Date   

viewmate file VM10359 Jessica MOSKOVITZ #general

mjessie371@...
 

I would greatly appreciate any help with the translation of this. it
was found on the bac of a photograph of my great great grandparents,
the parents of Ethel Berger born in Hungary . Ethel was born in 1886. I
don't know the names of the parents; I was hoping maybe something in
the translation. Ethel's husband Herman Moskovitz was >from Felsohalas,
now part of slovakia.A private response is requested please.
Jessica Maree Moskovitz

MODERATOR NOTE: You may wish to submit this message to H-SIG too.
The direct link to this photo is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10359


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen viewmate file VM10359 Jessica MOSKOVITZ #general

mjessie371@...
 

I would greatly appreciate any help with the translation of this. it
was found on the bac of a photograph of my great great grandparents,
the parents of Ethel Berger born in Hungary . Ethel was born in 1886. I
don't know the names of the parents; I was hoping maybe something in
the translation. Ethel's husband Herman Moskovitz was >from Felsohalas,
now part of slovakia.A private response is requested please.
Jessica Maree Moskovitz

MODERATOR NOTE: You may wish to submit this message to H-SIG too.
The direct link to this photo is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10359


Viewmate, yiddish translation of two postcards #general

eileen
 

Dear Genners,

I would appreciate help with the translation of these two postcards.

VM 10352 came >from a cousin in London, England.

VM 10360 was written about 1990 >from a cousin, Asher Chemetz in Tel Aviv.

Thanks for your help.

Please answer privately.

Eileen Price
Denver, CO USA
Eileen.price@...

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10352
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10360


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate, yiddish translation of two postcards #general

eileen
 

Dear Genners,

I would appreciate help with the translation of these two postcards.

VM 10352 came >from a cousin in London, England.

VM 10360 was written about 1990 >from a cousin, Asher Chemetz in Tel Aviv.

Thanks for your help.

Please answer privately.

Eileen Price
Denver, CO USA
Eileen.price@...

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10352
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10360


Viewmate 10327 - #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

I need a translation of this Yiddish text - unfortunately the scan was
posted upside down.
The picture is taken in 1911 of my great-grandmother holding my mother,
in Winnipeg

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10327

Paul Silverstone
New York
www.paulsilverstone.com

Please reply to: paulh@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate 10327 - #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

I need a translation of this Yiddish text - unfortunately the scan was
posted upside down.
The picture is taken in 1911 of my great-grandmother holding my mother,
in Winnipeg

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10327

Paul Silverstone
New York
www.paulsilverstone.com

Please reply to: paulh@...


Unification of South Africa 1910 #southafrica

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

Family ‘tradition’ has it that my great-grandfather,
Franz GINSBERG (1862-1936) signed an ‘Act of Union’ (I
am not sure whether this is the exact name of whatever
he signed) when the component states of South Africa
became a Union in 1910. I know that he represented
King Williams Town at a Delimitation Conference in
East London held sometime early in 1910.

Does anyone have access to any lists of those who
signed documents that ‘sealed’ the unification of
South Africa in 1910 (maybe, the SOUTH AFRICA ACT,
1909 but perhaps some other document)? If yes, I would
be grateful if you would kindly send me whatever
information you find that of Ginsberg’s involvement in
the creation of the Union.

Thanks,

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@...>


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Unification of South Africa 1910 #southafrica

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

Family ‘tradition’ has it that my great-grandfather,
Franz GINSBERG (1862-1936) signed an ‘Act of Union’ (I
am not sure whether this is the exact name of whatever
he signed) when the component states of South Africa
became a Union in 1910. I know that he represented
King Williams Town at a Delimitation Conference in
East London held sometime early in 1910.

Does anyone have access to any lists of those who
signed documents that ‘sealed’ the unification of
South Africa in 1910 (maybe, the SOUTH AFRICA ACT,
1909 but perhaps some other document)? If yes, I would
be grateful if you would kindly send me whatever
information you find that of Ginsberg’s involvement in
the creation of the Union.

Thanks,

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@...>


GANS Family Research #southafrica

Andrew R. Meyers
 

Hi,
I am looking for relatives of a Meyer GANS who was probably >from Russia.
He had one son, Max, born about 1853 who moved to the US.
He had a daughter, Sara, born about 1852 who also moved to the US.
I believe there were also 2 other sons. One went to South America and the
other to South Africa.
Any information on either?
Thanks
Andrew Meyers
New York, NY


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica GANS Family Research #southafrica

Andrew R. Meyers
 

Hi,
I am looking for relatives of a Meyer GANS who was probably >from Russia.
He had one son, Max, born about 1853 who moved to the US.
He had a daughter, Sara, born about 1852 who also moved to the US.
I believe there were also 2 other sons. One went to South America and the
other to South Africa.
Any information on either?
Thanks
Andrew Meyers
New York, NY


Re: Hiring photographers #belarus

Evelyne Haendel <haendelevelyne@...>
 

Re : Franklin James Swartz message re Hiring photographers.

