Fishmongers and Vintner records containing
80,000 names covering the years 1609-1800. These are the records of the
Livery Companies of London.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Sources for Research #unitedkingdom

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I happened upon an interesting subscription web site, The Origins Network,
for what are mostly are British, Irish and Scots origins. This is a one
time mention of this site.

While many of the sources may be found on other sites, also subscription,
and others may relate to non-Jewish records, there are several which can be
quite rich in data for Jewish researchers, particular those investigating
pre-19th Century Jewish origins.

Some of these resources are:

Boyd's Inhabitants of London which is a collection of 60,000 handwritten
sheets detailing London families mainly >from the 16-18 Centuries.

London Apprentice Records: Fishmongers and Vintner records containing
80,000 names covering the years 1609-1800. These are the records of the
Livery Companies of London.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...


Returning From Galicia #galicia

Yaakov Weiss <Gmw112252@...>
 

Dear JG Galicianiers:

Well, we are (B"H) back and I am not sure where to begin... except
to say that the trip was nothing short of our expectations. Here
are some of the highlights of our 14 days in Galicia, quoted >from
an email to friends:

"...As planned, we visited both Rabbis Bald and Kolesnik for each
of the two Shabbosim when we were in their cities. Both were
incredibly warm and helpful and provided an excellent overview of
old Jewish Lvov and Stanislowow, respectively. We also had second
seuda with the Kahal in the Ivano-Frankivsk Shul and with Rabbi
Bald and his wonderful family in Lviv.

"We engaged a guide who had great familiarity with the mountains
and nature of Carpathia. This, after a meeting at our hotel in
Ivano-F. having previously been in Lviv 4 days and a day in
Truskovits at a great spa (which served several varieties of Naptha
mineral water). We went on to some small shtetlach and a hidden
waterfall en route to Yarampshe. I went there to see the rural area
(but not so rural anymore) that my family used to go to before the
war and to find their property. The latter was at first difficult
but we were very persistent and after meeting with the mayor of the
town, we were directed right to the spot. It had been under our
noses all along as it was a big stretch of land and several
structures on the main street (now a government sanitorium).

"We parted with our guide in Yarampshe after experiencing some
engine problems. All (except the car) went according to plan. But
because of the weather which was all over the board and completely
unpredictable, I missed a small window of opportunity to swim with
him in the area beneath the Pruit Falls by the bridge in Yarampshe.
The brighter side is that I am very motivated to return, if only
for that.

"In Yarampshe we stayed at a hotel with a great view of the
mountains for one night and a small lodge for two more days. The
owner claimed to have hidden some Jews there during the war and
showed us a trap door under his parlor. The lodge still served well
water bucket and all and of course much better than the bottled
stuff claiming to be direct >from the source.

"We also met with a Kabalist/Numberologist named Raphael who we
connected with very nicely since he, his wife, and my wife are all
Israeli. Interestingly, his apartment bordered on an abandoned
shvitz (steam bath) which was part of my Grandparents' pension and
speaking of numbers, his wife's birthday was exactly the same as my
mother who spent a lot of time there, right next door (about 75
years ago).

"We then took a day trip on the narrow gauge railroad to Verokta
and returned by 'marshrutka' to Yarampshe. The following day we left
by bus back to Lviv via Ivano. The bus was painfully slow but we
took in the view of kleinshtetel life along the roads and anyway it
was raining so it turned out not to be a wasted day.

"When we arrived the weather cleared up, and I made the second of
my late afternoon-evening trips to Janovska and the surrounding area.
There I did about 5 miles or more of exploratory hiking making 2
rounds through the cemetery, and up behind the tram station, taking
photos of anything that I felt was of any significance. (I found
old human bones, guard houses hidden by overgrowth, a period
washbasin, impacted make-shift shoe soles stitched with string,
piles of ashes unearthed in construction activity beyond the forest,
well-worn trails in the forest, original fences, odd-looking streams
emanating >from nowhere thick with a reddish tint and so forth....)