Thank you Frank, but it would be so nice also to know what is EEJHP?

Evelyne Haendel
Belgium


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Hiring photographers #belarus

Evelyne Haendel <haendelevelyne@...>
 

Re : Franklin James Swartz message re Hiring photographers.

Thank you Frank, but it would be so nice also to know what is EEJHP?

Evelyne Haendel
Belgium


SZWARCBURG #lodz #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Business documents >from 1932 associated with Chaim SZWARCBURG of ul. Al. 1
Maja, including his signature, are being sold in an auction to which I have
no connection. Please contact me privately for details.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland SZWARCBURG #lodz #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Business documents >from 1932 associated with Chaim SZWARCBURG of ul. Al. 1
Maja, including his signature, are being sold in an auction to which I have
no connection. Please contact me privately for details.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


translation help VM 10359 #hungary

mjessie371@...
 

i would appreciate any help in the translation >from the back of a
photo; it is of my great grandmother's ethel berger's parents. i think
ethel ( born 1886) and her parents were >from a town called mezafaluas.
her husband herman moskovitz ( born may 1878) was >from an area i think
known as felso ribynicze, now in present day slovakia. I have no more
information about ethel's parents except for that they were in the
wheat business. i was hoping the text on the photo would give more
information. thank you in advance for any help. a private response is
requested please.
jessica maree moskovitz
memphis, TN USA
________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free

from AOL at AOL.com.


Re: Acronymic Names and Who's a Sephardic Jew #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/9/2007 9:27:35 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
malkajef@... writes:

<< Jews of the Christian world (who became known as Ashkenazim although
the term really refers to a region of southern Germany and northern France)
followed the Jerusalem Talmud to which they had access through Italy.
The Jews who lived under Islam followed the Babylonian Talmud and the
teachings of the Babylonian geonim who - until the 10th century - lived
near Baghdad, the very center of the Islamic world. The two groups,
though sharing the same Jewish beliefs and praying in the same Hebrew,
used different prayer books, developed different pronunciations,
different cursive scripts and different vernacular languages. >>

==Dr, Malka is unquestionably an expert of Sephardi genealogy and I am
reluctant to take issue with him, but I believe his comment on Ashkenasi Jews
and the Babylonian Talmud is incorrect. The Babylonian Talmud is the prime
source of rabbinical thought for Ashkenasim as for Sefardim, and familiarity
with Rashi's commentaries on the Torah and on Talmud Bavli (Babylonian Talmud)
should make this quite clear.

==Perhaps Dr. Malka is confusing the Yerushalmi heritage with custom and
Nussach. The Yerushalmi traditions in this area were introduced into the
Rhineland area by the Kalonymos family of rabbis who were established in Italy
and were invited by the Carolignian emperors in the 9th century to leave their
home in Lucca, Italy, to lead Ashkenasi Jews in Mayence (Magentsa/Mainz).

==They brought with them the Yerushalmi pronunciation of Hebrew, the order of
prayers, and certain customs and details that became part of Ashkenasi
practice. Spanish Jews invited teachers >from Bavel (Mesopotamia) who brought
their customs and pronunciations that were not necessarily like those of the
older communities of Jews in North Africa who formed the core of Spain's Jewry.

==Sefardi Halakha was formulated continuously over four centuries. Yosef Caro
and his Shulchan Arukh ("laid-out table" not "dressed") was by no means the
first. Certainly the Mishneh Torah of R' Moshe ben Maimon (RAMBAM or
Maimonides) was a deciding formulation that represented Sefardi rabbinic
thinking in the 12th century CE. The Mappah of R' Isserles did not dispute the
Shulchan Arukh of Caro but laid out various fine points of Halakha where
Ashkenasi and Sefardi practices differed. These are all, in effect, quite
minor.