"I took some more pictures of Kleparov Station, the railroad tracks,
and spoke to a few people... a guard at the cemetery, a neighbor to
the jail (former DAW), a woman who maintained a garden alongside the
camp, and a few very old Ukrainian women who spoke Polish (the
litmus test) along the tram (#7) route. One mustered a broad smile
when answering me, what happened to the Jews?

">from Lviv we took a day trip to Zolochov. Although my wife was
unimpressed, I was able to use my imagination to replace the
starkness of current street life with Yiddishkeit and saw the
vibrant city it probably once was along with most likely, the charm
that was consistent with it being called the 'city of poets.' No
longer. Seeing the marketplace without a single Jew buying or
selling was odd, but I'm sure it was once a bustling Shuk now
inherited by the locals, and the merchandise reflected it. Some new,
some like baby ducks and chicks being sold alongside a box of
cucumbers were probably old school.

"The castle (Zomek) was of course the tourist highlight there and
the pilgrimage buses of Polish expatriates was of great interest as
well. I spoke to one or two. On the mounds of earth near the castle
were what appeared to be human bone and teeth lying on the ground
and more poking out of the damp mud. As you probably know, there and
around the castle grounds a good many of the 14,000 murdered Jews of
Zolochev were buried in those piles of earth." (Note, to a JGen
member who wrote me before we left: There was no curator or
administrator there so it was not possible to determine whether
there were any records of the names of the Jews murdered there. A
lone Ukrainian soldier and a woman selling postcards were the only
officials in charge and neither was even knowledgeable enough to
know there was a commemorative plaque for the murdered Jews on a
nearby wall.)

"Back to Lviv, of course my token effort at doing any research in
the archives was met by the resistance of red-tape as well as the
language barrier. I'm not certain that I really needed many or any
records >from there, so I easily gave up and moved on to trying
(unsuccessfully) to reach the archivist, who I missed but have
since established contact. BTW, the library was packed to the
rafters with researchers busy and hard at work. (I may quit my
day job ;-).

"We also visited the final Ghetto area and my father's street in the
larger Ghetto area. We passed on the (Wagner) opera but did lots of
walking in the downtown area, even at night sometimes returning as
late as 2 a.m. We also managed to take very few taxis and I tried to
use the trolleys ('trams') as much as possible but that was hard
under our time constraints, although you couldn't beat the price
and the fun ride.

"At any rate, our planned trip to Warsaw by rail dwindled down to
Krakow and even that trip ultimately proved to be too ambitious for
the amount of time we had left so... that will remain for another
visit."

Let me just say that the trip was great and I thank you once again
very much for the helpful information you provided to us.

Please feel free to write, questions/comments.

And p.s. for anyone interested I posted our annotated initial
itinerary on my blog site under "Galicia 0707."
_http://gmw112252.blogspot.com/_


Best wishes,

Yaakov Weiss

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To learn more about the Ukrainian towns on
Yaakov's itinerary, search the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker
(http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/LocTown.asp) for
Ivano-Frankivs'k (formerly Stanislawow), L'viv, Truskavets,
Vorokhta, Yaremcha, and Zolochiv. Janowska was a forced labor camp
in the suburbs of Lviv. Its factories were part of the Deutsche
Ausrüstungwerke (DAW – German Armament Works), a division of the SS.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Returning From Galicia #galicia

Yaakov Weiss <Gmw112252@...>
 

Dear JG Galicianiers:

Well, we are (B"H) back and I am not sure where to begin... except
to say that the trip was nothing short of our expectations. Here
are some of the highlights of our 14 days in Galicia, quoted >from
an email to friends:

"...As planned, we visited both Rabbis Bald and Kolesnik for each
of the two Shabbosim when we were in their cities. Both were
incredibly warm and helpful and provided an excellent overview of
old Jewish Lvov and Stanislowow, respectively. We also had second
seuda with the Kahal in the Ivano-Frankivsk Shul and with Rabbi
Bald and his wonderful family in Lviv.