==Finally, Ashkenas was always associated with Germany. The customs of the
Germanic areas of the Rhineland core of Judaism in the 10th and 11th centuries
and of the French speaking areas were similar and the two Jewish communities
were highly intermingled, but the French-speaking area was not considered to be
part of Ashkenas. The Encyclopedia Judaica has a very clear explanation of the
use of the name Ashkenas.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary translation help VM 10359 #hungary

mjessie371@...
 

i would appreciate any help in the translation >from the back of a
photo; it is of my great grandmother's ethel berger's parents. i think
ethel ( born 1886) and her parents were >from a town called mezafaluas.
her husband herman moskovitz ( born may 1878) was >from an area i think
known as felso ribynicze, now in present day slovakia. I have no more
information about ethel's parents except for that they were in the
wheat business. i was hoping the text on the photo would give more
information. thank you in advance for any help. a private response is
requested please.
jessica maree moskovitz
memphis, TN USA
________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free

from AOL at AOL.com.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Acronymic Names and Who's a Sephardic Jew #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/9/2007 9:27:35 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
malkajef@... writes:

<< Jews of the Christian world (who became known as Ashkenazim although
the term really refers to a region of southern Germany and northern France)
followed the Jerusalem Talmud to which they had access through Italy.
The Jews who lived under Islam followed the Babylonian Talmud and the
teachings of the Babylonian geonim who - until the 10th century - lived
near Baghdad, the very center of the Islamic world. The two groups,
though sharing the same Jewish beliefs and praying in the same Hebrew,
used different prayer books, developed different pronunciations,
different cursive scripts and different vernacular languages. >>

==Dr, Malka is unquestionably an expert of Sephardi genealogy and I am
reluctant to take issue with him, but I believe his comment on Ashkenasi Jews
and the Babylonian Talmud is incorrect. The Babylonian Talmud is the prime
source of rabbinical thought for Ashkenasim as for Sefardim, and familiarity
with Rashi's commentaries on the Torah and on Talmud Bavli (Babylonian Talmud)
should make this quite clear.

==Perhaps Dr. Malka is confusing the Yerushalmi heritage with custom and
Nussach. The Yerushalmi traditions in this area were introduced into the
Rhineland area by the Kalonymos family of rabbis who were established in Italy
and were invited by the Carolignian emperors in the 9th century to leave their
home in Lucca, Italy, to lead Ashkenasi Jews in Mayence (Magentsa/Mainz).

==They brought with them the Yerushalmi pronunciation of Hebrew, the order of
prayers, and certain customs and details that became part of Ashkenasi
practice. Spanish Jews invited teachers >from Bavel (Mesopotamia) who brought
their customs and pronunciations that were not necessarily like those of the
older communities of Jews in North Africa who formed the core of Spain's Jewry.

==Sefardi Halakha was formulated continuously over four centuries. Yosef Caro
and his Shulchan Arukh ("laid-out table" not "dressed") was by no means the
first. Certainly the Mishneh Torah of R' Moshe ben Maimon (RAMBAM or
Maimonides) was a deciding formulation that represented Sefardi rabbinic
thinking in the 12th century CE. The Mappah of R' Isserles did not dispute the
Shulchan Arukh of Caro but laid out various fine points of Halakha where
Ashkenasi and Sefardi practices differed. These are all, in effect, quite
minor.

==Finally, Ashkenas was always associated with Germany. The customs of the
Germanic areas of the Rhineland core of Judaism in the 10th and 11th centuries
and of the French speaking areas were similar and the two Jewish communities
were highly intermingled, but the French-speaking area was not considered to be
part of Ashkenas. The Encyclopedia Judaica has a very clear explanation of the
use of the name Ashkenas.

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@...


viewmate translation help VM 10359 #hungary

mjessie371@...
 

I would appreciate anyone who could possibly help me with a translation
on the back of a photo i have. my great grandfather herman moskovitz (
born may 1878) married ethel berger ( 1886) and the photo is a picture
of ethel's parents. we do not know their names; i believe ethel may be
>from mezafaluas , but i am not sure. herman was >from felso ribnyicze
now in slovzkia. i think ethel came to america around 1909, but i
haven't been able to locate a manifest. i was hoping maybe this text
could help identify her parents , i am pretty sure it is in
hungarian.thank you to anyone who could help with this. it is file
10359 in viewmate. a private response i requested please.
jessica maree moskovitz
________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free
from AOL at AOL.com.


Hungary SIG #Hungary viewmate translation help VM 10359 #hungary

mjessie371@...
 

I would appreciate anyone who could possibly help me with a translation
on the back of a photo i have. my great grandfather herman moskovitz (
born may 1878) married ethel berger ( 1886) and the photo is a picture
of ethel's parents. we do not know their names; i believe ethel may be
>from mezafaluas , but i am not sure. herman was >from felso ribnyicze
now in slovzkia. i think ethel came to america around 1909, but i
haven't been able to locate a manifest. i was hoping maybe this text
could help identify her parents , i am pretty sure it is in
hungarian.thank you to anyone who could help with this. it is file
10359 in viewmate. a private response i requested please.
jessica maree moskovitz
________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free
from AOL at AOL.com.