"We engaged a guide who had great familiarity with the mountains
and nature of Carpathia. This, after a meeting at our hotel in
Ivano-F. having previously been in Lviv 4 days and a day in
Truskovits at a great spa (which served several varieties of Naptha
mineral water). We went on to some small shtetlach and a hidden
waterfall en route to Yarampshe. I went there to see the rural area
(but not so rural anymore) that my family used to go to before the
war and to find their property. The latter was at first difficult
but we were very persistent and after meeting with the mayor of the
town, we were directed right to the spot. It had been under our
noses all along as it was a big stretch of land and several
structures on the main street (now a government sanitorium).

"We parted with our guide in Yarampshe after experiencing some
engine problems. All (except the car) went according to plan. But
because of the weather which was all over the board and completely
unpredictable, I missed a small window of opportunity to swim with
him in the area beneath the Pruit Falls by the bridge in Yarampshe.
The brighter side is that I am very motivated to return, if only
for that.

"In Yarampshe we stayed at a hotel with a great view of the
mountains for one night and a small lodge for two more days. The
owner claimed to have hidden some Jews there during the war and
showed us a trap door under his parlor. The lodge still served well
water bucket and all and of course much better than the bottled
stuff claiming to be direct >from the source.

"We also met with a Kabalist/Numberologist named Raphael who we
connected with very nicely since he, his wife, and my wife are all
Israeli. Interestingly, his apartment bordered on an abandoned
shvitz (steam bath) which was part of my Grandparents' pension and
speaking of numbers, his wife's birthday was exactly the same as my
mother who spent a lot of time there, right next door (about 75
years ago).

"We then took a day trip on the narrow gauge railroad to Verokta
and returned by 'marshrutka' to Yarampshe. The following day we left
by bus back to Lviv via Ivano. The bus was painfully slow but we
took in the view of kleinshtetel life along the roads and anyway it
was raining so it turned out not to be a wasted day.

"When we arrived the weather cleared up, and I made the second of
my late afternoon-evening trips to Janovska and the surrounding area.
There I did about 5 miles or more of exploratory hiking making 2
rounds through the cemetery, and up behind the tram station, taking
photos of anything that I felt was of any significance. (I found
old human bones, guard houses hidden by overgrowth, a period
washbasin, impacted make-shift shoe soles stitched with string,
piles of ashes unearthed in construction activity beyond the forest,
well-worn trails in the forest, original fences, odd-looking streams
emanating >from nowhere thick with a reddish tint and so forth....)

"I took some more pictures of Kleparov Station, the railroad tracks,
and spoke to a few people... a guard at the cemetery, a neighbor to
the jail (former DAW), a woman who maintained a garden alongside the
camp, and a few very old Ukrainian women who spoke Polish (the
litmus test) along the tram (#7) route. One mustered a broad smile
when answering me, what happened to the Jews?

">from Lviv we took a day trip to Zolochov. Although my wife was
unimpressed, I was able to use my imagination to replace the
starkness of current street life with Yiddishkeit and saw the
vibrant city it probably once was along with most likely, the charm
that was consistent with it being called the 'city of poets.' No
longer. Seeing the marketplace without a single Jew buying or
selling was odd, but I'm sure it was once a bustling Shuk now
inherited by the locals, and the merchandise reflected it. Some new,
some like baby ducks and chicks being sold alongside a box of
cucumbers were probably old school.

"The castle (Zomek) was of course the tourist highlight there and
the pilgrimage buses of Polish expatriates was of great interest as
well. I spoke to one or two. On the mounds of earth near the castle
were what appeared to be human bone and teeth lying on the ground
and more poking out of the damp mud. As you probably know, there and
around the castle grounds a good many of the 14,000 murdered Jews of
Zolochev were buried in those piles of earth." (Note, to a JGen
member who wrote me before we left: There was no curator or
administrator there so it was not possible to determine whether
there were any records of the names of the Jews murdered there. A
lone Ukrainian soldier and a woman selling postcards were the only
officials in charge and neither was even knowledgeable enough to
know there was a commemorative plaque for the murdered Jews on a
nearby wall.)

"Back to Lviv, of course my token effort at doing any research in
the archives was met by the resistance of red-tape as well as the
language barrier. I'm not certain that I really needed many or any
records >from there, so I easily gave up and moved on to trying
(unsuccessfully) to reach the archivist, who I missed but have
since established contact. BTW, the library was packed to the
rafters with researchers busy and hard at work. (I may quit my
day job ;-).

"We also visited the final Ghetto area and my father's street in the
larger Ghetto area. We passed on the (Wagner) opera but did lots of
walking in the downtown area, even at night sometimes returning as
late as 2 a.m. We also managed to take very few taxis and I tried to
use the trolleys ('trams') as much as possible but that was hard
under our time constraints, although you couldn't beat the price
and the fun ride.

"At any rate, our planned trip to Warsaw by rail dwindled down to
Krakow and even that trip ultimately proved to be too ambitious for
the amount of time we had left so... that will remain for another
visit."

Let me just say that the trip was great and I thank you once again
very much for the helpful information you provided to us.

Please feel free to write, questions/comments.

And p.s. for anyone interested I posted our annotated initial
itinerary on my blog site under "Galicia 0707."
_http://gmw112252.blogspot.com/_


Best wishes,

Yaakov Weiss

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To learn more about the Ukrainian towns on
Yaakov's itinerary, search the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker
(http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/LocTown.asp) for
Ivano-Frankivs'k (formerly Stanislawow), L'viv, Truskavets,
Vorokhta, Yaremcha, and Zolochiv. Janowska was a forced labor camp
in the suburbs of Lviv. Its factories were part of the Deutsche
Ausrüstungwerke (DAW – German Armament Works), a division of the SS.


Re: 1907 Galician gazetteer now online #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Brian J. Lenius wrote

(...)

With regards to Zukowice Nowe, Billie you have retrieved the
information correctly and it is interesting to note that the "total"
population of the estate was 10 people - all Jews. So it begs the
question, was the landlord a Jew? >from another source based on the
1900 census, the name of the landlord (major land holder) is given
as "Eust. ks. Sanguszki." He was obviously (by use of the
abbreviation ks.) a priest. So it seems reasonable that he may have
been itinerent and had a Jewish family overseeing or maintaining his
estate. This gives rise to another question. Was the Jewish family
working and doing all the work on the estate? The size of the estate
was less than 2 hectares and so was very small. Therefore it is
possible. However, most landlords had "free" labor >from nearby
peasant villagers in the community who owed debts to the landlord
and had no other way of repaying. Unfortunately, we do not know if
this was the case here.

I can not offer any definite explanations of why the number of Jews
is low based on your personal knowledge of the Jews who lived in
this community and estate. However, as with all census even today,
it is possible that some of the residents were not enumerated. The
only other explanation that I can think of is that perhaps the
"other" Jewish family, other than your own, may have lived there
just before or after the census was taken and therefore do not
appear in the numbers.

Brian J. Lenius
Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada
Brian,

Just a few clarifications:

1.
Abbreviation "ks. Sanguszki" does not relate to a priest. Individual
priests could not be landowners. Abbeviation "ks" applies not only
to "ksiadz" (priest) but also to the Prince (Ksiaze). Sanguszko
family alongside Princes Lubomirski and Tarnowski (hence Tarnow's
name), and notable few others, were mighty Polish magnates.

2.
Abbreviation "Eust." identifies Prince Eustachy Stanislaw Sanguszko
(1842-1903). He was very well known Galician politician. >from 1873
until 1901 member and >from 1890 to 1895 Marshal of the National Sejm
in Galicia, member of the Herrenhaus (Austrian House of Lords), and
member of the Austrian Council of the State >from 1879. As a
culmination of his political life was his post as the Governor of
Galicia >from 1895 until 1898.

3.
Zukowice Nowe, Zukowice Stare and the nearby Lisia Gora and Zaczerne
were identified even in the interwar period as succession of Prince
Roman Sanguszko.

4.
Slownik Geogarficzny Krolewstwa Polskiego (The Geographical
Dictionary of Kingdom of Poland) quotes population of Zukowice Nowe,
including homesteads Laski and Mokre, as 831 Roman Catholics and 26
Israelites (the adjacent to Zukowice Nowe, village Zukowice Stare
had 1,375 RC and 24 Jews). Slownik was published between years
1880 - 1902, hence population figures are closely reflecting
Billie's sources.

5.
The last issue is the estates area. Slownik quotes Sanguszko
property in Zukowice Nowe as 539 morg; this is equal to 322 hectares
or nearly 800 acres. BTW, total possession of Sanguszko family in so
called "Tarnowski key" land was 3,868 morg (2,320 ha) = 5,730 acres
or 9 miles sq.

Best Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Re:1907 Galician gazetteer now online #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Brian J. Lenius wrote

(...)

With regards to Zukowice Nowe, Billie you have retrieved the
information correctly and it is interesting to note that the "total"
population of the estate was 10 people - all Jews. So it begs the
question, was the landlord a Jew? >from another source based on the
1900 census, the name of the landlord (major land holder) is given
as "Eust. ks. Sanguszki." He was obviously (by use of the
abbreviation ks.) a priest. So it seems reasonable that he may have
been itinerent and had a Jewish family overseeing or maintaining his
estate. This gives rise to another question. Was the Jewish family
working and doing all the work on the estate? The size of the estate
was less than 2 hectares and so was very small. Therefore it is
possible. However, most landlords had "free" labor >from nearby
peasant villagers in the community who owed debts to the landlord
and had no other way of repaying. Unfortunately, we do not know if
this was the case here.

I can not offer any definite explanations of why the number of Jews
is low based on your personal knowledge of the Jews who lived in
this community and estate. However, as with all census even today,
it is possible that some of the residents were not enumerated. The
only other explanation that I can think of is that perhaps the
"other" Jewish family, other than your own, may have lived there
just before or after the census was taken and therefore do not
appear in the numbers.

Brian J. Lenius
Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada
Brian,

Just a few clarifications:

1.
Abbreviation "ks. Sanguszki" does not relate to a priest. Individual
priests could not be landowners. Abbeviation "ks" applies not only
to "ksiadz" (priest) but also to the Prince (Ksiaze). Sanguszko
family alongside Princes Lubomirski and Tarnowski (hence Tarnow's
name), and notable few others, were mighty Polish magnates.

2.
Abbreviation "Eust." identifies Prince Eustachy Stanislaw Sanguszko
(1842-1903). He was very well known Galician politician. >from 1873
until 1901 member and >from 1890 to 1895 Marshal of the National Sejm
in Galicia, member of the Herrenhaus (Austrian House of Lords), and
member of the Austrian Council of the State >from 1879. As a
culmination of his political life was his post as the Governor of
Galicia >from 1895 until 1898.

3.
Zukowice Nowe, Zukowice Stare and the nearby Lisia Gora and Zaczerne
were identified even in the interwar period as succession of Prince
Roman Sanguszko.

4.
Slownik Geogarficzny Krolewstwa Polskiego (The Geographical
Dictionary of Kingdom of Poland) quotes population of Zukowice Nowe,
including homesteads Laski and Mokre, as 831 Roman Catholics and 26
Israelites (the adjacent to Zukowice Nowe, village Zukowice Stare
had 1,375 RC and 24 Jews). Slownik was published between years
1880 - 1902, hence population figures are closely reflecting
Billie's sources.

5.
The last issue is the estates area. Slownik quotes Sanguszko
property in Zukowice Nowe as 539 morg; this is equal to 322 hectares
or nearly 800 acres. BTW, total possession of Sanguszko family in so
called "Tarnowski key" land was 3,868 morg (2,320 ha) = 5,730 acres
or 9 miles sq.

Best Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Searching for FRANKEL #galicia

Les Beckler <lesbeckler@...>
 

I am trying to find information about Israel FRANKEL b.1889 and his
father Nathan FRANKEL, both >from Austria. They were both tailors
and I know that Israel was in England by 1913 when he married Annie
RABBINOWITZ. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

Les Beckler


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Searching for FRANKEL #galicia

Les Beckler <lesbeckler@...>
 

I am trying to find information about Israel FRANKEL b.1889 and his
father Nathan FRANKEL, both >from Austria. They were both tailors
and I know that Israel was in England by 1913 when he married Annie
RABBINOWITZ. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

Les Beckler


Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #galicia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
where the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the
Schindler Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie
(Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now
complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and
volunteers who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that
depend on donations of money for translation are listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition